NEWSLETTER
CAMWS Logo
FALL 2019
IN THIS ISSUE
Contents
  • Message from President Anne Groton
  • Report from Secretary-Treasurer Tom Sienkewicz
  • Ad-Hoc Committee Reports
  • Upcoming Deadlines
  • 116th Annual Meeting of CAMWS
  • 2019-20 Award and Scholarship Opportunities
  • CPL Funding in Action
  • Reports from Previous Award Winners
  • New in The Classical Journal
  • New in Teaching Classical Languages
  • CAMWS News and Announcements
  • News from Our Institutional Members
  • Notices from Other Classical Organizations
  • Job Postings
  • Honoring Latin Teachers
  • 2019-20 CAMWS Committee Members
  • 2019-20 CAMWS State, Provincial, and Regional Vice-Presidents
  • 2019-20 Financial Contributors
  • Membership
  • CAMWS Members in the News
  • Classics in the News
  • Obitus Recentes
  • Submissions
Quick Links
FROM THE PRESIDENT
Dear colleagues,

I am so very grateful to the 200+ of you who are serving on CAMWS committtees and task forces this year, or keeping watch over your state, province, or region as a Vice-President, or making policy decisions as members of the Executive Committee! People may wrongly assume that CAMWS is a “top down“ organization; on the contrary, it is “horizontal” in the best sense of the word, and we are always striving to extend our reach and broaden our perspectives. 

This is the crunch time of year for the CAMWS Program Committee: after evaluating all of the proposals for panels and workshops, we are busy reading through the more than 300 abstracts that have been submitted for individual papers. We hope to be finished by late this month. Proposals for round-table discussions will be next, followed in January by abstracts submitted for the new undergraduate poster session. If you run into any of the hard-working, and by now quite bleary-eyed, members of the Program Committee, please thank them for their indispensable service to CAMWS: Jennifer Ferriss-Hill (University of Miami [FL]), Ellen Greene (University of Oklahoma), Keely Lake (Wayne State University [MI]), Vassiliki Panoussi (College of William and Mary), Zoe Stamatopoulou (Washington University in St. Louis [MO]), and Timothy Wutrich (Case Western Reserve University [OH]), along with ex-officio members Andrew Faulkner (University of Waterloo [ON]), Past President of CAMWS, and David Schenker (University of Missouri), CAMWS President Elect. You may enjoy reading the abstracts from the accepted panels ( https://camws.org/node/1540) and the accepted workshops ( https://camws.org/node/1541). We are particularly excited about the panel (“ E Pluribus Unum: The Challenge and Opportunities of ‘Diversity’ for Classics and for CAMWS”) organized by the CAMWS ad-hoc Committee on Diversity and Inclusion; the Women’s Classical Caucus has kindly agreed to co-sponsor the panel and a reception afterwards.

Those of you planning to attend the annual meeting in Birmingham next spring (March 25-28) are in for a treat. The local committee is a congenial mix of classicists from ten different Alabama schools, colleges, and universities, all under the dynamic leadership of Randy Todd, Doug Clapp, Andy Montgomery, and Shannon Flynt from Samford University. The campus is beautiful and has stellar facilities. The Hyatt Regency (Wynfrey) Hotel not only abounds in meeting rooms, banquet halls, and spaces for exhibits and displays, but also houses its own restaurant, Merk’s Tavern & Kitchen, which serves three meals daily. The adjacent mall (Riverchase Galleria) offers many delights, as do the celebrated eating establishments that seem to be everywhere in the area. If you would like to explore Birmingham, it would be helpful to have a car, but the hotel’s courtesy shuttle service will gladly deliver you to and from your destination, be it the moving Civil Rights Institute, the kid-friendly McWane Science Center, or 56-foot-tall Vulcan, the largest cast-iron statue in the world. I encourage you to take inspiration from the blacksmith god and strive to “forge” lasting connections with your fellow classicists by attending the CAMWS meeting of MMXX in Birmingham. 

Anne Groton
President
FROM THE SECRETARY-TREASURER
Dear fellow CAMWSians:

As you may be aware, CAMWS operates on a fiscal year beginning July 1st and ending June 30th. I am happy to report that the organization ended its FY18-19 in fiscally-sound condition with an individual member total of 1514 (the highest since FY12-13, when membership reached 1543).

The fiscal future of CAMWS appears even brighter since the organization received the news that it is one of fifteen classical organizations named as equal beneficiaries of an $8 million, non-endowed fund established with the Philadelphia Foundation by Dr. Rudolph Masciantonio, who taught Latin in the Philadelphia Public Schools for many years and died on September 23, 2016. You can read more about Dr. Masciantonio and his bequest elsewhere in this newsletter or at https://camws.org/node/1571.

Another piece of good news is that CAMWS’s efforts to create a library of podcasts is coming to fruition, thanks to the good work of its newly-appointed podcaster, Sam Kindick of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Sam recently posted an interview with Andrew C. Johnston of Yale University, recipient of a 2019 CAMWS First Book Prize for The Sons of Remus: Identity in Roman Gaul and Spain (Harvard University Press, 2017). You can listen to this podcast and others at https://camws.org/podcast.

The members of the CAMWS Executive Committee have been very busy of late dealing with a variety of important matters. In response to current issues in our profession, the Executive Committee has made a formal Statement on CAMWS and Political Involvement affirming that CAMWS is an apolitical organization which welcomes as members persons of all political, social and religious convictions, and supports classicists and classics programs in the CAMWS region and beyond. 

