CEAS WEEKLY eBULLETIN
November 6 | Issue 1
FEATURED EVENTS
Rea Tajiri: History and Memory
Film Screening & Discussion
November 7, 2020 | 7:00 p.m. CST

Q&A Session: Director Rea Tajiri (Temple University) and Professor Vincent Schleitwiler (University of Washington)

Moderator: Professor Chelsea Foxwell (University of Chicago)

You will not need a Twitch account to watch the film or the discussion. If you would like to ask questions to the speakers, you'll need to sign up for a free Twitch account.

Groundbreaking and haunting, this film is a poetic composition of recorded history and nonrecorded memory. Director Rea Tajiri's family was among the 120,000 Japanese and Japanese Americans who were imprisoned in internment camps after the attack on Pearl Harbor. And like so many who were in the camps, their memories of that experience was wrapped in a shroud of silence and forgetting.

This event is co-sponsored by South Side Projections, the Logan Center for the Arts, and the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with generous support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.
East Asia by the Book!
CEAS Author Talks
Prof. Judith Farquhar
(University of Chicago)

November 10, 2020 | 5:00 p.m. CST

Discussant: Professor P. Sean Brotherton (University of Chicago)

A Way of Life: Things, Thought, and Action in Chinese Medicine developed from a series of lectures at Yale in 2017. The book offers a philosophical introduction to Chinese traditional medicine. Reflection on the things recognized by Chinese medicine presents fresh problems in ontology. A reading of scholarly writing and thought in the field proposes a challenging epistemology. And a view of Chinese medical action through a pragmatic lens suggests that there is no thing or thought outside of practical imperatives.

This event is sponsored by The University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies and the Seminary Co-op Bookstores.
Remembering the Unremembered:
Kim- Gun Film Screening and Discussion

November 12, 2020 | 6:30 p.m. CST

Q&A Session: Director Sangwoo Kang

KIM-GUN searches for the whereabouts of a young man whose identity has sparked a national controversy over the May 18, 1980 Gwangju Uprising. Starting with the vague memories of those who had crossed paths with him during that time, the film tracks down those who participated in the Uprising as "Citizen Soldiers."

This event is sponsored by Northwestern University Asian Languages and Cultures Department and the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with generous support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the U.S. Department of Education.
East Asia by the Book!
CEAS Author Talks
Prof. Mia Yinxing Liu
(California College of the Arts)
November 16, 2020 | 5:00 p.m. CST

Discussant: Professor Paola Iovene (University of Chicago)

Literati Lenses: Wenren Landscape in Chinese Cinema of the Mao Era shows there were attempts to re-invest the cinematic representations of literati icons and sites with the new political and ideological imperatives during the lax periods between the political campaigns and crackdowns under Mao. The book focuses on these “problematic” or even “poisonous” films, words used in official criticism from the Party’s media, and demonstrates that in these films lies the lineage between cinema and the aesthetics of traditional landscape art.

This event is sponsored by The University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies and the Seminary Co-op Bookstores.
East Asia by the Book!
CEAS Author Talks
Prof. Martin Powers
(University of Michigan)

November 17, 2020 | 5:00 p.m. CST

China and England The Preindustrial Struggle for Justice in Word and Image examines egalitarian social ideals and institutions that arose in preindustrial China and England. In the process, it uncovers China’s forgotten role in the history of social justice debate and legislation during the eighteenth century.

This event is sponsored by The University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies and the Seminary Co-op Bookstores.
CEAS Lecture Series
Prof. Ian Miller
(Harvard University)
November 19, 2020 | 5:00 p.m. CST

Using Japan’s peculiar case—an immense archipelagic economy utterly dependent on overseas sources of energy — an argument will be made against the dominant nomenclature in the social sciences and policy circles, against the suitability of “energy transition,” in favor of the common Japanese term, enerugii kakumei, or “energy revolution.” The political, economic, technical, and cultural dynamics that fueled the creation of the nation’s modern political-economy were called “miraculous” by Cold War modernization theorists; seen through the haze of emissions, they look more like a eco-technical revolution whose undoing demands a commensurate response..

This event is sponsored by The University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies and the University of Chicago Library.