EMPLOYEE BURNOUT OFFICIALLY RECOGNIZED
Just recently, the World Health Organization (WHO) classified employee burnout as a legitimate medical condition. We've known the issues surrounding this for years but many organizations cannot spot the signs or understand the science behind it. In this newsletter, we are examining the medical science behind the recent classification, how to fix the problem, the generation it affects most and American workers' views on the situation.
IT'S OFFICIAL
The work-related stress, which has been unofficially embedded in the cultural zeitgeist for years, has been officially recognized by the World Health Organization (WHO) through a revision of the International Classification of Diseases — a handbook for doctors and health insurers. The official ailment can be found in  ICD-11  under "Problems associated with employment or unemployment."

According to the health agency, burnout isn't just synonymous with being stressed out. It's "a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.” 

"AN OCCUPATIONAL PHENOMENON"
"A theory for why WHO has issued recent guidance on burnout is that many current employees can't appreciate the results of their work. The farmer of a century ago may have worked longer hours, toiled harder physically and had little time off, but he could see the fruits of his labor in a healthy harvest. A computer programmer, however, may work long hours behind a computer screen but see no connection between her work and her company's mission."

A MILLENNIAL ISSUE?
"Agencies are seeing an uptick in younger employees reporting burnout.Some see it as a symptom of a buyer’s market, with agencies encountering a faster-paced work environment, longer hours, tighter budgets and harsher deadlines to keep clients happy. Others believe younger employees, specifically millennials, might not know how to unplug from work or set work-life boundaries. How burnout manifests and how employees report it varies by agency, and by employee."

BURNOUT IS PREVENTABLE
"Work burn out is preventable, but it requires a cultural shift. Business leaders who look out for the signs and take care of their staff will reap the rewards of a happy and engaged workforce. Building a resilient workforce is the key to success. Forcing employees to burn out is a false economy. It’s bad for people, business and society as a whole."

NEARLY HALF OF THE US WOULD PREFER A FOUR DAY WORK WEEK
"A small but growing number of U.S. businesses are adopting a four-day workweek to boost productivity and morale, and provide a competitive edge in the scramble for employees. While some scrunch the standard 40 hours into four days, others simply shed a day and require four eight-hour days, typically with no cut in pay.

“In this intensely competitive labor market, employers are figuring out that to attract talent, they have to start offering incentives that differentiate them from competitors,” says Ian Siegel, CEO of ZipRecruiter, a jobs marketplace."

Would you prefer a four day work week?
Yes
No