CAMWS has also formed an ad-hoc Committee on Diversity and Inclusion, chaired by Theodore Tarkow of the University of Missouri. Other members of the committee include Leanna L. Boychenko of Loyola University Chicago (IL), Dennis C. Dickerson, Jr. of Christian Brothers High School (TN), Benjamin S. Haller of Virginia Wesleyan University, Jeffrey J. Namiotka of Western Reserve Academy (OH), Anna Peterson of Pennsylvania State University, Lisa M. Piacesi of Camp Creek Middle School (GA), Angela L. Pitts of University of Mary Washington (VA), and Heather L . Vincent of Eckerd College (FL). This committee has hit the ground running by writing a charter and planning both a panel and a round-table discussion for the 2020 meeting in Birmingham. Elsewhere in this newsletter you can read a report from Ted Tarkow outlining some of the committee’s other plans. An amendment to the CAMWS constitution to make this ad-hoc committee a standing committee will be on the agenda of the annual Business Meeting in Birmingham. 

The Executive Committee has agreed that, in the future, CAMWS will continue its traditional practice of having its Annual Meeting sponsored by one or more of the local schools, colleges, or universities. However, the question of whether to hold all of the sessions and events in a hotel or to hold some of them on the campus of a sponsoring institution is still being discussed. At the direction of the Executive Committee, President Anne Groton has appointed a Task Force on Meetings, which will evaluate the options and submit a report, along with recommendations, to the Executive Committee by the end of this calendar year. The Task Force is chaired by Peter Knox of Case Western Reserve University (OH). Other members include Brian M. Duvick of University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, Angela L. Pitts at the University of Mary Washington (VA), Martin P. Shedd of Hendrix College (AR), Holly M. Sypniewski of Millsaps College (MS), and T. Davina McClain of Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern State University (LA), who as CAMWS Secretary-Treasurer Elect, serves as a non-voting ex-officio member. CAMWS meetings through 2024 have already been planned. (These are listed here: https://camws.org/meeting/future.php.) The Executive Committee has granted the Secretary-Treasurer and the Secretary-Treasurer Elect flexibility in the site-selection process for 2025: they may choose to propose a meeting with all sessions and events held in a hotel or a meeting with some of its sessions and events held on the campus of a sponsoring institution.

Another ad-hoc Committee established by President Groton is charged with making recommendations regarding the $27800 CAMWS has raised so far for its Teacher Training Initiative. (If you have not yet contributed to this fund, it is not too late to do so here: https://camws.org/donate.) The chair of this committee is Fanny L. Dolansky of Brock University (ON), whose preliminary report appears elsewhere in this newsletter. Other members of this committee include Catherine C. Keane of Washington University in St. Louis (MO), Thomas Garvey of The Meadows School (NV), Charles T. Ham of Grand Valley State University (MI), and Benjamin C. Holec of Bishop Ireton High School (VA).

I would like to thank the members of these ad-hoc committees and task forces, as well as the members of all CAMWS standing committees, the regional, state and provincial vice presidents and the other officers of the organization for their willingness to devote their time and energy to making CAMWS the best possible organization it can be. 

Finally, I would like to let you know that the CAMWS office has already begun its transition from Monmouth, Illinois, to Natchitoches, Louisiana. (In the upcoming months we are all going to have to learn how to spell and pronounce “Natchitoches” [similar to “Pack-A-Dish”].) Davina McClain has been shadowing me since she was elected Secretary-Treasurer Elect at the 2019 Business Meeting in Lincoln and has started taking on some duties of the office. Early in the new year she will hire an administrative assistant who will work with Jevanie Gillen in the final stages of preparation for the 2020 meeting and will also work at registration in Birmingham. I am confident that CAMWS will be in good hands when my term ends on June 30, 2020.

I look forward to seeing many of you at the 2020 meeting in Birmingham. 

Tom Sienkewicz
Secretary-Treasurer
AD HOC COMMITTEE REPORTS
Committee on Diversity and Inclusion
Ted Tarkow, Chair

Among the important achievements of CAMWS earlier this year was the establishment of an ad hoc Committee on Diversity and Inclusion.* In its first few months, the nine members of the Committee (listed later in this issue and on the CAMWS website) have hit the ground running: organizing a panel (“ E PLURIBUS UNUM: The challenge and opportunities of “diversity” for Classics and for CAMWS) and proposing a Round Table for the 2020 CAMWS convention in Birmingham, AL. We have also begun to initiate connections with analogous committees in other classical organizations, which should prove useful as we work collectively on these matters. Perhaps most important, we have clearly realized both the scope and the importance of the broad charge to this committee; this includes three broad categories which will guide our planning and our efforts.

  1. Who are our students? Our teachers? The schools in which we are present, or not present? Are we as diverse and inclusive as we might be? What possible steps might CAMWS undertake in a concerted effort to make positive progress on all of this?
  2. What texts that we teach (or at present do not teach) and study are potential allies and/or the opposite? How might be use them to address issues of diversity and inclusion while simultaneously keeping our focusses on language, literature, mythology, and the other rich and vital parts of our arsenal?
  3. Who and what are the audiences we must honestly deal with? From the naïve misunderstanding and/or sheltered unawareness of well-intentioned people to outright and deliberate distortion and falsification of the classical world by such vocal antagonists as the alt. right, we have a Herculean challenge as we move forward. What initiatives might the organization as a whole undertake?

In connection with all of this, the Committee invites members to contact us (even before the annual meeting in Birmingham) so that we can be inclusive in our deliberations: would a repository of syllabi of representative courses be useful? Would annual awards (and the local and regional publicity that regularly follow) be useful? Are we taking steps so that minority members of our profession are selected as committee chairs and/or proposed for elected offices? Would Summer Institutes, featuring exemplary teachers and a curriculum based on issues and texts showcasing “diversity” and “inclusion” be a good goal for the future/?

Please send any thoughts on these and all other relevant topics to the Committee Chair, Ted Tarkow, ( diversity@camws.org; 573-882-4996) or save them until we all get together in Birmingham. 

