Editor's Note
The New York Times reports on the growing need for research on CBD as more of these products are marketed to provide a increasing number of health benefits. The article reports that scientists have long known CBD has anticonvulsant and anti-inflammatory effects, but it was not until recent years that CBD got more serious attention from researchers, who initially were more interested in studying cannabis’s psychogenic components, like THC. Studies are now getting underway to evaluate whether CBD can alleviate anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder, or help with substance abuse and tobacco cessation. Scientists are also anticipating easier access to CBD for research since the Farm Bill signed late last year removed hemp-derived products like CBD from the list of Schedule 1 controlled substances, and allowed for the cultivation of hemp.
Cannabidiol, or CBD, a nonintoxicating component of the marijuana plant, is touted as a magic bullet that eases pain, anxiety, insomnia and depression. Salves, sprays, tinctures and oils containing CBD are marketed as aphrodisiacs that boost desire; as balms for eczema, pimples and hot flashes; and even as treatments for serious diseases like diabetes and multiple sclerosis. ...

Scientists have long known CBD has anticonvulsant and anti-inflammatory effects, but it was not until recent years that CBD got more serious attention from researchers, who initially were more interested in studying cannabis’s psychogenic components, like THC. ...

Studies are now getting underway to evaluate whether CBD can alleviate anxiety or post-traumatic stress disorder, or help with substance abuse and tobacco cessation.