FRWA eNews
March  31, 2020
Contact Us
Florida Rural Water Association
2970 Wellington Circle
Tallahassee FL 32309
850.668.2746
Upcoming Training
04.14.2020
Wastewater Process and Control and Troubleshooting/Boca Grande
04.22.2020
B/D/C Drinking Water Certification Review/Navarre
05.05.2020
1/2/3 Water Distribution Certifcation/Bartow

05.20-21.2020
06.02.2020
A/B/D/C Drinking Water Certification Review/Fort Myers
07.07.2020
B/D/C Drinking Water Certification Review/Marianna
08.03-.05.2020
08.18.2020
1/2/3 Water Distribution Certification/Lake City
09.09.2020
B/C Wastewater Certification Review/Punta Gorda
11.03.2020
B/C Wastewater Certification Review/Tavares
Online Training
FRADULENT EMAIL FROM FRWA
An email was sent to FRWA members as a "gofundme" to help with "Alex Recovery Journey". This is not from the Florida Rural Water Association.  FRWA would never solicit funds from it's members in this manner. Please do not donate to this cause and please let us know if you recieve anything of this manner in the future by contacting us at  frwa@frwa.net .  For more information and to see a copy of the email, click here.

We are doing everything in our power to prevent this type of fraudulent activity.  W e apologize for the inconvenience.
2020 Hurricane Season
Expected to be Above Average
The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be another busy year after the already raucous 2019, according to a report by AccuWeather. The start of the season is only two months away but AccuWeather meteorologists released their predictions of an above-average year suggesting 14 to 18 tropical storms. An average hurricane season has about 12 named storms, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 
From June 1 to Nov. 30, meteorologists expect to see seven to nine hurricanes, with about two to four of them becoming major hurricanes - a storm with maximum sustained wind speeds greater than 130 mph.

Meteorologists draw evidence in atmospheric patterns, which appear reminiscent of 2005 patterns - another hyperactive year.

The predictions go hand-and-hand with a forecast made by the Climate Prediction Center last week when it released its findings on El Niño, the large series of climate changes seen in the Pacific Ocean, and it having weak westerly winds blowing to the east. The lack of wind production means low wind shear and the greater chance for pressure to build in the Atlantic while warm water stew.

Such conditions produced an above average year previously.

The 2019 hurricane season was the fourth consecutive year in a row with above-average activity in the Atlantic and featured historically powerful storms such as major hurricanes Dorian, Lorenzo and Humberto.

The 2019 season was also the fifth year in a row where a tropical storm formed before June 1, with subtropical storm Andrea developing on May 21.
FL/AL Conference
May 20-21, 2020
Edgewater Beach and Golf Resort
11212 Front Beach Road
Panama City Beach, Florida 32407
855.512.3843 (Group Code 11502D)
The 2020 Flo rida Alabama Joint Training and Technical Conference is less than a month away on May 20-21, 2020. This year's event will be held at the beautiful Edgewater Beach and Golf Resort in Panama City Beach.    To register, click here .

If you would like to be an exhibitor, the information is available on our website by clicking here.

The hotel reservation cutoff date is April 15,2020. Be sure to mention th e Florida Rural Water Association or the code 11502D to take advantage of the reduced rate. Reserve your room today online by clicking the link below https://www.resortcollection.com/edgewater-beach-resort or by calling 855.512.3843. There will also be a one time charge to those staying at the Edgewater of $10.00 for parking. This one time charge covers your entire stay.

Complete information is available on the FRWA website by clicking here .
Scholarship Opportunity
Today is the last day to apply for the Curtis E.  Lloyd Scholarship. You must have your application in by March 31st.  The s cholarships are awarded to assist students with tuition, educational fees and/or other expenses. Individual scholarships are will be awarded for up to $1,000.00. Upon completion please submit the application along with a  synopsis of the applicant's educational and professional goals with as much specificity as possible. This information may be mailed to FRWA, 2970 Wellington Circle, Tallahassee FL 32309 or emailed to Amanda.Read@frwa.net.

National News
CISA releases Version 2.0 of the Essential Critical Infrastructure Worker Guidance originally published on March 19, 2020  As the Nation comes together to slow the spread of COVID-19, on March 16th the President issued updated Coronavirus Guidance for America that highlighted the importance of the critical infrastructure workforce. more

AWWA survey shows water utilities confident in maintaining  AWWA surveyed utilities and other sector organizations to gauge the initial impacts of COVID-19 and actions being taken to manage risk and plan for contingencies.  more

EPA Announces Enforcement Discretion Policy for COVID-19 Pandemic  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is mindful of the health and safety of the public, as well as our staff, and those of Federal Agencies, State and Local Governments, Tribes, Regulated Entities, Contractors, and Non-governmental Organizations during the COVID-19 pandemic.  more

Volunteer Network Rescues Small Alabama Water System with Operator under Quarantine  The call for help came to the Alabama Rural Water Association on March 19.  more

NRWA COVID-19 Webpage CDC is responding to an outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus that was first detected in China and which has now been detected in almost 90 locations internationally, including in the United States.  more
State News







Are you out? City of Palm Coast to offer free toilet paper to keep sewers
from clogging on paper towels | Palm Coast Observer If you are out or are in danger of running out, the city will deliver, while supplies last.  more

Utility disconnections suspended across south Florida  As more businesses temporarily close in Florida, many people are losing their jobs and struggling to pay their bills. more

Florida drought numbers creeping higher during dry spell  There are basically two seasons in South Florida: the hot, humid summers when rains drop almost daily and then, well, now, when the landscape is turning crispy. more

SRWMD ANNOUNCES IMPORTANT CHANGE TO RIVER COST-SHARE FUNDING APPLICATION DATE TO JUNE 16, 2020   Due to concerns with possible impacts from COVID-19 the District has extended the application period for the RIVER projects. more

Coronavirus Florida: 'Flushable' wipes are not safe to flush | Herald Tribune  While disinfecting wipes are useful for sanitation and combating the spread of germs, they can cause a lot of damage if not disposed of properly.  more
This Week in Water History
Typhoid in Rockville MD

March 26, 1914: Municipal Journalletter to the editor. Typhoid Epidemic at Rockville, MD. "Prof. Earle B. Phelps for the United States Government at Washington, Robert B. Morse, chief engineer Maryland State Board of Health, a number of others and the writer were recently called upon by the authorities at Rockville to inquire into and alleviate a typhoid epidemic in which two per cent. of the entire population were stricken with the disease. There have been more than 20 cases, but to date there have been no deaths.

Rockville, a small town of 1,100 inhabitants, lies about 18 miles distant from Washington, D. C. It is built on the backbone of a ridge draining into three watersheds. Since 1897 the town has operated its own waterworks, obtaining a supply from two driven wells about 40 feet apart and some 225 feet deep, located in the valley in the direct line of the storm water run off from the town which takes approximately one-half the runoff.

The district surrounding the pumping station is sparsely built up, the town is unsewered and has few storm water drains. Kitchen and bath wastes are permitted to pass into the street and down the gutter. Cesspools and open closets dot the hillside. A small stream passing near the pumping station serves as an outlet for floods, kitchen wastes, etc. The normal flow of the creek does not exceed 4 cubic feet per minute. more

For more articles on what went on this week in water history, click here
Florida Rural Water Association |   frwa@frwa.net | http://www.frwa.net
2970 Wellington Circle
Tallahassee FL 32309
850.668.2746