*A proposal to amend the constitution and thereby to make this a Standing Committee is intended for the Birmingham convention.
Teacher Training Initiative Subcommittee
Fanny Dolansky, Chair

The Teacher Training Initiative Subcommittee is an ad hoc committee comprised of K-12 teachers and college and university professors that was formed this past summer. The committee is in the early stages of generating ideas about initiatives that will have a significant impact on teaching training and particularly on recruitment. Committee members have been sharing ideas and will be reaching out to colleagues and former students who are K-12 teachers for their input.

Fanny Dolansky ( tti@camws.org), Associate Professor
Department of Classics, Brock University
UPCOMING DEADLINES
Monday, November 18, 2019


Friday, December 6, 2019


Wednesday, January 15, 2020


Thursday, January 30, 2020

116TH ANNUAL MEETING OF CAMWS:
SNEAK PREVIEW
AT THE INVITATION OF
The 116th meeting of CAMWS will take place March 25-28, 2020, in Birmingham, Alabama at the Hyatt Regency Birmingham — The Wynfrey Hotel at the invitation of Samford University. Registration information willl be posted in November.

Conference room rates at the Hyatt are $139/night for 2 Queen Beds or 1 King Bed. Complimentary wi-fi in room. For more information about room amenities, go here. To make room reservations at the Hyatt, go here.

The deadline for submission of Round-table discussion proposals has been extended and must now be received by 11:59 p.m. on Friday, November 15, 2019

President Anne Groton plans to have a session of undergraduate poster presentations at the meeting. Here is the Call for Abstracts. Poster abstracts must be received by 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, January 15, 2020.

The Local Committee offers this website filled with information about the Pittsburgh of the South: Join CAMWS in Birmingham.




The Local Committee for CAMWS 2020 in Birmingham invites
you to come on down to Alabama next March.
CAMWS 2020 Panels
The Program Committee plans to announce decisions regarding individual abstracts by mid-November,
 
(Sponsored by the Graduate Student Issues Committee)
E.L. Meszaros (Brown University), organizer and presider

 

Organized by the CAMWS Ad-hoc Committee on Diversity and Inclusion
Sponsored by the Women’s Classical Caucus
Ted Tarkow (University of Missouri), orangizer and presider

 

Rosemary L. Moore (University of Iowa), organizer
Theodora Kopestonsky (University of Tennessee), presider      

 

Aldo Tagliabue (University of Notre Dame), organizer and presider

 

Teresa Ramsby (University of Massachusetts Amherst),
co-organizer and presider
John Gruber-Miller (Cornell College), co-organizer

 

Tyler Jo Smith (University of Virginia), co-organizer and presider
Dylan K. Rogers (University of Virginia), co-organizer

 

Elizabeth T. Neely (The Ohio State University), organizer
Julia Nelson-Hawkins (The Ohio State University), presider

 

Anthony L. Hollingsworth (Roger Williams University), organizer
TBA, presider

 

Nicholas Cross (Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy), organizer
TBA, presider

 

Brian M. Duvick (University of Colorado at Colorado Springs), organizer
TBA, presider



Nicholas R. Rockwell (University of Colorado Denver), organizer
Christopher Eckerman (University of Oregon), presider



Lauren Ginsberg (University of Cincinnati) and Virginia Closs (University of Massachusetts Amherst), co-organizers
Isabel Koster (University of Colorado Boulder), presider



Kelly E. Shannon-Henderson (University of Alabama), co-organizer and presider
Salvador Bartera (Mississippi State University), co-organizer


 
Christopher Nappa (University of Minnesota) and Rachael Cullick (Oklahoma State University), co-organizers
Stephen C. Smith (University of Minnesota), presider



Roger T. Macfarlane (Brigham Young University), organizer
Stephen R. Todd (Samford University), presider

CAMWS 2020 Workshops
Holly Sypniewski (Millsaps College), organizer and presider
Lindsay Samson (Spellman College), presenter
Halford Haskell (Southwestern University), presenter
Mary Hamil Gilbert (Birmingham Southern University), presenter

 
Jennifer S. Moss (Wayne State University), organizer
Mary Pendergraft (Wake Forest University), presider
Mary Christine English (Montclair State University), presenter

 
Victoria E. Pagan (University of Florida), organizer and presider
Julie Mebane (Indiana University), presenter
Megan Daly (University of Florida), presenter
Brandon Jones (Boston University), presenter
Salvador Bartera (Mississippi State University), presenter
Richard Thomas (Harvard University), presenter

 
(Sponsored by the Graduate Student Issues Committee)
Sarah C. Keith (University of Michigan), organizer and presider

 
Garrett Jacobsen (Denison University), organizer
TBA, presider
Garrett Jacobsen (Denison University), presenter

 
Amy Pistone (Gonzaga University), organizer and presider
Tara Mulder (University of British Columbia), presenter

 
(Presidential Workshop)
Christopher Bungard (Butler University), organizer
Anne Groton (St. Olaf College), presider
Christopher Bungard (Butler University), presenter
Nikki Carroll (Trinity Episcopal School), presenter
Martin Shedd (Hendrix College), presenter

 
Mary L. Pendergraft (Wake Forest University), organizer and presenter
Jennifer Sheridan Moss (Wayne State University), presider
Lauren Rogers (Salem Academy), presenter 
2019-20 AWARD AND SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES
Book Prizes for Authors
Nota Bene: Applications for book awards close early in the year to allow the committee sufficient time for reading and evaluating. The deadline for 2019-20 was September 1st. The committees will, however, welcome early nominations for the 2020-21 award year.
Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award

The CAMWS Subcommittee for the Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award announces an annual call for nominations for the Award. The recipient of this $500.00 award will be announced at the annual CAMWS business meeting, where the recipient is encouraged to accept the award in person. This prize has been named in memory of Ladislaus J. Bolchazy in recognition of his long career promoting classical scholarship and pedagogy. The subcommittee asks for your help in identifying distinguished works of pedagogy, including textbooks, handbooks, anthologies or other works primarily intended for the classroom in the field of classical studies (including, but not limited to, the languages, literatures, history, religions, philosophy, art, architecture, archaeology, economy, and reception of Greek and Roman antiquity) published by CAMWS members in the past three years.

