"To say that we are living in extraordinary times would be quite the understatement. The current threat and the applied remedies have also been extraordinary. The question of how we responded to this current threat and the consequences of that response will occupy leaders for years to come. This daily update is intended to provide you with factual information in the form of current data relating to covid as well as relevant information regarding unemployment benefits which are crucial to our constituents in this forced unemployment.

Additionally, I have included links to articles regarding our current crisis. Inclusion of these links do not constitute an outright endorsement of all that is said within the article, rather a means of exposure to thoughts, ideas and observations on a subject that is as novel as the virus itself. As lawmakers we will be tasked, not only with reestablishing the financial order of the state but with preparing our great state for similar threats in the future. One of the multitude of important questions for us to ponder is, if this is the best and only reaction to such a threat can we afford to do it again in the fall, or next year?

As lawmakers we must question, deliberate and propose. It is not an easy job in good times, it is a far more politically perilous one in crisis, but that is the job. I hope you will find these updates helpful and informative as we help our residents navigate this unprecedented time."

- House Speaker Jose R. Oliva
Current as of May 19, 2020 at 8:00 a.m.
 Sources linked beneath data.

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COVID - 19 TESTING AND RE-OPENING FLORIDA
COVID-19 Testing Sites - Florida

Drive-Thru Testing sites available are listed by county.
Each walk up site can test up to 200 individuals per day.


Safe. Smart. Step-by-Step
Governor's Office Announces Recovery Plan


RE-EMPLOYMENT DASHBOARD
FLORIDA DEPT. OF ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY
The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity is now giving daily updates on Florida’s Reemployment Assistance program in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

FLORIDA CASE DATA
TOTAL CASES IN FLORIDA

46,422

TOTAL FLORIDA FATALITIES

1,997

TOTAL US POSITIVE TESTS

1,499,742

TOTAL US NEGATIVE TESTS

10,344,786

% OF AMERICANS TESTED THAT TEST POSITIVE

12.67%

% OF AMERICANS TESTED THAT TEST NEGATIVE

87.23%

AVAILABLE HOSPITAL CAPACITY IN FLORIDA

% OF HOSPITAL BEDS AVAILABLE IN FLORIDA

31.69%

% OF TOTAL HOSPITAL BEDS STILL AVAILABLE IN HARDEST HIT COUNTIES
BROWARD

32.69%

% OF TOTAL HOSPITAL BEDS STILL AVAILABLE IN HARDEST HIT COUNTIES
MIAMI DADE

32.42%

% OF TOTAL HOSPITAL BEDS STILL AVAILABLE IN HARDEST HIT COUNTIES
PALM BEACH
36.44%

% OF TOTAL HOSPITAL BEDS STILL AVAILABLE IN HARDEST HIT COUNTIES
ORANGE

19.47%

FLORIDA TESTING DATA

NUMBER OF FLORIDIANS TESTED FOR COVID-19

677,710
https://www.realclearpolitics.com/coronavirus/

% OF FLORIDA POPULATION TESTED

3.1%
https://www.realclearpolitics.com/coronavirus/

CONFIRMED POSITIVE AS A % OF POPULATION IN FLORIDA

0.2111%

FATALITIES AS A % OF POPULATION IN FLORIDA

0.0090%

PERCENTAGE OF FLORIDIANS TESTED W/ POSITIVE RESULTS

6.9%

PERCENTAGE OF FLORIDIANS TESTED W/ NEGATIVE RESULTS

93.1%

THE COVID TRACKING PROJECT
The data for this site comes from  COVIDTracking.com    rt.live  , the  CDC and   NYT  . The data powering the charts can be found in this  Google Spreadsheet

Comprehensive Data Table
FLORIDA'S CASE DAILY DATA AND TREND
Cases confirmed in Florida residents per day for the past 2 weeks
(More testing, more infections means many more people have or had Coronavirus. This fact, when properly counted and factored in, will yield much much lower mortality rate)

US AND WORLDWIDE STATISTICS AND TRENDLINES
COVID-19 Data Visualizations

(Source - https://ourworldindata.org/ Our World in Data and the SDG-Tracker are collaborative efforts between researchers at the University of Oxford, who are the scientific editors of the website content; and the non-profit organization  Global Change Data Lab , who publishes and maintains the website and the data tools that make our work possible. At the University of Oxford we are based at the  Oxford Martin Programme on Global Development .
HOW DOES COVID-19 COMPARE TO THE SEASONAL FLU
Covid-19 Fatalities

Florida - 1,997
California - 3,321
New York - 28,480
Texas - 1,369
North Carolina - 693
New Jersey - 10,448
United States Total - 91,985

