Presented By
FACES & PLACES POW                                                                                  
Last week, Vision members attended the Young Visionaries Luncheon at Blue Mesa Grill with M2G Ventures, a company specializing in development, investment and storytelling. Founders (and twin sisters) Susan Gruppi and Jessica Worman shared their story - their experiences as entrepreneurs, how they got started, how they chose their geese and golden egg logo, and what the future holds for their commercial real estate company.

To view more photos of this event, click here

From left: Susan Gruppi; Vision FW Chair Katie Anderson, Broude Smith Jennings & McGlinchey PC; Jessica Worman.
 

PRESS YOUR LUCKPrizes
Click on the links below to enter for prizes

Mommie dearest: Raegan Bell, an owner at Bell Brothers Moving, has three teens. They still will be seen with parents, especially if it is for restaurant food. Which leads to Raegan's story: "We were leaving a restaurant next door to one of The Velvet Box stores," she said. "I tell my teens to wait in the car while dad and I run into the store. Their faces! One of the joys of raising three teens is getting to embarrass the heck out of them!" The bell counting down to Mother's Day is tolling and Marcelle LeBlanc has her stores stocked with adult fashion and fun. Whether you have teens or not, whether it's for your mom or yourownself, you'll want to win one of these two $50 gift cards.

Get your tee time: The week before the Fort Worth Invitational, the Chamber and Colonial Country Club hold a golf gab lesson at the club as part of the Chamber's Sports Series, sponsored by Ciera Bank. A PGA tour player will be interviewed and offer insight into a golfer's life / lifestyle. Usually some interesting and funny stories. What isn't known until days before the May 15 luncheon is which golfer. What is known is that the Fort Worth PGA Tour stop in 2017 generated $13 million for dozens of local charities. With the leftover shekels, there is a seat provided for four good sports.

Scouting this event: On May 16 at the Fort Worth Club, when the Girl Scouts of Texas Oklahoma Plains honor its 2018 Women of Distinction -- Marilyn Nance, Heather Stark, J.R. Labbe and Shay Dial Johnson -- a bit of local history will be made. Brain Happel, Fort Worth Market CEO for BBVA, will be the organization's first Man Enough to be a Girl Scout honoree. Brian helped sell 11,217 cookie boxes this year, but he's being honored for standing with girls to become women of courage and character, encouraging them to dream outside the (cookie) box and to make a difference in the world. This award, coincidentally, is endorsed by the National Football League Players Association and Happel was a punter for the New York Jets. Keynoter is Olympic Gold Medalist swimmer Dana Vollmer. Glenda (no relation to Rita) Moreno sent over a seat for two readers.

Horrible Bosses 2: A recent global study by Dale Carnegie found that only 17 percent of employees are satisfied in their job and 45 percent of employees are planning on leaving their job within the next 12 months. Mr. B didn't realize there were so many bosses similar to hisownself's boss, Miserly Mistress. So, Dale Carnegie North Texas, the Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce, the Fort Worth Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Metropolitan Black Chamber of Commerce are teaming to present Uncovering Leadership Blind Spots: Culture in the Workplace. It is Thursday May 17 from 7:30-10 a.m. at the Fort Worth Club and the business briefing will identify the leadership attributes critical to organizational performance, discuss the advantages of a diverse workforce, and find out what you and your leaders may be missing. MaryAnn Means-Dufrene sent over a spot for two readers.

Congratulations to the April 25th Prize Winners: 
  • Leslie Shields, HealthMarkets
  • Karen Holcomb, Northern Realty Group
  • Angelica Douglas, Freese and Nichols
  • Justin Riddle, Elan River District
  • Susan Siemsen, Baylor Scott White Health
  •  
GOLD SPONSORS


HE SAID, SHE SAID, THEY SAIDSoundBytes
Doc's four-year cure: Doc Anthony Edwards knows talent. How about George Clooney, Noah Wylie, Eriq LaSalle and Julianne Marguiles from his ER television days? That crew could Fortify any Chamber breakfast or luncheon. After exiting stage left from an acting career, Edwards went schooling within Fort Worth ISD, among others, and was at Tarleton State University as Assistant Professor and Director of Global Campus Outreach before the Chamber selected him as Senior Vice President of Talent Development, Retention, and Attraction. The Chamber's four-year goals for Doc Edwards? A five-percent increase in population age 25+ with a bachelor's degree, five-percent increase in population with post-secondary degrees, licenses or certifications, and 10-percent increase in targeted industries' talent supply. To learn more about our newest addition to the team, click here.