Preference will be given to language-based textbooks. The author of the nominated work shall be a member of the association in good standing in the year of the nomination and for at least the previous year. Nominations may be made by any publisher or by any member of CAMWS in good standing, including the author.

Criteria:

  • appropriateness for the target student audience
  • clarity of presentation
  • excellent quality
  • effective pedagogical practice and design
  • potential for broad impact

Nominations of pedagogical books should be sent to the chair of the subcommittee on the Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award at pedagogyaward@camws.org.

The annual deadline for nominations for the award is September 1st. The subcommittee may, at its sole discretion, retain an unsuccessful nomination for consideration in the following year.

The winning book is announced at the annual CAMWS business meeting.

CAMWS First Book Award

The Subcommittee on the CAMWS First Book Award asks for your help in identifying distinguished first scholarly books (or digital equivalents) in the field of classical studies (including, but not limited to, the languages, literatures, history, religions, philosophy, art, architecture, archaeology, economy, and reception of Greek and Roman antiquity) published by CAMWS members in 2017, 2018, or 2019. Self-nominations are encouraged. Please note that nominated authors must be members of the Association in good standing and for at least the previous year and that CAMWS has a separate award for pedagogical books (see Bolchazy Book Award). In the case of co-authored books, all authors must meet “first book” and membership eligibility requirements. 

Please send nominations, including titles and publishing information, to the committee chair by email ( firstbook@camws.org).

The Committee will close its list for the 2020 award on September 1, 2019.

Books published after that date may be considered for the 2021 award.

The current committee’s guidelines for awards include

  • excellent quality
  • wide significance within its genre
  • awareness of international trends in its field

All other factors being equal, the committee is looking for something that shifts the conversation substantially in the area covered by the book.

Recipients are encouraged to accept this award in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting.
Grants and Awards for Classroom Activities
CPL Award for Outstanding Promotional
Activity in the Schools

To support programs and activities in primary and secondary schools, the CAMWS Committee for the Promotion of Latin (CPL) annually recognizes with a plaque and a certificate the group which develops the most outstanding and effective activity for promoting Latin in CAMWS territory during each academic year (including the preceding summer). The winner of this award is announced every spring at the annual CAMWS meeting.

Projects supported by CPL grants are automatically eligible for this award.

Any other group wishing to compete for this award must be sponsored by a current CAMWS member and must submit a letter of application to the CPL chair at cpl@camws.org by January 30, 2020. The application letter must include a 100-word summary of the project and a more detailed project description not to exceed 500 words in length. Applicants are encouraged to attach supporting materials such as photographs, flyers, pertinent newspaper articles, etc.

Recipients are encouraged to accept this award in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting.

CAMWS Travel Grant for High School Groups

CAMWS Travel Grants for High School Groups are designed for high school teachers who want to take their students on a trip to an excavation, exhibit or historic site(s) that both enhances their learning experience and furthers their interest in Classical Studies. The grant supports both domestic and international travel. 

Requests for funds up to $2000 may be submitted, but every effort will be made to share these resources in smaller amounts among as many schools as possible.

Proposals should include a budget, the dates of the projected trip and a detailed description of the planned activities, including a time line; proposals for support of participation in an excavation should include a letter from the excavation director detailing the students’ responsibilities.

The proposals will be judged by Committee for the Promotion of Latin. Questions pertaining to the preparation of a proposal should be directed to the committee chair at cpl@camws.org.

Upon their return recipients of a CPL Travel Grant are required to provide documentation of their participation in the originally proposed activity, a brief report on the outcomes of the travel, including issues that may have occurred and that may be considered by the grant committee in the future, and a summary of this activity, including photographs, for publication in the CAMWS newsletter and on the website for the grant. Award payments will be made only after this report is submitted.

Applications for the CPL Travel Grant for High School Groups may be submitted by high school teachers who hold a current individual membership in CAMWS.

Applications will be reviewed in two groups. The deadline for consideration for fall requests is September 30, and the deadline for spring and summer requests is January 30.
Teacher Training and New Teacher Grants
Manson A. Stewart Teacher Training Awards

The Manson A. Stewart Teacher Training Award is named after Prof. Manson A. Stewart, who taught Classics at Yankton College in South Dakota from 1909 until 1948. This award was established as part of a bequest by his wife, Ruth Reed Stewart. 

Teacher Training Awards: Designed to provide some financial assistance to those who wish to obtain certification to teach Latin at the primary through the secondary level, whether the specific courses are needed in Latin or in Education. The award is not intended to cover all costs of the training, and the size of the award varies according to the actual costs (primarily tuition and travel), the size of the committee’s budget, and the number of applications. Previous awards have been as high as $2050. Applicants must be current CAMWS members.

Note that CAMWS also provides other grants and awards for teachers:


To apply for a Teacher Training Award, please fill out this on-line application. Deadline for receipt of applications is January 30, 2020.

Manson A. Stewart Travel Awards

The Manson A. Stewart Travel Award is named after Prof. Manson A. Stewart, who taught Classics at Yankton College in South Dakota from 1909 until 1948. This award was established as part of a bequest by his wife, Ruth Reed Stewart. 

Manson A. Stewart Travel Awards: Designed primarily to assist K-12 teachers with cash awards to offset the costs of attending CAMWS meetings, including the cost of a substitute teacher. Graduate students and contingent faculty are also eligible for these awards, which are not intended to cover all costs of the travel. The size of the award varies according to the actual cost the travel will entail, the size of the committee’s budget, and the number of applications. Preference will be given to individuals who have not previously received this award. Awards for travel to meetings have ranged from $150 $700; for travel to a Southern Section meeting, somewhat less. Applicants must be current CAMWS members.
 
