CEAS WEEKLY eBULLETIN
February 12 | Issue 12
HAPPY LUNAR NEW YEAR!
2021 YEAR OF THE OX!

FEATURED EVENTS
February 16, 2021 | 5:00 p.m. CST

This lecture takes a closer look at the mechanisms employed to regulate literary production in Xi Jinping’s China, by looking at official documents outlining the perceived role and responsibilities of both printed and online literature and its publishers. The paper also addresses the ambiguous manner in which the Chinese Writers Association promotes these policies while maintaining independent aesthetic principles. Professor Michel Hockx, Professor of Chinese Literature in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Director of the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies at the University of Notre Dame, concludes with a brief case study of the genre of “pandemic poetry” as an example of the kind of writing that the state promotes.
Translation and Language Justice in Border Zones
February 16, 2021 | 6:00 p.m. CST

JD Pleucker & Jen Hofer (Antena Aire Collective) & Don Mee Choi

Moderator: Professor Rachel Galvin (Associate Professor of English Language & Literature at the University of Chicago)

Translation is one of the central mechanisms of literary creativity across the world, yet the labor of translation, and its generativity, has traditionally been elided or even undermined in academic discourse. This biweekly colloquia curated by Professor Jennifer Scappettone and Professor Haun Saussy, is meant to jumpstart the new cross-departmental initiative in Translation Studies at the University.

The colloquium offer opportunities to think through both the theory and practice of this art form and means of cultural transmission, focusing on the problems of translation of and by poets in a variety of languages: it emphasizes precisely the genre most easily “lost in translation,” as the truism goes.

This event is co-sponsored by Division of the Humanities (Departments of Creative Writing, Translation Studies, Comparative Literature, and English), The Franke Institute for the Humanities, the University of Chicago Master of Arts in the Humanities, and the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with generous support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.
February 23, 2021 | 5:00 p.m. CST

The Tetsuo Najita Distinguished Lecture series was launched in 2007 by the CEAS Committee on Japanese Studies to honor the legacy of Tetsuo Najita (1936-2021), Robert S. Ingersoll Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of History and of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, and his contribution to the university during his long career. Harvard University’s Professor Mary Brinton, Reischauer Institute Professor of Sociology and Director, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, will deliver the 14th Annual Tetsuo Najita Distinguished Lecture entitled, “How Japan Got It Wrong: Government Policy, Gender, and the Birth Rate.”

Over the past three decades, the Japanese government has enacted a series of measures to boost the country’s anemic birth rate. Nevertheless, the birth rate has hovered around 1.4 children per woman, far below what is required for the population to reproduce itself. Why haven’t the policies worked? Hear Professor Brinton argue that policies focused on trying to make women’s work lives more like men’s have fundamentally missed the mark. Not only have such policies failed to raise the birth rate, they have also arguably exacerbated gender inequality. Professor Brinton suggests that future government and workplace policies move in a different direction.

Join us this evening as we welcome Processor Mary Brinton, and remember the scholarship, teaching, mentoring, and service in the field of Japanese studies by renowned scholar, Professor Tetsuo Najita.

This event is sponsored by the Center for East Asian Studies and the International House at the University of Chicago.
 East-West, On-Off Transit
February 23, 2021 | 6:00 p.m. CST

Jonathan Stalling & Sawako Nakayasu

Moderator: Professor Haun Saussy (Professor of Comparative Literature Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago)

Translation is one of the central mechanisms of literary creativity across the world, yet the labor of translation, and its generativity, has traditionally been elided or even undermined in academic discourse. This biweekly colloquia curated by Professor Jennifer Scappettone and Professor Haun Saussy, is meant to jumpstart the new cross-departmental initiative in Translation Studies at the University.

The colloquium offer opportunities to think through both the theory and practice of this art form and means of cultural transmission, focusing on the problems of translation of and by poets in a variety of languages: it emphasizes precisely the genre most easily “lost in translation,” as the truism goes.

This event is co-sponsored by Division of the Humanities (Departments of Creative Writing, Translation Studies, Comparative Literature, and English), The Franke Institute for the Humanities, the University of Chicago Master of Arts in the Humanities, and the University of Chicago Center for East Asian Studies with generous support from a Title VI National Resource Center Grant from the United States Department of Education.
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Professor Prasenjit Duara
Duke University
The Varieties of Secularism: China, Japan and India
Professor Thomas Talhelm
University of Chicago
Moving Chairs in Starbucks: How Rice Farming Made Southern China More Interdependent Than the North
Professor Xuefei Ren
Michigan State University
Governing the Urban in China and India: Land Grabs, Slum Clearance, and the War on Air Pollution
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