Thursday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time

Brothers and sisters:
Knowledge inflates with pride, but love builds up.
If anyone supposes he knows something,
he does not yet know as he ought to know.
But if one loves God, one is known by him.
So about the eating of meat sacrificed to idols:
we know that there is no idol in the world,
and that there is no God but one.
Indeed, even though there are so-called gods in heaven and on earth
(there are, to be sure, many “gods” and many “lords”),
yet for us there is
one God, the Father,
from whom all things are and for whom we exist,
and one Lord, Jesus Christ,
through whom all things are and through whom we exist.
But not all have this knowledge.
There are some who have been so used to idolatry up until now
that, when they eat meat sacrificed to idols,
their conscience, which is weak, is defiled.
Thus, through your knowledge, the weak person is brought to destruction,
the brother for whom Christ died.
When you sin in this way against your brothers
and wound their consciences, weak as they are,
you are sinning against Christ.
Therefore, if food causes my brother to sin,
I will never eat meat again,
so that I may not cause my brother to sin.

Gospel LK 6:27-38
Jesus said to his disciples:
“To you who hear I say, love your enemies,
do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you,
pray for those who mistreat you.
To the person who strikes you on one cheek,
offer the other one as well,
and from the person who takes your cloak,
do not withhold even your tunic.
Give to everyone who asks of you,
and from the one who takes what is yours do not demand it back.
Do to others as you would have them do to you.
For if you love those who love you,
what credit is that to you?
Even sinners love those who love them.
And if you do good to those who do good to you,
what credit is that to you?
Even sinners do the same.
If you lend money to those from whom you expect repayment,
what credit is that to you?
Even sinners lend to sinners,
and get back the same amount.
But rather, love your enemies and do good to them,
and lend expecting nothing back;
then your reward will be great
and you will be children of the Most High,
for he himself is kind to the ungrateful and the wicked.
Be merciful, just as also your Father is merciful.
“Stop judging and you will not be judged.
Stop condemning and you will not be condemned.
Forgive and you will be forgiven.
Give and gifts will be given to you;
a good measure, packed together, shaken down, and overflowing,
will be poured into your lap.
For the measure with which you measure
will in return be measured out to you.”

Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved. 
Take the Gospel to prayer:

“Stop judging and you will not be judged.
Stop condemning and you will not be condemned.
Forgive and you will be forgiven.
Give and gifts will be given to you;
a good measure, packed together, shaken down, and overflowing,
will be poured into your lap.
For the measure with which you measure
will in return be measured out to you.”

The message is clear...this do unto others text is something that we have heard our entire lives. I would just add a point of clarity perhaps to the last line if you are not familiar with it.

If you are a baker, you know the importance of a measurement. The "amount" of something in a recipe impacts the results. If a cup of sugar is asked for and you scoop up sugar loosely to the top of measuring cup, you get one amount of sugar. If you take the same scoop, tap the sides so the sugar settles and fill in the crannies with more sugar before you evenly level the top, you get another amount. If you fill the cup with sugar and pack it down, filling and repeating and then top it off with all the loose sugar it will hold, you will get a third amount. Yet someone might call any of those results a "cup of sugar".

In Jesus' day, there were not County-certified scales in the marketplace. Loose goods were often carried in one's apron or the basket that you brought with you. So this reference is to say that we should do things to the fullest - as if our apron or basket had been loaded and then packed down to take even more until it overflowed.

This is God's love for us...He asks us to love in the same way. Our love outpoured and overflowing will return to us in the same way.

Help me, Lord, to not be stingy with my time, talent and treasure so that I might always be offering a full measure in all I do.

Bishop Barron reflects on Judgement
St. Thomas Villanova understood the message of today's scriptures:

 “If there are people who refuse to work, that is for the governor and the police to deal with. My duty is to assist and relieve those who come to my door.”