BRIAN T. STONER, CPA  

  You can count on us to count for you!

SELECTED TO THE FORBES TOP 100 MUST-FOLLOW TAX TWITTER ACCOUNTS FOR 2018 
Forbes Top 100 Must-Follow Tax Twitter Accounts for 2018

Award for Best Accountant in Burbank, CA by Best Businesses - 2016, 2015 and 2014

Received the American Registry Award for Best Accountant of OF 2017

Picked by Expertise.com as one of top 20 Tax Services in Los Angeles for 2018 & 2017
December 24, 2018      

                   


 

 We Need Your Referrals to Grow Our Business!
Accounting Background
 
  EMAIL NOW AT  bstonercpa@sbcglobal.net
  
2600 W. Olive Ave, 5th Floor
Burbank, CA 91505

 
I write a BLOG  called 'MUSINGS OF A BURBANK CPA' on Financial and Tax Items I feel are worth sharing!  You can access
MY BLOG here:
 
 


Receive My Current Newsletter by Email:


See the coupon for discounts on my services  -------->  


HOPE YOU HAVE A
 HAPPY HOLIDAY SEASON!

LET'S TAKE A LOOK AT THE HISTORY OF BOTH RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER AND SANTA CLAUS
 
 This week to celebrate Christmas I looked into the history of two Christmas legends, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and that jolly elf, Santa Claus. Here are their stories (just like in Dragnet!)
     

Call Now
818-333-5095 or 818-317-6035 
  
  
Email  me at
Check out my website at    www.briantstonercpa.com
                                                                             
 Follow me on Twitter       View my profile on LinkedIn        Like me on Facebook


  
Brian T. Stoner, CPA has been featured on
  

 

        


You can count on us to count for you!




  

 

 

 

                    
 
The History of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

Now a Christmas icon, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer was created by a department store adman enduring a great personal tragedy 75 years ago. See this article by Christopher Klein written December 19, 2014 in History for the full story:
 
 
Balsam wreaths and visions of sugarplums had barely faded in the first weeks of 1939, but thoughts inside the Chicago headquarters of retail giant Montgomery Ward had already turned to the next Christmas 11 months away. The retailer had traditionally purchased and distributed coloring books to children as a holiday promotion, but the advertising department decided it would be cheaper and more effective instead to develop its own Christmas-themed book in-house.

The assignment fell to Robert May, a copywriter with a knack for turning a limerick at the company's holiday party. The adman, however, had difficulty summoning up holiday cheer, and not just because of the date on the calendar. Not only was the United States still trying to shake the decade-long Great Depression while the rumblings of war grew once again Europe, but May's wife was suffering with cancer and the medical bills had thrown the family into debt. Sure, he was pursuing his passion to write, but churning out mail order catalog copy about men's shirts instead of penning the Great American Novel was not what he had envisioned himself doing at age 33 with a degree from Dartmouth College.

Given the assignment to develop an animal story, May thought a reindeer was a natural for the leading role (not to mention that his 4-year-old daughter, Barbara, loved the reindeers every time she visited the zoo). As he peered out at the thick fog that had drifted off Lake Michigan, May came up with the idea of a misfit reindeer ostracized because of his luminescent nose who used his physical abnormality to guide Santa's sleigh and save Christmas. Seeking an alliterative name, May scribbled possibilities on a scrap of paper - Rollo, Reginald, Rodney and Romeo were among the choices-before circling his favorite, Rudolph.  
 




                                          



As May worked on "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" through the summer, his wife's health worsened. She passed away in July, 1939. Now a widower and a single father, May refused the offer of his boss to give the assignment to someone else.
"I needed Rudolph now more than ever," he later wrote. Burying his grief, May finished the story in August.

The 89 rhyming couplets in "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" borrow from Clement Clarke Moore's "A Visit from St. Nicholas" right from the story's opening line: "Twas the day before Christmas, and all through the hills/The reindeer were playing...enjoying the spills." Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale "The Ugly Duckling" also inspired the storyline as did May's own childhood when he endured taunts from schoolmates for being small and shy. "Rudolph and I were something alike," the copywriter told Guideposts magazine in January 1975. "As a child I'd always been the smallest in the class. Frail, poorly coordinated, I was never asked to join the school teams."

