~ July 9, 2020  ~
TEACHING INNOVATIONS
The Aspen Institute Business & Society Program: Barbara Dyer, Leigh Hafrey, C. Christine Kelly, Thomas Kochan

How can business students help establish balance between communities, individuals and the common good, while building resilience and bridging divides? These professors discuss this, teaching a fieldwork-oriented course during a pandemic, and more in our interview about their award-winning course, Bridging the American Divides (USA Lab).
1
FUTURE OF WORK
Project Syndicate: Daron Acemoglu

Can America "use this moment to turn things around for the bottom 50%"? (also see Gig Workers Are Here to Stay. It's Time to Give Them Benefits. and Who Died for Your Dinner?)
2
What is the "root problem" of innovations like AI, and where do we start fixing it?
3
FINANCE
The Indicator from Planet Money: Stacey Vanek Smith, Darius Rafieyan

How are race and finance intertwined, and why does it matter who owns a bank? (also see 'Banking while Black'...)
4
INNOVATION
Democracy Journal: Sophia Crabbe-Field

What is the right balance between "the incentivizing power of patents for innovation" and monopolies that limit access to medications like vaccines? Does a pandemic change the answer?
5
TEACHING INNOVATIONS
Marketplace: Kai Ryssdal, Gary Hoover

Are you an educator wondering how to do justice to this moment in history? You're not alone. (For more examples of innovation in teaching, check out these award-winning courses!)
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