To apply for a Travel Award, please fill out this on-line application.

Deadline for grant applications for Manson A. Stewart Travel Awards to attend the 2020 CAMWS meeting in Birmingham is January 30, 2020.

Recipients are expected to accept these awards in person at the business meeting held at the conference.

For questions about these awards, please contact the chair of the Subcommittee for the Manson A. Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards, at stewartteacher@camws.org.

CAMWS Awards for New Teachers

CAMWS invites new K-12 teachers of Latin and ancient Greek to apply for the following awards, administered by the Subcommittee on the Manson Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards.

Student Loan Assistance For New Teachers Award

The Student Loan Assistance for New Teachers award, worth up to $1000.00 which may be awarded to one or more successful applicants, is designated to offset student loan debt for recent baccalaureate or M.A.T. recipients who are entering the teaching profession. This award is designed to ease the transition into employment and to enable young teachers to perform effectively despite financial constraints. Eligible candidates will be Latin teachers at the primary or secondary school level with student debt from a recent B.A. or M.A.T. degree. Applicants must be within the first five years of teaching and be teaching at least two sections of Latin or ancient Greek. Applicants must be members in good standing of CAMWS and must supply proof of student debt along with a letter of application, a CV providing information of education and relevant employment history, a statement (no more than 500 words) detailing the applicant’s accomplishments within the field of classics, a statement (500 words) detailing the applicant’s teaching aspirations at his or her teaching institution and a letter of recommendation from the school. This award can only be received once.

The award will be granted on both merit and need-based factors. Merit will be evaluated on the basis of the applicant’s graduation GPA, major field GPA, narratives of achievements in classics and teaching aspirations and the strength of the principal’s recommendation. Need will be evaluated on the basis of total student debt. Preference will be given to an applicant with greater debt when other factors between applicants are evaluated equally.

Apply here on-line.

New Teacher Start-Up Funds Award

The New Teacher Start Up Funds Award is a start-up grant for new teachers designed to offset the costs of materials and supplies purchased for classroom instruction. Funds from the Award may be used to reimburse purchase of texts and research materials, classroom supplies, or classroom technology (including computer software or subscription fees for online materials) to be used in classroom instruction; the award may not be used for purchase of computer or tablet for personal use. The total amount of this award is $500 which may be awarded to one or more successful applicants. Eligible applicants are new primary and secondary school Latin teachers within the first five years of their profession. Applicants must be members in good standing of CAMWS and must submit a receipt of purchase for classroom materials, a letter of application that details the use of said materials for classroom instruction,and the educational goals to be met by classroom utilization of these materials, a letter of support from the principal, and a current CV providing information of education and relevant employment history. This award can only be received once.

  • Award for reimbursement of pedagogical and classroom materials.
  • May not include computer or tablet for personal use.
  • Books, promotional materials, art supplies for class enrichment activities, software or database subscriptions with clear classroom applicability
  • Must be for durable goods, not consumable items (e.g., refreshments for a party)
  • Award will be give on basis of merit and need; merit will be evaluated on
  • strength of narrative of how resources will be used (statement in letter of application uploaded as PDF or cut and paste)
  • strength of educational goals to be met with resources (statement in letter of application uploaded as PDF or cut and paste)
  • strength of the principal’s recommendation.

Apply here on-line for Start-Up Funds.

Deadline for grant applications is January 30, 2020.

For questions about these awards, please contact the chair of the Subcommmittee for the Manson Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards, at stewartteacher@camws.org.

The recipients of this award are announced at the annual business meeting.
Teaching Awards for K-12 and College/University Teachers
Kraft Award for Excellence in Secondary School Teaching

Named for CAMWS Benefactor Eunice E. Kraft of Western Michigan University, this award recognizes outstanding Teachers of Latin in public or private schools (Middle Schools included). The honoree receives $500, airfare to the annual meeting and two nights’ accomodation at the convention hotel. The honoree is encouraged to accept this award in person at this meeting.

The nominee must be a member in good standing of CAMWS. Both full- and part-time teachers (who teach at least half-time with a mininum of five years teaching experience) are eligible for this award. Nominees will be eligible for consideration for three consecutive years, provided that CAMWS membership remains current in each year of consideration. No previous winner of the Kraft Award is eligible to apply for it a second time.

The Subcommittee’s Criteria for Excellent Teaching are available on the CAMWS website.

To Apply: The nomination deadline is November 15, 2020. The deadline for receipt of all application materials is December 20, 2020. If you would like to nominate someone for the award visit the Online Nomination Form. When this form is submitted, the nominee will receive an email informing him or her of this nomination and explaining the application process. Only one nomination is needed. Multiple nominations do not affect a candidate’s evaluation.

If you have any questions, please contact the chair of the Subcommittee on Teaching Awards at teaching@camws.org.

CAMWS Award for Excellence in College Teaching

This award recognizes outstanding college and university teachers of Classics. The honoree receives $500 and is encouraged to accept the award in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting.

The nominee must be a member in good standing of CAMWS and teach classical subjects at a college or university. Both full- and part-time teachers (who teach at least half-time with a mininum of five years teaching experience) are eligible for this award. Nominees will be eligible for consideration for three consecutive years, provided that CAMWS membership remains current in each year of consideration. No previous winner of the award is eligible to apply a second time.

The Subcommittee’s Criteria for Excellent Teaching are available on the CAMWS website.

To Apply: The nomination deadline is November 15, 2020, and the deadline for all application materials is December 20, 2020. Nominees who have not already been recognized through a national teaching award will be given preference. No sitting member of the CAMWS Executive Committee or of the CAMWS Subcommittee on Teaching Awards is eligible for this award. If you would like to nomiate someone for the award visit the Online Nomination Form. Upon submission of this form, the nominee will receive an email message informing him or her of the nomination and explaining the application process. Only one nomination is needed. Multiple nominations do not affect a candidate’s evaluation.