Those familiar with only the 1964 animated television version of "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," which remains the longest-running Christmas special in television history a half-century after its debut on NBC, might not recognize the original tale. There is no Hermey the elf, no Abominable Snow Monster, not even the Land of Misfit Toys. While Rudolph was taunted for his glowing red nose and disinvited from reindeer games in May's story, he did not live at the North Pole and was asleep in his house when Santa Claus, struggling mightily with the fog, arrived with presents and realized how the reindeer's radiant snout could help him complete his Christmas Eve rounds.

Montgomery Ward had high hopes for its new 32-page, illustrated booklet, which would be given as a free gift to children visiting any of the department store's 620 locations. "We believe that an exclusive story like this aggressively advertised in our newspaper ads and circulars," the advertising department stated in a September 1939 memo, "can bring every store an incalculable amount of publicity...and, far more important a tremendous amount of Christmas traffic."
 
The retailer's holiday advertisements touted "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" as "the rollicking new Christmas verse that's sweeping the country!" That wasn't just hype. Children snapped up nearly 2.4 million copies of the paper-bound book in 1939. Plans to print another 1.6 million copies the following year were shelved by paper shortages due to World War II, and Rudolph remained on hiatus until the conflict's conclusion. When the reindeer story returned in 1946, it was more popular than ever as Montgomery Ward handed out 3.6 million copies of the book.

In the interim, May married a fellow Montgomery Ward employee and became a father again, but he still struggled financially. In 1947, the retailer's board of directors, stirred either by the holiday spirit or belief that the story lacked revenue-making potential, signed the copyright for "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" over to May. In short order, May licensed a commercial version of the book along with a full range of Rudolph-themed merchandise including puzzles, View-Master reels, snow globes, mugs and slippers with sheep wool lining and leather soles.

In 1949, songwriter Johnny Marks, who happened to be May's brother-in-law, set Rudolph's story to music. After Bing Crosby reportedly turned down the chance, singing cowboy Gene Autry recorded the song, which sold 2 million copies in the first year and remains one of the best-selling tunes of all time.

The song and merchandise sales made May financially comfortable, but hardly rich. After leaving Montgomery Ward in 1951 to manage the Rudolph commercial empire, May returned to his former employer seven years later. He continued to work as a copywriter until his 1971 retirement. By the time he died five years later, "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" had become a piece of modern folklore and a metaphor for overcoming obstacles, embracing differences and recognizing everyone's unique potential. 

     
      
 
You can count on us to count for you!  

 

 




Issue 129



 CALL NOW
818-333-5095
OR 818-317-6035

Member CalCPA
In This Issue

 

 

 

 Remember I give a FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION! 

 

 

 

     

  

 

 YOU CAN CHECK OUT MY PAST NEWSLETTERS ON MY WEBSITE ARCHIVE!
 
 


  

 

  

 

You can see some of my FAVORITE ACCOUNTING VIDEOS on the home page of my website:

 

www.briantstonercpa.com 

   

 

 

COUPON

   Save 10% 

Bring this coupon in and get a 10% discount on any new service we provide you 

 (up to $50.00) 

  

    

You Can Count On Us To Count For You!

              

          BRIAN T STONER, CPA

 

 

 

 
Accounting Employment Opportunities  

 
Pauline Casbon of Casbon & Associates, LLC is a professional recruiter I have known for quite a while. She is very professional and can help accountants looking for work get a new position as well as find accounting professionals for business and industry.
   
 
Full Time Job Opportunities: Contact Pauline Casbon at
310 859 3805

Website:

www.casbonassociates.net

See my Linkedin page:

www.linkedin.com/in/PaulineCasbon 
 
  Referral fee for any potential employee that is placed in any of the following positions.      
 
  Immediate Hires!    


Tax Managers, CPAs needed for West Los Angeles.  Salaries from $160k. Work/life balance. Great benefits. Also Tax Managers for Burbank, San Gabriel Valley and Century City.
 
 
 
Tax Accountant for business management accounting firm in West Los Angeles, salary offered up to 100k plus great benefits. 3 years experience required and a CPA license.
   
Account Manager for Business Management firm in Century City,  Westwood, Encino and Woodland Hills, great career opportunity. Datafaction software required. Offering competitive salary and great benefits.

Film and TV Auditor for Century CIty. $110k Commernsurate with experience.

