Volume V, Issue 51

Dec. 17, 2018
Federal Judge in Texas Overturns ACA
WH
Late in the day Friday, Dec. 14, 2018 multiple media outlets reported the shocking news. Peter Sullivan reports for The Hill:

A federal judge in Texas on Friday struck down the Affordable Care Act, throwing a new round of uncertainty into the fate of the law just one day before the deadline to sign up for coverage for next year. U.S. District Court Judge Reed O'Connor ruled that the law's individual mandate is unconstitutional, and that because the mandate cannot be separated from the rest of the law, the rest of the law is also invalid...The reasoning of the ruling states that in 2012, the Supreme Court upheld the mandate to have coverage because of Congress's power to tax. But, last year, Congress removed the fine for failing to comply with the mandate, which, he <O'Connor> argues, means the mandate is no longer a tax and therefore is unconstitutional.
 
WIM
According to Mr. Sullivan, the ruling is certain to be appealed, and legal experts in both parties have said they ultimately expect the challenge to the health law will not succeed. ObamaCare will remain in effect while the case is appealed.  
Read More in The Hill.
See also:
Relationship Between Low Income and Obesity Is Relatively New
WH
Andrea Schneibel reports via Medical Xpress on 12/11/18:

It is well known that poorer Americans are more likely to be obese or suffer from diabetes; there is a strong negative correlation between household income and both obesity and diabetes. This negative correlation, however, has only developed in the past 30 years, according to researchers in Tennessee and London. Since 1990, the rise of obesity and diabetes was fastest among the poorest U.S. regions, says Alexander Bentley of the University of Tennessee. The timing also fits with the generations exposed to high fructose corn syrup in foodstuffs and drinks, says Bentley, who is the lead author of a study in the journal Palgrave Communications. Experts describe the unprecedented rise in obesity in recent history as the most rapid change ever seen in human physiology. Only a century ago, obesity was a phenomenon almost unknown to citizens of the U.S. and other developed countries.
 
WIM
According to the author:

Bentley and his colleagues speculate that the oversupply and ready access to foodstuffs containing high fructose corn syrup may be driving obesity levels. In the past, people's diets contained very little sugar and no refined carbohydrates. Overall sugar consumption in the American diet has risen gradually in the 20th century, from 12 per cent of US food energy in 1909 to 19 per cent by the year 2000.
Six Trends Pointing to Revolution in Healthcare   
WH
Fred Bazzoli, in a Health Data Management post dated Dec. 11, 2018, describes six trends transforming the health industry.

WIM
According to the author:
 
Healthcare is in the midst of a dramatic shift, as new players surge into the business of health. Technology giants are signaling growing interest in entering the industry and disrupting traditional ways in which healthcare has been provided.

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Florida Health Industry Week in Review is published every Monday by
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Each Monday morning, we share the top healthcare headlines of the previous week and summarize
What Happened (WH) and
Why It Matters (WIM).

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