CLOSING THE CIRCLE - SUMMER 2020

 

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National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH)
3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, Canada, V2N 4Z9
T: (250) 960-5250 | F: (250) 960-5644
nccih@unbc.ca
nccih.ca

 

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Welcome

 

We have walked through the longest days of summer and are enjoying the warmth that they bring us. We live in the time of a global pandemic and while our travel plans may be affected by COVID-19, our opportunity to enjoy the beauty of summer has not diminished -- we can enjoy a day at the lake with family, pick huckleberries or go for a walk in the sun. While some provinces and territories have loosened their restrictions on gatherings, it is important to adhere to your province and territory's public health guidelines. On behalf of all of us at the NCCIH, I hope you will continue to be kind, stay calm and be safe.

 

Over the spring months, staff at the NCCIH have been busy working on a number of podcasts related to COVID-19 as well as other topics. These podcasts include:

 

We also hosted two webinars over the past months. Our first webinar highlighted findings from the NCCIH's publication, At the interface: Indigenous health practitioners and evidence-based practice. Co-authors Dr. Kim van der Woerd and Sofia Vitalis summarized key research and policy findings of this publication. They were followed by Dr. Bernice Downey who discussed issues related to health practice that accompany working between, and within, the two worlds of Indigenous and Western systems. On June 26, 2020, we hosted the webinar, Traditional Indigenous Medicine in North America: A Review, with Dr. Nicole Redvers. This webinar provided participants with information to understand traditional Indigenous medicines in North America, including evidence-based and evidenced-informed science in the context of Indigenous medicine and healing practices, key themes in the Indigenous traditional medicine literature, and current issues surrounding research on or with traditional medicine.

 

Last month, a revised Indigenous Child and Youth Health Curriculum was launched in collaboration with the Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS). First released in 2011, this revised curriculum is intended to provide a foundational understanding for paedriatric residents on specific issues related to the health and well-being of First Nations, Inuit and Métis children and youth in Canada, including demographics and data, medical conditions, colonization, social determinants of health, and cultural safety.

 

As always, please continue to enjoy and share our knowledge resources with your community and networks, and if you have not already done so, join us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest, Vimeo, YouTube, SoundCloud, or ISSUU to participate in updates as they happen! Be sure to visit our web site or subscribe to our mailing list to receive notifications of newly released NCCIH resources, upcoming webinars and our regular seasonal newsletters. If you are interested in knowing about any of our publications, please see our Resources Booklet.

 

On behalf of the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH), we hope you stay safe, healthy and we look forward to sharing our work with you.

 

Meegwetch

 

Margo Greenwood, Academic Leader
National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH)

 

 

 

NCCIH News

Updates on COVID-19

The National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH) will be frequently updating our home page and social media channels to provide reliable, accurate and up-to-date information as well as information sources in relation to COVID-19 in response to the rapidly-evolving global pandemic. These updates will relate to official public health guidelines and any information specific to First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples and communities.

 

Read the web story

 
 


Indigenous Health Researchers Database

The Indigenous Health Researchers Database is a searchable feature on the NCCIH website. There are currently 386 researchers with 2,382 publications listed. However, we would like to see that number grow to 500 researchers listed by the end of 2020. To request edits to an author's entry, or to request to be added to the database, please complete the online form.

 
 

 

Events Calendar

Upcoming Events

 

Please visit the online NCCIH calendar of events, which highlights conferences, workshops, and other events of interest in the field of Indigenous Health including regional, national and global listings.

 
 

Send us an email to nccih@unbc.ca with "Calendar Submission" in the subject line if you have an event you would like added to our calendar.

 
 

Public Health 2020

 

Virtual event, October 14-16, 2020.

 

Conference web site link

 
 

The NCCIH will continue to update the events calendar with rescheduled dates and list any upcoming virtual events in the fall newsletter.

 

New NCCIH Resources

 

Voices from the Field 11 - Supporting Indigenous Midwifery during COVID-19

 

On April 3, 2020, the National Aboriginal Council of Midwives (NACM) and the Canadian Association of Midwives (CAM) issued the following statement: Midwives as Essential Primary Care Providers in the Context of COVID-19. This episode of Voices from the Field is based on a conversation with Carol Couchie and Claire Dion Fletcher, co-chairs of NACM, in which they speak to this statement and how Indigenous midwifery has been impacted by COVID-19.

 

Listen on SoundCloud

 

 

Voices from the Field 11 - Supporting Indigenous Midwifery during COVID-19

 

 


 

Voices from the Field 12 - Adapting to COVID-19: Reflections on staying connected to traditions and ceremonies during a pandemic

 

In this episode, Dr. James Makokis, proud Cree and member of the Saddle Lake First Nation, shares ideas about how Indigenous people can stay connected to their Elders and traditions while respecting public health guidelines on social distancing. He also offers thoughts about how ceremonial practices may need to adapt, moving forward, to ensure the continued health and safety of Indigenous people and communities during this pandemic.