If you have any questions, please contact the chair of the Subcommittee on Teaching Awards at teaching@camws.org.
Travel Grants for Students and High School Teachers
CAWMS Summer Travel Awards

CAMWS offers a number of Summer Travel Awards to graduate students and teachers of Classics (Greek, Latin, Classical Art & Archaeology and Ancient History) at the pre-collegiate (primary, secondary, or high school) level the opportunity to advance research and/or pedagogical interests abroad in Athens, Rome, or other appropriate ancient site. Award amounts cover program costs (tuition, basic room and board) as per the AAR and ASCSA summer school or other program web sites. Airfare and other transportation expenses are excluded.

The William T. Semple Award is a full fellowship for attending the Summer Session of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens only. (Applicants for ASCSA Summer Seminars should apply for the Benario Award.) This award is named in honor of William T. Semple of the University of Cincinnati.

The Mary A. Grant Award is a full fellowship for attending the summer session of the American Academy in Rome. This award is named in honor of Mary A. Grant of the University of Kansas.

The Janice and Herbert Benario Award is a fellowship that the recipient may apply to the summer travel (not fieldwork or conference) program of his or her choice. Amount is contingent upon program cost, up to $3000. An applicant for the Benario Award must submit an itemized budget of program costs (no travel expenses) at the time of application. This award is named in honor of Herbert and Janice Benario of Emory University. 

In certain circumstances CAMWS may offer additional summer travel awards.

To be eligible for a these awards, an applicant must be a current member of CAMWS who either:

  • holds a teaching position in Greek or Latin in an elementary or secondary school within CAMWS territory (camws.org/about/map.php); or
  • is enrolled as a graduate student in a degree-granting Classics program within CAMWS territory (camws.org/about/map.php).

CAMWS members teaching at or students at a school outside CAMWS territory are eligible to apply for these awards if their schools are current institutional members of CAMWS ( https://camws.org/institutionalmembership). Preference will be given to applicants who have not received one of these travel awards in the past four years (teachers) or two years (graduate students).

Priority for the Benario Award will be given to applicants interested in summer programs other than those of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens and the American Academy in Rome, which are normally funded by the Semple and Grant Awards. Many other programs can be funded with this award. Here is a list of programs which the Benario Award has supported in the past.

An individual cannot accept a Semple, Grant or Benario Award from CAMWS if (1) he or she receives any other award or scholarship for the same summer program and the combined amount of these awards would be more than the cost of the program and airfare, or (2) he or she receives another CAMWS summer travel award, such as the Excavation/Field School Award. Winners of the Semple, Grant and Benario Awards are free to apply for external funding to cover their airfare, which is not covered by the award.

On-line Application Form must be received by January 15, 2020. Please note that files must be complete (including all letters of recommendation) for candidates to receive an award. The subcommittee may read and rank incomplete files, but no incomplete file may receive the award.

If a recipient cannot accept the award by March 31, the award will be given to the runner-up. Recipients of these awards are encouraged to accept them in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting and are expected to submit a written, illustrated report for the CAMWS Newsletter.

Questions regarding the application may be directed to the chair of the Semple, Grant and Benario Subcommittee at sgb@camws.org.

CAMWS Excavation / Field School Awards

The Classical Association of the Middle West and South annually awards three $2000.00 scholarships for participation in summer excavation or field school at an archaeological site in the Greco-Roman world. These awards may support individuals engaged in any stage of the work, including physical excavation, illustration, digital recording, faunal and ceramic analysis. One of these awards is named in honor of former CAMWS president Peter Knox of Case Western University. Generally, one award will be made to at least one graduate student and another to an undergraduate, but teachers at all levels of instruction are also eligible for this award. Professional archaeologists are not eligible for this award. 

To be eligible for this award, one must be a current member of CAMWS who either

  • holds a teaching position in Greek or Latin in an elementary, secondary school or university within CAMWS territory
  • is enrolled as an undergraduate or graduate student in a degree-granting program in Classics or who is enrolled in a program in History, Art History, Anthropology or Archaeology with a primary academic focus on the Greco-Roman world.  

While priority will be given to applicants who have not had previous excavation experience in the Greco-Roman world, applicants returning to the field are also encouraged to apply.

This award is administered by the Subcommittee on the Excavation and Field School Award.

To apply for the award please submit this On-line Application Form by January 30th of each year. 

Please note that this application requires letters of recommentation. It would be wise for applicants to discuss this with prospective recommenders early and warn them about this due date.

Recipients are encouraged to accept the award in person at the annual CAMWS business meeting and are expected to submit a written, illustrated report for the CAMWS Newsletter.

Note: An individual who wins this archaeology fieldwork award cannot also receive a Semple, Grant Award or Benario Award from CAMWS in the same year.

Please note that an individual cannot accept this award from CAMWS if he or she receives another award or scholarship for this fieldschool and the combined amount of these awards would be more than the cost of the fieldschool.

Undergraduate Student Awards
Faculty-Undergraduate Collaborative Research Projects

The CAMWS Undergraduate Awards Sub-Committee annually awards up to two research grants supporting collaborative research between a faculty member and an undergraduate. These awards can be for up to $1,000 each. Applications are due by December 6th every year.

Guidelines:

These awards are intended to support faculty research collaborations in Classics (any sub-discipline) with undergraduate students. Faculty-student pairs may be from institutions with graduate programs, but the student involved must be in an undergraduate.

