FHIcommunications logo
Inform | Connect | Engage
March 21, 2019
              FHIweekly               
Volume X  |  Issue 12      
What the New Egg Study Means for the Beloved Breakfast Food
Rachael Rettner | Live Science
 
Eggs are back in the news, with a new study concluding that regular consumption of the beloved breakfast food may increase the risk of heart disease after all. The large, long-running study - published today ( March 15) in the journal JAMA - found that eating three to four eggs per week was linked to a 6 percent increase in a person's risk of developing heart disease and an 8 percent increase in their risk of dying from any cause during the study period, compared with not eating eggs. The culprit, the researchers wrote, appears to be cholesterol; the study also found that eating...
Sponsor
_________
Sponsor
_________
The latest tips to secure your organization against ransomware
Larry Whiteside | Fierce Healthcare

Cybercrime is on the rise against the sector because healthcare providers are often seen as easy targets with valuable information and insufficient security to protect it. While several endpoint security tools can reduce data risk through detection and response methods, the most effective measures should be taken on the front line where staff members handle devices and sensitive information. Implementing a few simple best practices can significantly reduce risk.
FHIcommunications
Death By 1,000 Clicks: Where Electronic Health Records Went Wrong
Fred Schulte and Erika Fry | Fortune via KHN

Electronic health records were supposed to do a lot: make medicine safer, bring higher-quality care, empower patients, and yes, even save money. Boosters heralded an age when researchers could harness the big data within to reveal the most effective treatments for disease and sharply reduce medical errors. Patients, in turn, would have truly portable health records, being able to share their medical histories in a flash with doctors and hospitals anywhere in the country - essential when life-and-death decisions are being made in the ER.

But 10 years after President Barack Obama signed a law to accelerate the digitization of medical records - with the federal government, so far, sinking $36 billion into the effort - America has little to show for its investment. KHN and Fortune spoke with more than 100 physicians, patients, IT experts and administrators, health policy leaders, attorneys, top government officials and representatives at more than a half-dozen EHR vendors, including the CEOs of two of the companies. The interviews reveal a tragic missed opportunity: Rather than an electronic ecosystem of information, the nation's thousands of EHRs largely remain a sprawling, disconnected patchwork. Moreover, the effort has handcuffed health providers to technology they mostly can't stand and has enriched and empowered the $13-billion-a-year industry that sells it.
Sponsor
_______ ______

A new prescription for saving Floridians money on drug costs
John Couris

Drug prices in the United States are out of control, and I'm thrilled to see that Gov. Ron DeSantis and Florida legislators are doing something about it this session. Their plan to import safe, more affordable drugs from FDA-approved facilities in other countries will save Floridians up to 80 percent on what they currently pay for prescription drugs. That's a plan I'm proud to stand behind.

Health care costs in America are astronomical, and the exorbitant costs of prescription drugs contribute significantly to the price we pay for health care. Americans spend $3.5 trillion per year on health care, and $334 billion (or roughly 10 percent) of that spending is on prescription drugs. Meanwhile, drugs produced in other countries can be just as safe and far more affordable.

As president and CEO of Tampa General Hospital, I see the impact of out-of-control costs for prescription drugs on our patients. More than 669,000 patients seek care here at Tampa General Hospital every year, and often the cost of prescription drugs stands in the way of their health and well-being. Some patients choose not to take them because they can't afford them, and their condition may worsen. Often, we see patients who have conditions that could have been prevented if they could have purchased and taken their prescription drugs.

Inform  Connect  Engage 

Inside  

FloridaHealthIndustry.com