 

Listen on SoundCloud

 

 

Voices from the Field 12 - Adapting to COVID-19: Reflections on staying connected to traditions and ceremonies during a pandemic

 

 


 

Voices from the Field 13 - Inuit risk and response to COVID-19

 

In this episode, Aluki Kotierk, the President of Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated (NTI), speaks to the ongoing inequities that put Inuit at greater risk during the COVID-19 pandemic. She also speaks to the challenges that some Inuit communities and households face when trying to follow public health guidelines around physical distancing and hand hygiene. We also learn how Inuit organizations and communities, in addition to Nunavut's Chief Public Health Officer, have responded to the pandemic and ensured that Nunavut has remained COVID-19 free.

 

Listen on SoundCloud

 

 

Voices from the Field 13 - Inuit risk and response to COVID-19

 

 


 

Voices from the Field 14 - Doris Young on respecting our kiteyak during COVID-19

 

This episode is focused on Doris Young's April 30, 2020 op-ed in the Winnipeg Free Press, We must remember our responsibility to our elders. A member of the Opaskwayak Cree Nation (OCN), located in northern Manitoba, Ms. Young is a strong advocate and voice for her fellow community Elders, as well as those from non-Indigenous communities. Observing the poor treatment of many non-Indigenous seniors living in nursing homes across Canada, she wrote, "In this troubled time, the elderly are suffering far too much. They have paid far too high a price for getting old. Too many of the nursing homes they have been placed in have not been caring responsibly for these precious community members." In the following episode, Ms. Young shares Cree concepts on Elders and reminds us of their significant role for cultural continuity and community well-being. She does this so that we remember our responsibilities to them during a pandemic like COVID-19.

 

Listen on SoundCloud

 

 

Voices from the Field 14 - Doris Young on respecting our kiteyak during COVID-19

 

 


 

Voices from the Field 15 - Homelessness and mental health among Indigenous People

 

This episode provides an overview of a multi-year, community-based research study examining homelessness among Indigenous Peoples, conducted in Winnipeg, MB, funded by the Mental Health Commission of Canada. The study was co-led by Dr. Jino Distasio (University of Winnipeg) and community partners Betty Edel and Lucille Bruce (End Homelessness Winnipeg). In this podcast, Betty, Lucille and Jino discuss the At Home/Chez Soi study and how they engaged and worked alongside the urban Indigenous population experiencing homelessness in Winnipeg. You will hear how the project began and context for this work, how an Indigenous perspective informed understandings of the root causes of homelessness among Indigenous Peoples, and how those understandings shaped and continue to shape work ongoing beyond the project. Insights in relation to preventing homelessness among Indigenous Peoples are highlighted.

 

Listen on SoundCloud

 

 

Voices from the Field 15 - Homelessness and mental health among Indigenous People

 

 


 

Voices from the Field 16 - Supporting grief, mourning and mental health during COVID-19

 

In this episode, Dr. Jeffrey Ansloos discusses everyday foundations of Indigenous peoples' mental health, well-being and healing, both broadly as well as specific to the current pandemic. With public health restrictions in place on travel and large social gatherings, collective grieving and mourning to celebrate the life of loved ones has been severely limited. Here, Dr. Ansloos discusses its long-term effects and the need for proactive adaptations to support the emotional and mental health needs of families and communities. He ends by reinforcing the strengths of communities and how they support greater mental health and well-being.

 

Listen on SoundCloud

 

 

Voices from the Field 16 - Supporting grief, mourning and mental health during COVID-19

 

 


 

At the interface - Indigenous health practitioners and evidence based practice

 

The webinar resources for "At the interface - Indigenous health practitioners and evidence based practice" (held March 18, 2020) with presenters Dr. Bernice Downey, Dr. Kim van der Woerd and Sofia Vitalis are now available online.

 

Watch on YouTube | Listen on SoundCloud

 

 

At the interface - Indigenous health practitioners and evidence based practice

 

 

Traditional Indigenous Medicine in North America - A Review

 

The webinar resources for "Traditional Indigenous Medicine in North America - A Review" (held June 26, 2020) with presenter Dr. Nicole Redvers are now available online.

 

Watch on YouTube | Listen on SoundCloud

 

 

Traditional Indigenous Medicine in North America - A Review

 

Request NCCIH Knowledge Resources

 

Did you know you can request NCCIH publications free of charge? Send your request to us by filling out the "Request this Publication" form found at the bottom of each online publication page, indicate how many copies you'd like, a note about how you will utilize the resource, your name and mailing address. We will do our best to accommodate your request based on our current available printed inventory. If you have multiple publication requests, please use the "Request Publications" text link found in the top right hand corner of the NCCIH web site.