Assurance Managers for great CPA firm, career path available. Locations in Century City and Woodland Hills.  
 
Tax Accountant for Sherman Oaks, Business Management accounting firm. Prefer a CPA certification. ProSystem FX.
 
Tour Assistant and Bookkeeper for Business Management firm in Encino. 

Two Senior Accountants for Encino.
 
Tax Manager for top Business Management firm in Century City, $125k range. 

Audit Manager for top CPA firm in Woodland Hills and Glendale.
 
Tax Manager for Burbank CPA firm. Offering a great career path.

Assistant Bookkeeper for Westwood. Datafaction preferred. Salary up to $60k.  
 
 
Tax Manager with business management accounting industry experience required to handle tax planning.  Up to $150k. Salary commensurate with experience plus excellent benefits. West Los Angeles.

Bookkeeper for West Los Angeles, offering up to $75k. Quickbooks and Mac required.

Graduate with an accounting degree, looking for potential employee to be trained as a bookkeeper. $19.00 per hour plus benefits. Westwood.

Staff Accountant required to join their other young team of accountants for a business management accounting firm handling high net worth individuals in the entertainment industry, great opportunity, career path offering salary up to $80k commensurate with experience, plus OT and bonus. Business Management accounting experience preferred. Encino, Woodland Hills and Brentwood.

Assistant Bookkeeper and Bookkeepers for business management accounting firms in Century City, Westwood, West Los Angeles, Sherman Oaks, Woodland Hills and Encino. Opportunity for great career path in business management, salary range from $55k plus commensurate with experience. Datafaction required.

Audit Senior/Manager, CPA for Century City, Glendale and West Los Angeles. Competitive salary and good benefits. Career path opportunity!!

Tax Accountant, CPA for prestigious firm in Century City, Brentwood and Encino, definite opportunity for career path. Business management accounting industry preferred.

Tax Senior, CPA for prestigious CPA firm in Century City. Salary competitive and commensurate with experience. 85K plus.
 
Tax Seniors for West LA, Century City, San Fernando Valley and the San Gabriel Valley; CPA firm and Business Management Accounting firm, seeking potential employees looking for a career path!
 
Business Manager for Bus. Management accounting firm to become a Partner.  Century City. CPA Certification required.  $130k plus excellent benefits. Datafaction preferred.
 
 Two Audit Seniors for CPA firm located in Santa Monica and Century City. Career path opportunities.
 
 
Tax Accountant for Century City and Encino 1 to 2 years experience of tax preparation with a CPA firm and/or Business Management accounting firm.

Royalty Analyst required for firm located in Encino. 
   
Looking for immediate hires! 
 
I am looking to expand my client base, if you would like further information regarding my staffing services, please do not hesitate to call.  I am happy to visit your office which helps me gain an even better understanding of your firm's culture and staffing requirements.  Please review my website at


and/or review my Linkedin profile.

www.linkedin.com/in/PaulineCasbon

Call 310 859 3805 for further information.  Send resume(s) as a word attachment to :
  



   
 
Santa Claus Has a History All His Own

The man we know as Santa Claus has a history all his own. Today, he is thought of mainly as the jolly man in red, but his story stretches all the way back to the 3rd century.

The Legend of St. Nicholas
The legend of Santa Claus can be traced back hundreds of years to a monk named St. Nicholas. It is believed that Nicholas was born sometime around 280 A.D. in Patara, near Myra in modern-day Turkey. Much admired for his piety and kindness, St. Nicholas became the subject of many legends. It is said that he gave away all of his inherited wealth and traveled the countryside helping the poor and sick. 

One of the best known of the St. Nicholas stories is that he saved three poor sisters from being sold into slavery or prostitution by their father by providing them with a dowry so that they could be married. Over the course of many years, Nicholas's popularity spread and he became known as the protector of children and sailors. His feast day is celebrated on the anniversary of his death, December 6. This was traditionally considered a lucky day to make large purchases or to get married. By the Renaissance, St. Nicholas was the most popular saint in Europe. 

Even after the Protestant Reformation, when the veneration of saints began to be discouraged, St. Nicholas maintained a positive reputation, especially in Holland.
 
Sinter Klaas Comes to New York
St. Nicholas made his first inroads into American popular culture towards the end of the 18th century. In December 1773, and again in 1774, a New Yorknewspaper reported that groups of Dutch families had gathered to honor the anniversary of his death.

