C&NN's Research Digest

NOVEMBER 2016  

IN THIS ISSUE:
Education
>Understanding biodiversity is rooted in childhood engagement with nature

>Mobile application is effective in connecting children to nature

>
Community-school partnerships enhance environmental education for youth

Families
Health
Mental Health
Cognition
Play

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of the Research Digest are archived in our Research Library

 ________________

The 2017 Children & Nature International
Conference 
will feature a track 
on advancing the evidence base for children and nature.    
Thank you!

During this season of thanks and celebration, we want to acknowledge all you do to connect children, families and communities to nature. The work of parents, educators, researchers, healthcare providers, policy makers and civic and community leaders like you is key to creating a world in which all children benefit from nature in their everyday lives. 

Each month, this Research Digest will alert you to additions to our Research Librarywhich contains 470+ studies curated to help you make the case for increased nature connections.  
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You may unsubscribe at any time with the SafeUnsubscribe™ option at the bottom of the page.)

Please tell us what you think about our Research Library and Digest so that we can continue to improve our efforts to advance the evidence base for children and nature.

Best regards,
Cathy Jordan
Consulting Research Director 
Children & Nature Network
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[ Education ]
ed1
Integration and shared analysis of data from two different studies find childhood interaction with living and non-living elements of nature important to learning about biodiversity. |  Beery & Jørgensen. Children in nature: Sensory engagement and the experience of biodiversity
ed2
A study testing the efficacy of a mobile application in increasing connectedness to nature found this use of technology to be just as effective, but more fun, as other strategies used in non-formal environmental education settings. |  Crawford, Holder & O'Connor. Using mobile technology to engage children with nature.   Access Study
ed3
Schools partnering with community agencies provide opportunities for youth to gain knowledge, action competence, community skills, and efficacy, while also helping agency partners meet their conservation goals. |  Monroe et al. Agencies, educators, communities and wildfire: Partnerships to enhance environmental education for youth
Access study
ed4
A study comparing the behavioral-related outcomes of two different environmental education programs found that a higher level of intensity is more likely to promote "stronger" environmental behaviors. |  Shay-Margalit & Rubin. Effect of the Israeli "Green Schools" reform on pupils' environmental attitudes and behavior
ed5
A recent survey indicates that at least 17.9% of all public schools and 19.4% of all independent and private schools in Denmark practice udeskole (outdoor learning). This represents an increase since 2007 when approximately 14% of public and private/independent schools were practicing udeskole on a weekly or biweekly basis. |  Barford et al. Increased provision of udeskole in Danish schools: An updated national population survey
 [ Families ]
family1
A belief in nature's innate health-promoting effect was insufficient in explaining why Norwegian families go hiking in nature.  Rather, families find nature a peaceful background for experiencing the family as a social institution. |  Baklien, Ytterhus, & Bongaardt. When everyday life becomes a storm on the horizon: Families' experiences of good mental health while hiking in nature
 [ Health ]
health1
This review provides evidence of loose parts having a positive influence on children.  The true extent of this influence, however -- particularly in the promotion of physical activity and physical literacy -- is still unknown. | Houser et al. Let the children play: Scoping review on the implementation and use of loose parts for promoting physical activity participation
he2
Individual rather than group differences were found in the activity levels of children on two differently designed playgrounds.  Some children were more active on traditional playgrounds; others more active on natural playgrounds, suggesting playgrounds should be designed with diverse play preferences in mind. | Luchs & Fikus. Differently designed playgrounds and preschoolers' physical activity play  
he3
Three case studies illustrate how the Ecosystem Approach to Health (ecohealth) can improve human health and well-being while also fostering ecosystem health and environmental sustainability. | Bunch. Ecosystem approaches to health and well-being: Navigating complexity, promoting health in social-ecological systems
he4
Data from both mothers and children indicate that Korean children with less access to outdoor physical activity outlets were more likely to engage in more sedentary behaviors and those exposed to a high density of fast food outlets were significantly more likely to consume fast food than other children. | Choo, Kim, & Park. Neighborhood environments: Links to health behaviors and obesity status in vulnerable children
he5
A review of the research focusing on asthma in urban communities found that asthma rates were significantly higher for African American and Puerto Rican children and for children living in poverty than other groups of children. | DePriest & Butz. Neighborhood-level factors related to asthma in children living in urban areas: An integrative literature review
he6
This paper highlights nine evidence-based initiatives that, if implemented in a comprehensive and coordinated way, could improve the fitness and health of young people. Though this article is not specifically about the role of nature, the importance of equitable access to such physical activity facilities as neighborhood parks is addressed by one or more of the initiatives. | Pate, Flynn, & Dowda. Policies for promotion of physical activity and prevention of obesity in adolescence
 [ Mental Health ]
menhe1
Self-report data from 659 adolescents was used to examine trajectories and predictors of change, as well as post-treatment outcomes, of an outdoor behavioral health program.  Results indicated dramatic positive changes for the participants, with greater rates of change for adolescents with mood or anxiety disorders. | Combs et al. Adolescent self-assessment of an outdoor behavioral health program: Longitudinal outcomes and trajectories of change
 [ Cognition ]
cog1
Literature review points to association between long-term exposure to green space and cognition
Studies indicate that greenness can positively influence cognitive development in childhood and cognitive function in adulthood. |  de Keijzer et al. Long-term green space exposure and cognition across the life course: A systematic review
 [ Play  ]
play1
Influence of loose parts on physical activity warrants further investigation
This review provides evidence for loose parts having a positive influence on children.  The true extent of this influence, however -- particularly in the promotion of physical activity and physical literacy -- is still unknown. | Houser et al. Let the children play: Scoping review on the implementation and use of loose parts for promoting physical activity participation
play2
Physical activity levels examined during play on natural vs. traditional playgrounds
No significant group differences were found in the activity levels of children on two differently designed playgrounds. There were differences, however, for individual children: some children are more active on traditional playgrounds; others more active on natural playgrounds.  Luchs & Fikus. Differently designed playgrounds and preschoolers' physical activity play
play3
Various factors influence decisions about outdoor play for children with disabilities
This review identified a variety of barriers and enablers to the participation of children with disabilities in outdoor play.  Many of the same factors were seen as either barriers or enablers depending on the environment and the people involved. | Sterman et al. Outdoor play decisions by caregivers of children with disabilities: A systematic review of qualitative studies
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