 

Do you have a particular NCCIH publication that you or your organization found to be an excellent resource? If so, we would appreciate you letting us know what it was and how you found it useful, by filling out the "Publication Feedback" form. We welcome your feedback.

 

All NCCIH materials can be reproduced in whole or in part with appropriate attribution and citation. These materials are to be used solely for non-commercial purposes. To measure the impact of these materials, we would appreciate your informing us of their use by filling out the "Publication Use Notification" form, including information about whether you distributed the resource to others, quoted it or cited it.

 

Online Resources

 

In support of creating a health community focused on knowledge synthesis, transfer and exchange we have chosen a sampling of current online resources to share. Please note the links provided in the NCCIH newsletters are for general interest only and do not indicate an endorsement. The views expressed in the linked resources do not necessarily represent the views of the NCCIH or our funder the Public Health Agency of Canada.

 

Send us an email to nccih@unbc.ca with "Online Resource" in the subject line if you have an online resource you would like added to our next newsletter.

 

 

Statistics Canada - The Daily - 7 publications released in 2020

 
 

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) - COVID-19: Testing and reducing stigma

 
 

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) - Help reduce the spread of COVID-19: Information for Indigenous communities

 

 

Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami - The potential impacts of COVID-19 on Inuit Nunangat

 
 

First Nations Health Managers Association - A Pandemic Planning Tool for First Nations Communities

 
 

First Nations Health Authority - A Guide to COVID-19

 

 

First Nations Child & Family Caring Society E-news Summer 2020

 
 

Indigenous Mentorship Network of the Pacific Northwest (IMN-PN) Newsletter June 2020

 
 

First Nations Health Authority (FNHA) Newsletter July 2020

 

 

Thunderbird Partnership Foundation - Stigma during COVID-19

 
 

Thunderbird Partnership Foundation - Homelessness during COVID-19

 
 

Cultural Survival - The Future of Indigenous Health

 

Online Multimedia

 

This section features infographics, interactives, apps or videos that we found interesting or educational. Please note the links provided in the NCCIH newsletters are for general interest only and do not indicate an endorsement. The views expressed in the linked resources do not necessarily represent the views of the NCCIH or our funder the Public Health Agency of Canada.

 

Send us an email if you have multimedia resources you would like included in our next newsletter to nccih@unbc.ca with "Multimedia Submission" in the subject line.

 

 

1) Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Video - COVID-19: How to wear a non-medical mask or face covering properly.

 

2) CBC Radio Podcast - Unreserved - How Indigenous leaders are changing the future of food.

 

3) Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami created various Inuit-Specific Online Learning Resources, including apps, websites, games, and more.

 

 

 

The NCCs of NCCPH

Established in 2005 and funded through the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), the six National Collaborating Centres (NCCs) for Public Health (NCCPH) work together to promote the use of scientific research and other knowledge to strengthen public health practices, programs and policies in Canada.

 

A unique knowledge hub, the NCCs identify knowledge gaps, foster networks and provide the public health system with an array of evidence-based resources, multi-media products, and knowledge translation services.

 

 

Read the latest NCCPH newsletter

 

Podcast: Public Health Considerations for COVID-19 in Evacuations of Northern Indigenous Communities

 

This public health podcast, Infectious Questions, was produced by the National Collaborating Centre for Infectious Diseases (NCCID) in partnership with the the National Collaborating Centre for Indigenous Health (NCCIH). With a focus on First Nations and preparedness for COVID-19, speakers Marlene Larocque and Dr. Myrle Ballard discuss the history of communicable disease emergencies in First Nations communities, the ongoing challenges to pandemic preparedness and how First Nations can be better supported to respond to this public health crisis.

 

Listen to the podcast on the NCCID web site

 

 

Podcast: Public Health Considerations for COVID-19 in Evacuations of Northern Indigenous Communities

 

 


Connect with the NCCs

The NCCs are located across Canada, and each focuses on a different public health priority.

 

The six centres are:

 

NCC for Indigenous Health (NCCIH), University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC

 
 

NCC for Determinants of Health (NCCDH), St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia

 
 

NCC for Healthy Public Policy (NCCHPP), Institut national de sante publique du Quebec (INSPQ), Montreal, Quebec

 

 

NCC for Infectious Diseases (NCCID), University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba

 
 

NCC for Environmental Health (NCCEH), British Columbia Centre for Disease Control, Vancouver, BC

 
 

NCC for Methods and Tools (NCCMT), McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario