"Let's Talk Sustainability"
or
SUSTAINABLE MATERIALS MANAGEMENT
Do you know all Connecticut residents are, by law, required to recycle?

The Town of Kent is a member of the Housatonic Resources Recovery Authority (HRRA), a regional, governmental waste management and recycling authority serving fourteen municipalities in western Connecticut and a population of over 258,098 people. 

Last year, Kent was one of the first towns to join the Connecticut Coalition on Sustainable Materials Management (CCSMM). Since joining, we have participated in regular meetings to drive change through legislation by supporting a modernized bottle bill - PA 21-58 - and continue to collaborate with the coalition and DEEP Commissioner Katie Dykes to innovate.

Read more about what Connecticut is doing as a leader in Sustainable Materials Management:
Some interesting facts:
  • Organic food scraps are the heaviest waste in household waste, accounting for over 30% of the total weight. The Town pays over $9o.oo per ton for disposal of household garbage.
  • Glass is the heaviest material and takes up the most volume in single stream recycling.
  • The great news is that we are already separating glass from our single-stream recycling - over 15 tons so far.

The better stewards we can be of how we separate our materials, the better stewards we are in managing our materials more sustainably.

The are so many ways to get in the swing of recycling! All items should be empty, rinsed, clean, and open. Save this list about what can and cannot be recycles, or download the RecycleCT app for your iPhone or android device. 
Things to Know About
The Town of Kent Transfer Station
Annual permit for Kent residents: 
$150 / $130 for 65 years and older
Permits are issued at the Transfer Station or Town Hall,
Cash or checks are accepted

Address:
38 Maple Street (Route 341) - entrance is at 46 Maple Street
Kent, Connecticut

Hours of operation:
Saturday & Sunday, 8:oo A.M.- 3:3o P.M.

Be sure to check the Town of Kent website for up-to-date information. 
How Are Items Separated Out?
CLOTHING/ TEXTILES
All residents of Kent may use the textile bin to drop off their bagged clothing and other textiles. The Town gets a rebate for discarded textiles, so be sure to separate them out from other trash. No permit required.

E-WASTE
All residents of Kent may also dropoff unwanted, broken electronics, TVs, computers, etc. No permit required. 
MATTRESSES
Mattresses are part of a program called Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR), through which all of the environmental costs associated with a product’s life cycle are factored into the price of that product. Connecticut is a national leader in EPR programs
Mattresses and box springs are accepted - if wet, dirty or bug-infested must be disposed of in the bulky waste (fees apply). No permit required.

METAL 
Metal items go into a special bin. A hauler takes it to a scrap yard, which pays per pound for the items. The metal removal program actually pays for itself!
Here’s a small sample of items that can go in the metal bin: BBQs, bicycles, snowblowers, bed frames, water heaters, washers, dryers, any appliance w/o refrigerant, toasters, metal garbage cans. 

EGG CARTONS
The Transfer Station collects egg cartons for local farmers. Please make sure they are clean and dry. 

PAINT
Paint cans that have liquid paint still in them may be left in the Paint Tent. This includes paint, stain or sealer. Please check the sign at the tent for what is allowed and what is Household Hazardous Waste. Empty metal paint cans may be tossed into the metal bin; empty plastic paint cans may be tossed into the MSW dumpster.

BATTERIES
We recycle lithium and NiCAD batteries and may be dropped off at the table at the E-Waste container. Any other alkaline batteries can be thrown away with your garbage. Check with an attendant before dropping off a car battery.
GLASS
Separating out your glass really pays off for the environment and saves money! The HRRA partners with Urban Mining CT to turn recycled glass into a white, powdery material that can be used when making concrete. The material, known as Pozzotive, prevents discarded glass from clogging landfills and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Pozzotive can replace up to 50% of the cement when making concrete. It creates a stronger, more water resistant concrete, thus extending the life of the finished product.  Items that cannot go into the glass bin: light bulbs (see below), dishes, ceramics, window glass, drinking glasses and candles. These items may bagged with your household garbage..
LIGHT BULBS
LED, Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFLs), and holiday string lights may be dropped of at the e-Waste table. Incandescent bulbs may be bagged with your your household garbage.

BULKY WASTE
Large items that cannot go in any of the above bins or areas are considered Bulky Waste. This is fee-based drop-off and always see an attendant before dropping anything off for Bulky Waste. You can find fees for many items on the Kent page of the HRRA website.

MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE
This is the bin for your household garbage and other small items.
What about "Methyl-Ethyl-Bad-Stuff?"
Household Hazardous Waste cannot be dropped off anywhere at the Transfer Station. It is in violation of our General Permit to accept any these materials.

Household Hazardous Waste Days

A number of HRRA member towns host household hazardous waste day events during the year. All residents of the HRRA member towns are welcome to bring their household hazardous waste to these events. Check the HHW flyer for each event for a list of acceptable hazardous materials.

The next Hazardous Waste Day is this Saturday, October 9th, from 9:ooam-3:oopm at the John Pettibone School in New Milford.
Click here for the flyer for this event.

Do you have a container of "methyl-ehtyl-bad-stuff" and are not sure what to do with it? Visit the Household Hazardous Waste page on the HRRA website for a comprehensive list of HHW materials and how to properly dispose of them. Read more about Clean Harbors, which organizes and runs the program. 
As a reminder, when at the Transfer Station, please don’t leave your vehicle running. Turning off your engine helps save fuel and the environment. It’s a Connecticut state law. 
Thank you for doing your part!
Jean C. Speck
First Selectman
Town of Kent