United States Total if NY & NJ Mirrored the Rest of the Country - 57,409

Vaccine - NO
Therapeutics - NO

Seasonal Flu deaths (10 yr CDC Average)

Florida - 1,907
California - 4,701
New York - 3,408
Texas - 2,413
North Carolina - 1,430
New Jersey - 944

United States Total - Up to 61,000/yr

Vaccine - YES
Therapeutics - YES


Democrats want a $915 billion budget bailout for states and cities, and the leading lobbyist is New York Governor Andrew Cuomo. His main public antagonist on the subject is Florida Senator and former Governor Rick Scott. Both men were first elected Governor in 2010, so let’s do the math to consider which state has managed its economy and finances better over the last decade.

In 2010 New York’s population of 19.378 million was larger than Florida’s 18.8 million. By mid-2019 Florida had grown to 21.48 million, according to the Census Bureau, while New York had barely increased to 19.453 million. Yet Mr. Cuomo recently signed a budget for fiscal 2021 of $177 billion that is even bigger than last year’s, papering over what was a $6 billion deficit before the coronavirus. Florida’s budget for fiscal 2021, not yet signed by new Governor Ron DeSantis, is expected to be about $93 billion.

Democrats in Albany are claiming to be victims of events that are out of their control. But they have increased spending by $43 billion since 2010—about $570,000 for each additional person. Florida’s budget has increased by $28 billion while its population has grown 2.7 million—a $10,400 increase per new resident.

***

New York has a top state-and-local tax rate of 12.7%, while Florida has no income tax. Yet New York has a growing budget deficit, while Mr. Scott inherited a large deficit but built a surplus and paid down state debt. The difference is spending.

New York’s spending on worker retirement benefits has nearly doubled since 2010 and is six times greater than Florida’s. Its debt-service payments have also doubled. Albany’s biggest cost driver is Medicaid, which gobbles up 40% of the state budget—twice as much as education. Florida spends about the same on schools as on Medicaid.

Blame New York’s cocktail of generous benefits, loose eligibility standards and waste. New York spends about twice as much per Medicaid beneficiary and six times more on nursing homes as Florida though its elderly population is 20% smaller. Many New York nursing homes and hospitals are organized by unions, which use their political clout to drive generous pay and benefits.

Mr. Cuomo in 2014 expanded Medicaid as part of ObamaCare to able-bodied individuals earning up to 133% of the poverty line. Florida didn’t. While the federal government initially picked up 100% of the ObamaCare expansion tab, New York is now on the hook for 10%, which contributed to this year’s $4 billion Medicaid shortfall.

New York spends about $76 billion a year on Medicaid—three times more than Florida. Swelling Medicaid costs have squeezed spending on transportation, causing Empire State trains and roads to fall into disrepair. Florida has found money to pave potholes and increased transportation spending 10 times more than New York between 2010 and 2019.

Mr. Cuomo pleads poverty by claiming New York is a “donor” state to the federal government. But federal dollars account for about 35.9% of New York’s spending compared to 32.8% of Florida’s, according to the Tax Foundation. New Yorkers pay more in federal taxes than what Albany gets back because the progressive federal tax code hits high earners the hardest and New York still has many high earners. The “donors” are individuals, and the money isn’t Mr. Cuomo’s.

In any case, many high earners are moving to lower-tax states. New York lost $9.6 billion in adjusted gross income to other states in 2018 while Florida gained $16 billion. Workers are following jobs, and vice versa.

The rate of private job growth in Florida has been about 60% higher than in New York from January 2010 to January 2020. Finance jobs expanded by 25% in Florida compared to 9.7% in New York. By our calculations, New York would generate $10 billion more annually in tax revenue if its personal income had grown at the rate of Florida’s over the last decade.

New York’s future has been discounted before, but the coronavirus may be its most serious economic challenge. Many service businesses are learning they don’t need as many workers in the office and can save money by downsizing. Morgan Stanley has said it intends to reduce office space in New York City, and Twitter has told employees they can work remotely as long as they want. Many restaurants were struggling before the coronavirus due to New York’s high minimum wage, taxes, rents and suffocating regulation. Some may now close permanently.

***

Mr. Cuomo no doubt realizes all this, which is why last week he cited a repeal of the $10,000 limit on the state-and-local tax deduction as his top request from Congress to keep more high earners from leaving. He also wants $61 billion in budget relief, which the Empire Center’s E.J. McMahon notes would cover projected deficits for four years assuming spending increases by 4% annually.

