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Child and Dependent Care Credit
Summer Day Care Expenses Count too?!

Did you know that you can claim a federal income tax credit when you pay someone to care for your kids while you're at work or school? The Child and Dependent Care Credit is valuable because it reduces the amount of tax you owe dollar-for-dollar. Here's an overview of the rules:

● Child care expenses must be work-related. This requirement means you have to pay for child care so you can work or actively look for work. If you are married, you and your spouse must both work. Exceptions to this "earned income" rule include spouses who are full-time students or who are not able to care for themselves due to mental or physical limitations.

● Expenses generally must be paid for care children under the age of 13. However, expenses you pay to care for a physically or mentally disabled spouse or adult dependent may also count.

● Expenses must be paid to someone who is not your dependent. Amounts you pay your spouse, your child's parent (such as an ex-spouse), anyone claimed as a dependent on your tax return, or your own child age 18 or younger do not qualify for the credit. For example, if you pay your 17-year- old dependent child to watch a younger sibling, that expense doesn't count for purposes of claiming the credit.

● The care provider has to be identified on your tax return. You'll typically need to show the name, address, and taxpayer identification number. You can request this information by asking your provider to complete Form W-10, Dependent Care Provider's Identification and Certification.

● The amount you can claim depends on how much you spend for the care up to a dollar limit of $3,000 of expenses for one dependent and $6,000 for two or more dependents.
Contact JAG CPA LLC with questions on specific situations. We'll help you make the most of your federal income tax credits!



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