Joined Chamber, got a husband: Leslie Shields, HealthMarkets agent, met Christopher Botvidson, owner of Ascend Concepts, while doing business about eight years ago. Started dating three years ago and will be married in October. "When I moved to Fort Worth, Chris encouraged me to join the Chamber because it had done so much for Ascend," Leslie said. "We met our realtor to buy our first home, our bankers, our wedding planner and contractors all through the Chamber. Now we just need a food truck for the wedding!"

Finding an extra hour in the day: Commerical realtor Chad Snyder, with Colliers International, says he lost a bit of morning work time with the birth of his daughter. Says he gained it back by bringing lunch to work and making calls during the lunch hour. He offered another McNugget of advice: "Can't eat chips when you're on the phone."

A few good men: Karl Giere, Zebra Crossing, has a 24-year-old son, Preston, who is "non-verbal." Karl jokes tenderly that "Preston and I are men of few words."

Digital divide: Not everything is going digital at warp speed. Lamar Advertising General Manager Rick Jensen says Lamar has 150,000 static billboards and 2,900 digital. And adding only about 100 digital a year.

Raining on the parade: Patrick Tyler, owner of Cimarron Window-Door + Remodeling, has a warning about silicon dioxide ion coatings for windows. Supposedly, rain water hitting the window washes away the dirt. Nirvana, right? "It doesn't work as advertised," Patrick says.
"I'm very smart. And humility is my best asset."   

-- A laughing Sandra Houston
Trinity Habitat for Humanity
    
High School Peyton Place? Red Sanders and Red Productions are previewing Sleeping in Plastic for moviegoers' thoughts before final edits. It is "a dark coming-of-age tale set in a Texas town, exploring the lives of high school lovers as they intertwine and spiral violently out of control."

Big heart where the home is: Kirsten Ham is Director of Business Development, hired right out of TCU, to build social enterprise programs for Clean Slate, part of the True Worth Place / Presbyterian Night Shelter umbrella. She is key to the business creation, and the marketing and entrepreneurial force behind it. The focus is getting jobs for the homeless; Clean Slate owns staffing and janitorial businesses, rents kitchen and office space, and picks up litter for the City of Fort Worth. Trailing 12 months revenue is about $500,000 at an eight percent margin. The jobs, with benefits and transportation provided, help get the homeless out of the shelters. There are drug tests and criminal checks.

Over here, over there: Fort Worth Country Day has launched its Center for International Studies, the home base for overseas summer expeditions, exchange opportunities, cultural programs and international professional development. This summer, FWCD students will be headed to Costa Rica, Spain and Italy. FWCD hosts international students during the academic year through partnerships with Fort Worth Sister Cities.

And lastly ... : A holographic last will and testament is one that is handwritten. Matt Davidson, estate attorney with Davidson Law Group, got his first recently ... and it was in Spanish. Matt says a holographic will has to be handwritten; it can't be typed or a recorded version.
MARK YOUR CALENDARS
Sponsored By

2018 BOOK OF LISTS AVAILABLE!resources
The 2018 Book of Lists have arrived in our office!  Compiled and published annually by the Fort Worth Business Press, this directory includes lists of top companies in more than 60 industries in Tarrant and Denton counties.

Order a copy for only $95 (members only) from our eCommerce store here (normally $225). Members need to login with member ID to receive member pricing on all publications.

Email Katie Kassler or call 817-338-3377 to schedule pickup or for more information. See more of our publications in our online store.
 
For sponsorship inquiries in B2B Insider, contact Jennifer Vuduris or call (817) 338-3335

You are receiving the Fort Worth Chamber's Newz-E-Letter because you are subscribed on fortworthchamber.com.
Please add mr.b@fortworthchamber.com to your Address Book or approved senders list to
ensure delivery of this email.