C&NN's Research Digest
  ARCHIVE        |       MAY  2017
IN THIS ISSUE:
A curated selection of newly published research
Education
>Teaching methods, school policy and green elements are associated with positive environmental education outcomes
>Integrating cognitive and emotional goals in educational program may foster affinity toward nature
>Nurturing a sense of wonder is thought to be vital to developing an ethic of care for the environment
>Sustainable school design may promote students' pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors
Environmental Attitudes and Behaviors
>Childhood experiences with nature may influence later-life attitudes toward problem-causing wildlife
>Teaching methods, school policy, and green elements are associated with positive environmental education outcomes
>Integrating cognitive and emotional goals in educational program may foster affinity toward nature
>Nurturing a sense of wonder is thought to be vital to developing an ethic of care for the environment
>Sustainable school design may promote students' pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors
Outdoor Classrooms/ Green Schoolyards
>Children and families experience dietary benefits of school gardens
>Preschool children used richer language in a natural environment than in indoor or outdoor classrooms
Plant Knowledge
>Patagonian children's plant knowledge is highly influenced by plants and plant-related activities in their immediate environments
Asthma
>Prior findings of neighborhood greenness's protective effect against asthma may not have considered differing asthma phenotypes
Physical Activity
>Family-centered program increased self-report of outdoor physical activity
>Parks can support physical activity of ethnically and economically diverse families
>Improved maintenance, marketing and messaging may promote physical activity in parks
Risk Management
>Forest school educators respond to competing conceptions of childhood and risk
Urban Planning
>Environmental health research highlights the need to target green space interventions to multiple-user groups
The Research Library and Digest are provided with support from:


 


Dear friends,

In mid-April, we were thrilled to welcome nearly 900 people from 22 countries to our International Children & Nature Network Conference in Vancouver, BC.  For the first time, we offered a research track titled "Making the Case: Advancing the evidence base for the children and nature movement," featuring an action lab focused on effective translation, dissemination and activation of the evidence for connecting kids and families to nature. During this action lab and throughout the conference, a wealth of creative ideas and connections were generated that will benefit conference attendees -- and enrich C&NN's research agenda. 

If you attended, thank you for being part of the world's largest gathering devoted to connecting children to the natural world.  If you couldn't attend, check out highlights and keynote addresses on our website.

Sincerely,
Cathy Jordan, PhD, LP
Consulting Research Director 
Children & Nature Network
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Vancouver area students enjoyed the Bienenstock 
Pop-Up Nature Park featured during our conference.
[ Education ]
Teaching methods, ed1school policy and green elements are associated with positive environmental education outcomes
This research explored student outcome differences in relation to specific characteristics of the schools where they attended. Desired student learning outcomes were associated with more active teaching methods, the making of environmental education policy in the schools, and the presence and use of natural green elements at the school campuses. |  Boeve-de Pauw & Van Petegem, 2017. Eco-school evaluation beyond labels: The impact of environmental policy, didactics and nature at school on student outcomes
Access study
Integrating ed2cognitive and emotional goals in educational program may foster affinity toward nature
This study measured emotional responses to nature before and after a three-week honey bee educational program integrating cognitive and emotional goals. Biophilic scores - as measured by two connectedness to nature scales and as indicated by students' drawings - showed that children's affinity for nature was greater after the program than before. |  Cho & Lee, 2017. 'Love honey, hate honey bees': Reviving biophilia of elementary school students through environmental education program.   
Nurturing a ed3sense of wonder is thought to be vital to developing an ethic of care for the environment
Mainstream education for sustainable development tends to present nature as a resource or commodity.  In this theoretical paper, an alternate approach, based on the view of humans as being a part of the natural world, is purported to foster intimacy and connection with nature through place-based, multi-sensory experiences. |  Selby, 2017. Education for sustainable development, nature, and vernacular learning.   Access study
Sustainable ed4school design may promote students' pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors
Children attending one of three schools designed for sustainability had significantly higher pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors than children attending one of four conventionally-designed comparison schools. The biggest difference was in attitudes towards education for sustainability. |  Tucker & Izadpanahi, 2017. Live green, think green: Sustainable school architecture and children's environmental attitudes and behaviors.     Access study
[ Environmental Attitudes & Behaviors ]
Childhood ea1experiences with nature may influence later-life attitudes toward problem-causing wildlife
Through structural equation modeling to identify relationships among variables, researchers found that experience with nature had a greater influence on tolerance for problem-causing animals than did sociodemographic factors when animals had not caused any problems. When the animals had caused problems, however, the effect was only indirect via promoting positive attitudes toward wildlife. |  Hosaka, Sugimoto, & Numata, 2017. Effects of childhood experience with nature on tolerance of urban residents toward hornets and wild boars in Japan .   Access study
Teaching methods, ea2school policy and green elements are associated with positive environmental education outcomes
This research explored student outcome differences in relation to specific characteristics of the schools where they attended. Desired student learning outcomes were associated with more active teaching methods, the making of environmental education policy in the schools, and the presence and use of natural green elements at the school campuses. |  Boeve-de Pauw & Van Petegem, 2017. Eco-school evaluation beyond labels: The impact of environmental policy, didactics and nature at school on student outcomes.    Access study
Integrating cognitive ea3and emotional goals in educational program may foster affinity toward nature
This study measured emotional responses to nature before and after a three-week honey bee educational program integrating cognitive and emotional goals.  Biophilic scores - as measured by two connectedness to nature scales and as indicated by students' drawings - showed that children's affinity for nature was greater after the program than before. |  Cho & Lee, 2017. 'Love honey, hate honey bees': Reviving biophilia of elementary school students through environmental education program.    
Nurturing a sense ea4of wonder is thought to be vital to developing an ethic of care for the environment
Mainstream education for sustainable development tends to present nature as a resource or commodity.  In this theoretical paper, an alternate approach, based on the view of humans as being a part of the natural world, is purported to foster intimacy and connection with nature through place-based, multi-sensory experiences. |  Selby, 2017. Education for sustainable development, nature, and vernacular learning Access study
Sustainable school ea5design may promote students' pro-environmental 
attitudes and behaviors
Children attending one of three schools designed for sustainability had significantly higher pro-environmental attitudes and behaviors than children attending one of four conventionally-designed comparison schools. The biggest difference was in attitudes towards education for sustainability. |  Tucker & Izadpanahi, 2017. Live green, think green: Sustainable school architecture and children's environmental attitudes and behaviors.     Access Study
 [ Outdoor Classrooms/Green Schoolyards ]
Children and families o1experience dietary benefits of school gardens
Parents and teachers interviewed about their perception of the benefits of their school's garden indicated that the garden at the elementary school promoted reflection on the act of eating, led to healthier diets, increased knowledge of foods and the food system, and increased motivation to try new foods.  These benefits applied to both children and families. |  Garcia, Coelho, & Bogus, 2017. Pedagogical school gardens as a Food and Nutrition Education strategy: Perception of parents and educators of their impact on children's diets.   Access Study
Preschool children o2used richer language in a natural environment than in indoor or outdoor classrooms
This case study compared the qualities of young children's utterances in three different learning environments: an indoor classroom, an outdoor classroom, and a natural environment. Findings indicated that the environment and interactions in the environment affected children's use of language. Children used richer language in the natural environment than in the other two environments. | Richardson & Murray, 2017. Are young children's utterances affected by characteristics of their learning environments? A multiple case study.    Access Study
 [ Plant Knowledge  ]
Patagonian children's p1plant knowledge is highly influenced by plants and plant-related activities in their immediate environment
Children from three different Patagonian environments participated in semi-structured interviews focusing on their knowledge of local plants. Plant knowledge tended to be influenced not only by formal education but also by the school's environmental setting, family customs, traditions, and values. |  Eyssartier, Margutti, & Lozada, 2017. Plant knowledge in children who inhabit diverse socio ecological environments in northwestern Patagonia.     Access study
 [ Asthma ]
Prior findings of asth1neighborhood greenness's protective effect against asthma may not have considered differing asthma phenotypes

