C&NN's Research Digest
  ARCHIVE        |       APRIL 2017
IN THIS ISSUE:
A curated selection of newly published research
Children's Voices
>Child-sensitive climate change adaptations are needed to support the coping mechanisms of Filipino children
>Engaging children and youth in open space planning produces meaningful outcomes
>Children play an active role in indigenous society's changing relationship with the environment
Early Childhood Education
>Early childhood pedagogy based on relationality rather than separation could resist an extractive relationship with the more-than-human world
Environmental Attitudes and Behaviors
>School-garden program promotes positive attitudes toward the environment
>Positive role models and mentors play an important role in promoting pro-environmental behaviors   
>Students who engage in gardening and lawn-care gain understanding and develop positive attitudes toward bees
Natural Playspaces
>Ditches have the potential to become an important design element in outdoor playspaces for young children
Neighborhoods 
and Parks
>Neighborhoods with poor access to a mix of local destinations are associated with increased screen time in girls
>Neighborhood green space is associated with better child mental wellbeing, but this relationship depends on who reports the data
>City residents look to urban parks to improve their quality of life
Pets & Animal Assisted Therapy
>Children with autism spectrum disorder show improved social interactions with pets after a therapeutic horseback riding intervention
>Pets promote child and adolescent development
Social Justice
>Learning for sustainability requires a social justice approach applicable to both humans and the more-than-human world
>Early childhood pedagogy based on relationality rather than separation could resist an extractive relationship with the more-than-human world

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Dear friends,

Children & Nature Network's Research Library achieved an important milestone recently. We published our 500 th article summary!  When our co-founder Richard Louv wrote Last Child in the Woods , he had only a couple dozen studies on which to base his arguments. We now review and summarize almost that many each month! 

As Rich said in response to this milestone, " It was part of our dream from the beginning to be the one place where anyone in the world could find the bulk of the research on this issue, to bring it out from behind the firewalls and make it useful to the people who need it most."  We hope you are enjoying access to the latest research from around the world.

Sincerely,
Cathy Jordan, PhD, LP
Consulting Research Director 
Children & Nature Network
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[ Children's Voices ]
Child-sensitive v1climate change adaptations are needed to support the coping mechanisms of Filipino children
Filipino children believe climate change is real and that it impacts their personal lives, with children from poor families being more negatively impacted than others.  This study calls attention to the need for climate-change adaptation at the household, community and city levels and highlights the importance of including children's voices in climate change discussions. |  Berse, 2017. Climate change from the lens of Malolos children: Perception, impact, and adaptation .   Access study
Engaging children and v2youth in open space planning produces meaningful outcomes
Children and youth (preschool through adolescence) helped to identify strategies for enhancing visitors' experience to one of Boulder, Colorado's popular open space areas.  Their feedback led to concrete changes to the city's plan for the area and convinced the city to allow for greater youth participation in future planning initiatives. |  Derr, Ruppi, & Wagner, 2016. Honoring voices, inspiring futures: Young people's engagement in open space planning.     Access study
Children play an v3active role in indigenous society's changing relationship with the environment
This ethnographic research conducted with Matses people in Peru focused on children's perspectives and activities in relation to the broader social and political-economic context of this indigenous community and the changing physical environment.  Through their "play-work" at the river, the children are helping to shape and influence the world in which they live. |  Morelli, 2017. The river echoes with laughter: A child-centered analysis of social change in Amazonia.   Access study
[ Early Childhood Education ]ec1
Early childhood pedagogy based on relationality rather than separation could resist an extractive relationship with the more-than-human world
This theoretical paper addresses concerns relating to the curriculum used in early childhood programs located on Indigenous Coast Salish territories in Canada and calls for a deeper examination of the curricular approach of nature/forest preschools. The author proposes a shift in focus from a human-centric to a more respectful relationship with the more-than-human world. |  Nxumalo, 2017. Geotheorizing mountain-child relations within anthropogenic inheritances.    Access study
[ Environmental Attitudes & Behaviors ]
School-garden ea1program promotes positive attitudes toward the environment
Second-grade students participated in a four-week study of insects which included hands-on experiences in the school garden.  Responses to surveys completed before and after the study indicated that, in addition to gaining knowledge about bees and other insects, students also experienced positive shifts in their environmental attitudes. | Fisher-Maltese, 2016. "We won't hurt you butterfly!" Second-graders become environmental stewards from experiences in a school garden.   Access study
Positive role models ea2and mentors play an important role in promoting pro-environmental behaviors
Social learning theory suggests that people learn behaviors by observing others.  Grounded in this theory, along with related research, this conceptual article examines the use of role models and mentors to promote positive environmental behaviors, as knowledge alone tends to be ineffective in changing the behavior of children and youth. |  Prince, 2017.  Outdoor experiences and sustainability.    Access study
Students who engageea3 in gardening and lawn-care gain understanding and develop positive attitudes toward bees
An exploration of adolescents' experience, knowledge, and attitudes in relation to bees demonstrated that adolescents were generally unaware of vital ecosystem services provided by bees. Those who engaged in gardening or lawn-care were more knowledgeable and had more positive attitudes toward bees.  School gardening and other outdoor activities could help adolescents gain in-depth knowledge about the natural world and promote positive attitudes and conservation behaviors. |  Silva & Minor, 2017. Adolescents' experience and knowledge of, and attitudes toward, bees: Implications and recommendations for conservation.     Access study
 [ Natural Playscapes ]np1
Ditches have the potential to become an important design element in outdoor playspaces for young children
An investigation of young children playing in ditches revealed a wealth of meaningful action possibilities afforded by ditches.  Ditches with different characteristics invited (or afforded) different play activities with both boys and girls being actively involved.  This paper includes ideas on how ditches can be incorporated into children's playspaces in safe and manageable ways. |  Lerstrup & Moller, 2016. Affordances of ditches for preschool children.   Access study
 [ Neighborhoods & Parks  ]
Neighborhoods n1with poor access to a mix of local destinations are associated with increased screen time in girls
This study linked children and youth screen-time data with information about neighborhood destinations, such as shops, parks, and libraries. Girls with access to a mix of youth-related destinations participated in almost two hours less weekly screen time than girls with little or no access to such destinations. |  Christian, et al. 2017. Nowhere to go and nothing to do but sit? Youth screen time and the association with access to neighborhood destinations .   Access study
Neighborhood green n2space is associated with better child mental wellbeing, but this relationship depends on who reports the data
Three groups -- parents, teachers, and children - completed an assessment of the child's mental wellbeing.  Children living in greener neighborhoods exhibited fewer signs of emotional symptoms, conduct problems, hyperactivity, and peer problems. The results, however, differed across the three groups, with parent reports showing the strongest association between neighborhood green space and child mental wellbeing. |  Feng & Astell-Burt, 2017. The relationship between neighbourhood green space and child mental wellbeing depends upon whom you ask: Multilevel evidence from 3083 children aged 12-13 years.     Access Study
City residents n3look to urban parks to improve their quality of life
This study investigated the relationship between urban parks and the quality of life for citizens of an Iranian city.  The main reasons given for visiting parks included spending time with family and friends, enjoying the peaceful environment, and providing recreational facilities for children. These results applied to city residents of differing social status and age groups. |  Teymouri, Ghorbani, & Hojjati, 2017. Investigation of the relationship between public green space and urban life quality.  
 [ Pets & Assisted Animal Therapy ]
Children with autism p1spectrum disorder show improved social interactions with pets after a therapeutic horseback riding intervention

Two groups of children with autism spectrum disorder participated in this study. One group completed a therapeutic horseback riding (THR) intervention program; the other completed a barn-only (no horse) program. The THR group showed improved interactions with pets after the intervention; the other group did not. |  Petty, et al. 2017. Therapeutic horseback riding crossover effects of attachment behaviors with family pets in a sample of children with autism spectrum disorder.    Access study
Pets promote child p2and adolescent development

This systematic literature review examined the research on the impact of pets on childhood and adolescent development. Most studies focused on emotional health and provided strong evidence of pets having positive impacts on self-esteem and loneliness, especially for children under 6 and over 10 years old. Pets also promoted cognitive, behavioral, educational and social development. | 
Purewal et al, 2017. Companion animals and child/adolescent development: A systematic review of the evidence.     Access study
 [ Social Justice ]
Learning for sustainability sj1requires a social justice approach applicable to both humans and the more-than-human world
Is it logically possible to work for both global justice and ecological sustainability? This theoretical essay presents the argument that it's not only possible, but necessary if we are to live well in the world. What's needed is an approach that brings human flourishing and ecological concerns together as two parts of a single concern for social justice. |  Griffiths & Murray, 2017. Love and social justice in learning for sustainability.     Access study
Early childhood pedagogy sj2based on relationality rather than separation could resist an extractive relationship with the more-than-human world
This theoretical paper addresses concerns relating to the curriculum used in early childhood programs located on Indigenous Coast Salish territories in Canada and calls for a deeper examination of the curricular approach of nature/forest preschools. The author proposes a shift in focus from a human-centric to a more respectful relationship with the more-than-human world. | 
Nxumalo, 2017. Geotheorizing mountain-child relations within anthropogenic inheritances.   Access study
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