Applications should include statements from the faculty and student researchers outlining the nature of the project, giving a prospective timeline for the project, an account of the respective responsibilities and intellectual contributions of faculty member and student, as well as a budget indicating how the money will be spent (the award covers such expenses as books, supplies, and travel for the student but not honoraria). The application should also indicate whether the project is receiving support from the applicant’s home institution. Finally the application should describe what the research pair envisages the nature of the final product to be, and what contribution it is intended to make to the field. We encourage presentation of the projects at a future CAMWS meeting. The faculty member participating in this project must be a current CAMWS member at the time of application. The undergraduate does not. If awarded the grant, the undergraduate will receive a complimentary membership in CAMWS for the year of the grant.

A final report is due to the CAMWS office at the end of the project (no later than a semester after the receipt of the award). The report is to include statements by both student and faculty as well as a summary report about the money spent. Any funds remaining are to be returned to CAMWS after the final report is submitted.

The award of up to $1000 will be paid to the Department or a suitable institutional office. The contribution of the faculty member will also be recognized by CAMWS (on CAMWS website, program, and by a letter sent to the faculty member’s chair).


For further information, contact the chair of the CAMWS Undergraduate Awards Sub-Committee at undergraduate@camws.org.

Manson A. Stewart Undergraduate Awards

The Manson A. Stewart Undergraduate Award is named after Prof. Manson A. Stewart, who taught Classics at Yankton College in South Dakota from 1909 until 1948. This award was established as part of a bequest by his wife, Ruth Reed Stewart. 

The award, originally a scholarship paid to the undergraduate student’s instutution to cover tuition, is now paid directly to the student as a recognition of academic achievement and potential in the study of Classics.

Teachers of undergraduate students are invited to nominate their most outstanding young Classicists for the CAMWS Manson Stewart Undergraduate Awards. Every year CAMWS makes $1,000.00 awards (accompanied by a one-year membership in CAMWS) to a limited number of undergraduate students majoring in Classics at the sophomore or junior level at a CAMWS college or university. Nominees are expected to take a minimum of two courses in Latin or Greek (normally at least one per quarter or semester) during the junior or senior year in which the award is made.

Students are to be nominated by a department or program; no institution may nominate more than two students per year. The individual who fills out the nomination form on behalf of the department must be an individual member of CAMWS. Each nominee must fill out an application form, write a brief essay, and submit a college or university transcript and two letters of recommendation. Those who write the two letters of recommendations do not need to be CAMWS members. Applicants will indicate on their application the academic purpose for which they intend to use this award money (e.g., tuition, books, academic travel, etc.).

Nominations must be received by January 6, 2020

If you represent a department wishing to nominate a student, you can do so by completing this on-line nomination form

Applications must be received on-line by January 30, 2020.

Please note that a student can receive this award only once.

If you have any questions, please contact the chair of the CAMWS Undergraduate Award Committee at undergraduate@camws.org.

The recipients of these awards are announced at the annual business meeting.

CAMWS Award for Outstanding Accomplishment
in High School or Undergraduate Classical Studies

Recipients of this award are nominated by their school, college or university and receive a complimentary one-year membership in CAMWS for the following academic year, including an electronic subscription to The Classical Journal and access to the Loeb Classical Library On-Line and a subscription to Greek Keys. To nominate students for this award, please use this Award Designation Form. Nominators must be current institutional members of CAMWS. CAMWS congratulates all these fine scholars. For a list of previous recipients of this award, see Institutional Members Of CAMWS 2000-Present.

James Ruebel Undergraduate Travel Award

James Ruebel Undergraduate Travel Awards are available for undergraduate students to attend the annual CAMWS meeting (not CAMWS-SS). These awards honor James Ruebel of Ball State University (and CAMWS President in 2001-2002) who was especially dedicated to undergraduate education. The size of the award varies according to the actual cost the travel will entail, the size of the committee’s budget, and the number of applications.Priority will be given to students with experience in the ancient languages who are specifically planning to teach languages at the secondary school level over students who are non-language track students (e.g., Classical Civilization majors or other majors with minimum language requirements). Priority will also be given to students currently enrolled in a B.A. granting program over a recent graduate of a B.A. program. Preference will also be given to individuals who have not previously received this award. Applicants must be current CAMWS members.

To apply for a Travel Award, please fill out this on-line application.

Deadline for grant applications for James Ruebel Undergraduate Travel Awards to attend the 2020 CAMWS meeting in Birmingham is January 30, 2020.

Recipients are expected to accept these awards in person at the business meeting held at the conference.

For questions about these awards, please contact the chair of the Subcommittee for the Manson A. Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards, at stewartteacher@camws.org.
Language Awards
CAMWS Latin Translation Contest

The Classical Association of the Middle West and South offers cash prizes, book awards, and awards of commendation to qualifying winners in its School Awards Latin Translation Contests for High School students and for College/University students.

Registration for this exam is due annually by November 15


Administration of this exam takes place during the last week in November and the first week in December (but please check Important Upcoming CAMWS Dates and Deadlines for specific dates for this year).

Winners will be announced at or just before the annual CAMWS meeting.

CAMWS has offered a Latin Translation Contest since 1986. Until 1997 one poetry and one prose exam were offered each year. Since 1998 one exam has been offered each year, with an annual poetry / prose alternation. In 2015 intermediate and advanced levels of competition were introduced and college students became eligible to participate. For more details, see this Contest History.

All questions about this contest should be directed to the Chair of the Subcommittee on School Awards at schoolawards@camws.org.

CAMWS College Greek Exam

Χαῖρε! The College Greek Exam (CGE) is the first and only nationally standardized exam for assessing students in their first year of college-level Greek (normally in their second semester). In addition to the standard exam for first-year students, CAMWS offers an Attic Tragedy exam.

The syllabus and information about previous exams are posted at camws.org/cgehistory. The grammatical material is not geared toward any specific textbook but is based on frequency of forms and constructions, chosen with the idea that these are fundamental concepts for any beginning reader of ancient Greek (Attic or Koine). Similarly, the vocabulary is chosen on the basis of frequency across a wide variety of texts and with the idea that the list will constitute a useful core for readers of diverse interests. The syllabus, previous exams, reports, and more are posted as well. The Attic Tragedy Exam results from a collaboration with the National Greek Exam. The syllabus and format ( linked here) are the same. This exam should be administered to undergraduates at the intermediate or advanced.