By studying trajectories of childhood asthma and characteristics of children's neighborhoods, researchers found that traffic-related air pollution increased the probability of a chronic asthma trajectory; neighborhood greenness had no effect, positive or negative, on chronic or acute asthma.  Earlier research that demonstrated protective effects of neighborhood greenness did not distinguish between trajectory subgroups. |  Sbihi et al. 2017. Asthma trajectories in a population-based birth cohort. Impacts of air pollution and greenness.     Access study
 [ Physical Activity  ]
Family-centered pa1program increased self-report of outdoor physical activity
Families who participated in an outdoor-focused program reported that they increased their total time per week being active together outdoors (usually in parks and the neighborhood) and that each outdoor activity was longer. Parents were also more likely to be active and to encourage their children to be active. |  Flynn et al. 2017. Active Families in the Great Outdoors: A program to promote family outdoor physical activity.   Access study
Parks can pa2support physical activity of ethnically and economically diverse families
Parent surveys were used to examine park use and nonuse among ethnically and economically diverse families living in a large US city. Findings indicated that parks might best support physical activity for diverse families when activity features are carefully planned and equitably distributed across parks. |  Greer, Castrogivanni, & Marcello, 2017. Park use and physical activity among mostly low-to-middle income, minority parents and their children   Access study
Improved pa3maintenance, marketing and messaging may promote physical 
activity in parks
In focus groups of adult and youth park users' perceptions affecting their park use and park-based physical activity in low-income neighborhoods, participants cited a wide range of motivations, normative beliefs, and facilitators and constraints to park-based physical activity.  Motivations for park use included social interaction, solitude, and nature appreciation. Findings can inform how park professionals promote park use. |  Groshong et al. 2017. Exploring attitudes, perceived norms, and personal agency: Insights into theory-based messages to encourage park-based physical activity in low-income urban neighborhoods.   Access study
 [ Risk Management  ]
Forest school educators rm1respond to competing conceptions of childhood and risk
Focus group discussions with forest school teachers revealed how risk perception shapes and is shaped by their understandings of childhood, pedagogy, and their own professional identity.  Teachers cited parental concerns and risk-averse institutional procedures and protocols as factors influencing their risk-management practices. |  Connolly & Haughton, 2017. The perception, management and performance of risk amongst Forest School educators. Access study
 [ Urban Planning  ]
Environmental up1health research highlights the need to target green space interventions to multiple-user groups
This review of the literature presents research evidence linking human health, well-being and green space using a life-course approach.  Research findings were then used to develop a framework for planning and designing green spaces in urban environments that meet the varying needs of people across all life-course stages. |  Douglas, Lennon, & Scott, 2017. Green space benefits for health and well-being: A life-course approach to urban planning, design and management.   Access study
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