The policy question is why taxpayers in Florida and other well-managed states should pay higher taxes to rescue an Albany political class that refuses to restrain its tax-and-spend governance. Public unions soak up an ever-larger share of tax dollars, but Albany refuses to change. Mr. Scott is right.


We have a meme up at PragerU: "'Until it's safe' means 'never.'"

The pursuit of "safe" over virtually all other considerations is life-suppressing. This is true for your own individual life, and it is true for the life of a society.

I always give the following example: I have been taking visitors to Israel for decades, and for all those decades, people have called my radio show to say, "Dennis, I would so love to visit Israel, but I'm just going to wait until it's safe." And I've always told these people, "Then you'll never go." And sure enough, I've gone there over 20 times, and they never went.


If they are honest, historians judging the American experience during the coronavirus pandemic will excoriate our barbaric failure to protect the elderly. We think of ourselves as civilized, but mindless policies and bureaucratic indifference turned many nursing homes and rehabilitation centers into killing fields.

At least 28,000 residents and workers in long-term care facilities already have died from the ­virus, according to a New York Times analysis done more than a week ago. That represented one out of every three COVID-19 deaths recorded in the United States at the time and was likely an undercount because of reporting lags and varying state methods.

This massacre of a helpless population shames America and Washington must find out why it happened and who is responsible. Elderly people in these institutions could not protect themselves, and because most states banned visitors early in the outbreak, the institutions, their regulators and elected officials were fully obligated to shield them against infection.

They failed miserably.

The Times found 14 states where more than half of total deaths occurred in facilities for the elderly. It was 55 percent in Connecticut, 57 percent in Colorado, North Carolina and Kentucky, 58 percent in Virginia, 59 percent in Massachusetts, 61 percent in Delaware, 66 percent in Pennsylvania, 73 percent in Rhode Island and 80 percent in West Virginia and Minnesota. 


The first results from human trials of a vaccine against Covid-19 have given a glimmer of hope after a US firm’s study produced positive results in a group of eight volunteers.

These results – which come a day after the UK government revealed a deal to secure 30m doses of a rival Oxford University vaccine, should it be successful – showed that each of the participants produced an antibody response on a par with that seen in people who have had the disease. And they suggest that the vaccine is safe for use in humans.

Part of a first-stage trial of 45 people run by the US company Moderna, the results are from a preliminary safety study and do not demonstrate that the treatment will work. But they will be a sign of encouragement for experts and governments desperate for a breakthrough in the battle to bring an end to the coronavirus pandemic – widely believed to be impossible without a vaccine.


That’s selling short what is really taking place though. “Work From Home” is terrible branding, precisely because it fails to communicate the fundamental freedom that comes with these new policies. It’s not about further imprisoning us in our homes — it’s about empowering us to think and work exactly where we are personally most productive.

Yes, I know that most of us are sequestered in our humble abodes due to COVID-19, but long-term, the whole point of the flexibility that “Work From Home” provides is precisely that you can work from anywhere. It may be your home — but it may as well be a café, the hospital where a sick family member is located, a beach, a friend’s house, a hotel. The point of flexibility here is to untether our schedules and the stress associated with them and allow our work to happen where we want it to.

Many of us will choose to work from home, and many of us will habitually return to the same working environment each day even if it isn’t our home. That’s fine. Flexibility doesn’t mean constantly changing everything up — it means we can change things when we want and need to.

One big question that has loomed over “Work From Home” policies is this: What if I like my office and the social life of meeting with colleagues? Again, we see the narrowness of the language. “Work From Anywhere” literally means anywhere, including the very office we would normally commute to.


The coronavirus outbreak projection model that predicted more than 2 million U.S. deaths has been deemed "totally unreliable" by experts who have examined its coding, Fox News reported. 

The model programmed by Neil Ferguson of the United Kingdom's Imperial College helped convince the governments of the United States and the United Kingdom to implement severe lockdowns to slow the spread of the virus, and the frightening projections the model created also motivated public support of such measures early on.

But the Imperial College model appears incapable of meeting even the lowest scientific standards. If scientists run the model two times with the same data, it produces different results.


The U.S. auto industry slowly returned to life on Monday, with some vehicle assembly plants reopening. Suppliers geared up to support a sector that employs nearly 1 million people.

On a chilly and damp morning, hundreds of workers at Fiat Chrysler Automobile’s (FCA) truck plant in Warren, Michigan, began lining up before 4 a.m. to start the 5 a.m. shift. Signs overhead read: “Let’s restart.”

...Some potential good news in the global race for a vaccine helped U.S. stocks rise nearly 3% in morning trading.