The name Santa Claus evolved from Nick's Dutch nickname, Sinter Klaas, a shortened form of Sint Nikolaas (Dutch for Saint Nicholas). In 1804, John Pintard, a member of the New York Historical Society, distributed woodcuts of St. Nicholas at the society's annual meeting. The background of the engraving contains now-familiar Santa images including stockings filled with toys and fruit hung over a fireplace. In 1809, Washington Irving helped to popularize the Sinter Klaas stories when he referred to St. Nicholas as the patron saint of New York in his book, The History of New York. 

As his prominence grew, Sinter Klaas was described as everything from a "rascal" with a blue three-cornered hat, red waistcoat, and yellow stockings to a man wearing a broad-brimmed hat and a "huge pair of Flemish trunk hose."

Shopping Mall Santas
Gift-giving, mainly centered around children, has been an important part of the Christmas celebration since the holiday's rejuvenation in the early 19th century. Stores began to advertise Christmas shopping in 1820, and by the 1840s, newspapers were creating separate sections for holiday advertisements, which often featured images of the newly-popular Santa Claus. In 1841, thousands of children visited a Philadelphia shop to see a life-size Santa Claus model. 

It was only a matter of time before stores began to attract children, and their parents, with the lure of a peek at a "live" Santa Claus. In the early 1890s, the Salvation Army needed money to pay for the free Christmas meals they provided to needy families. They began dressing up unemployed men in Santa Claus suits and sending them into the streets of New York to solicit donations. Those familiar Salvation Army Santas have been ringing bells on the street corners of American cities ever since.

'Twas the Night Before Christmas
In 1822, Clement Clarke Moore, an Episcopal minister, wrote a long Christmas poem for his three daughters entitled "An Account of a Visit from St. Nicholas." Moore's poem, which he was initially hesitant to publish due to the frivolous nature of its subject, is largely responsible for our modern image of Santa Claus as a "right jolly old elf" with a portly figure and the supernatural ability to ascend a chimney with a mere nod of his head! Although some of Moore's imagery was probably borrowed from other sources, his poem helped popularize the now-familiar image of a Santa Claus who flew from house to house on Christmas Eve in "a miniature sleigh" led by eight flying reindeer-leaving presents for deserving children. 

"An Account of a Visit from St. Nicholas" created a new and immediately popular American icon. In 1881, political cartoonist Thomas Nast drew on Moore's poem to create the first likeness that matches our modern image of Santa Claus. His cartoon, which appeared in Harper's Weekly, depicted Santa as a rotund, cheerful man with a full, white beard, holding a sack laden with toys for lucky children. It is Nast who gave Santa his bright red suit trimmed with white fur, North Pole workshop, elves, and his wife, Mrs. Claus.

A Santa by Any Other Name
18th-century America's Santa Claus was not the only St. Nicholas-inspired gift-giver to make an appearance at Christmastime. Similar figures were popular all over the world. 

Christkind or Kris Kringle was believed to deliver presents to well-behaved Swiss and German children. Meaning "Christ child," Christkind is an angel-like figure often accompanied by St. Nicholas on his holiday missions. 

In Scandinavia, a jolly elf named Jultomten was thought to deliver gifts in a sleigh drawn by goats. English legend explains that Father Christmas visits each home on Christmas Eve to fill children's stockings with holiday treats. Pere Noel is responsible for filling the shoes of French children. 

In Russia, it is believed that an elderly woman named Babouschka purposely gave the wise men wrong directions to Bethlehem so that they couldn't find Jesus. Later, she felt remorseful, but could not find the men to undo the damage. To this day, on January 5, Babouschka visits Russian children leaving gifts at their bedsides in the hope that one of them is the baby Jesus and she will be forgiven. 

In Italy, a similar story exists about a woman called La Befana, a kindly witch who rides a broomstick down the chimneys of Italian homes to deliver toys into the stockings of lucky children.


    
    
    
 You Can Count On Us to Count For You!       



Brian T. Stoner, CPA 
2600 W. Olive Ave., 5th Floor
Burbank, CA 91505
(818) 333-5095  CELL (818) 317-6035
FAX (818) 333-5304
bstonercpa@sbcglobal.net