Medals and ribbons are awarded as prizes. in addition the Ed Phinney Award is awarded to any student earing a perfect score (or the highest score) on the elementary exam. The Intermediate College Greek Exam Prize is awarded to the students earning the highest score on the intermediate exam.

Please submit this form to request exam administration materials. Requests for spring administration should be received by January 30. Those schools teaching Greek 102 in fall instead of spring should request administration materials by October 31. The spring exams will be admistered the week of March 11-15. If you need to administer tests during the alternative week, March 4-8, please make note of that when registering or notify the CGE Chair at cge@camws.org. Completed exams must be received by the CGE Committee no later than March 31.

For questions about this exam, please contact the CGE Chair at cge@camws.org.

Edward Phinney Book Prize

The Classical Association of the Middle West and South has established the Edward Phinney Book Prize, to be awarded to any student receiving a perfect score (or coming closest to a perfect score) on the College Greek Exam.

After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of California Berkeley (1963), Phinney joined the Classics department at the University of Massachusetts in 1969, where he became an important advocate for educational technology and distance learning. With Patricia Bell he was the author of the Cambridge Latin Course. He died in 1996. 

Since 2008, the College Greek Exam (CGE) has been providing a national exam for college students in Beginning Greek courses. The exam is administered in fall and spring to students enrolled in the second semester of elementary Greek. For information, reports and previous exams, visit www.dramata.com. In addition to the Phinney award, students compete for medals and ribbons. To participate in the exam, contact the Chair of the CGE Committee at cge@camws.org.

Intermediate College Greek Exam Prize

This prize is awarded to the student(s) earning the highest score on the Intermediate College Greek Exam.
Other Awards
Presidential Award for Outstanding Graduate Student Paper

The Presidential Award for the Outstanding Graduate Student Paper is given at the Annual Meeting. Eligible are graduate students whose paper is accepted on the program and who will not have received their Ph.D. by the time it is read. The full text of the oral talk is submitted in advance of the meeting and an ad hoc committee selects the winner. The award (with a prize of $200 plus a one-year membership in the Society for Classical Studies) is presented at the annual business meeting.

There are two criteria for evaluation: (1) the quality of the scholarly argument, including the importance of the topic, the originality of the treatment, and demonstrated familiarity with scholarship; (2) indication of an effective oral presentation, based on the quality of the writing, overall organization, and interest to an audience. Any graduate student whose abstract has been accepted by the program committee may submit a complete text of the paper for consideration for this award.

The paper submitted for this award should be in the form actually to be delivered at the meeting (not a longer seminar paper on which the CAMWS paper is based). The paper should include a cover page with the following information: title of the paper, name of graduate student, academic affiliation and email address. Please do not submit a handout. All quotations should be included in the body of the paper and a bibliography provided at the end.

Those wishing to be considered for this award at the upcoming CAMWS meeting should submit their completed paper electronically to the CAMWS President at president@camws.org by February 28.

CAMWS Award for Special Service

The CAMWS Award for Special Service formally acknowledges exceptional promotion of classics and/or accomplishments for the profession in CAMWS territory. The award is given pro re nata.

Eligibility: CAMWS membership is not required. Recipients can be classicists or non-classicists who have made special contributions to the promotion of Latin and Classical studies, especially at the state and local level, in CAMWS territory. Ideal candidates include people involved in our field who do much for their local communities or classics in general, but do not interact frequently, if at all, at large meetings. Nevertheless, these people make MORE than a difference. Suitable candidates for this award also include parents or community members who support local Latin programs in notable ways; companies that donate money or other resources for the promotion of Latin; school administrators who help Latin teachers by giving access to school rooms or supplies or extra funds; newspapers or magazines that give free advertising for events; benefactors who give money for books or scholarships; or students who have promoted Latin in an original manner.

Nomination and selection process: Please submit a signed statement of nomination, 500-600 words in length, that describes the nominee and his/her work. Nominations for the award can be emailed to specialservice@camws.org (or mailed to CAMWS, 700 E. Broadway, Monmouth, IL 61462) but must be received by January 30. Supporting documents are not required, but they may be solicited if questions arise. The chair of the Steering Committee on Awards and Scholarships with advice from the five subcommittee chairs will then determine the winners. Announcement of the results will be made at the spring CAMWS meeting. If you have any questions about this award, please contact the Chair of the Steering Committee on Awards and Scholarships at steering@camws.org.

Ovationes

Each year since 1950 the Classical Association of the Middle West and South has awarded ovationes (honorary citations written in Latin and delivered at the CAMWS Annual Meeting) to members for their service to CAMWS and the Classics profession. The Latin texts are subsequently published in The Classical Journal.
CPL FUNDING IN ACTION
Reports from Travel Grant Recipients
Kristian Lorenzo
The Meadows School (Las Vegas, NV)

Thanks to a generous CPL Travel Grant from CAMWS a group of 40 enthusiastic JCL students from the middle and upper schools at The Meadows School visited the King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh exhibit at the California Science Center on Friday November 30th. The visit was a big hit with the students, many of whom had learned about the famous boy-pharaoh during their 6th-grade ancient history unit at The Meadows School. In fact they were so engrossed in the exhibit that they mistakenly believed that they could not take photos of any of the artefacts, but—thankfully—I snapped this picture of them just before we all entered the California Science Center, as well as some photos of the artefacts. This visit was a great way for the students to refresh their knowledge of King Tut. It also allowed them to expand that information with a greater appreciation of ancient Egyptian burial customs, beliefs about the afterlife, and the vast array of material wealth interred with even a relatively unimportant pharaoh. On behalf of myself, my colleague Dr. Thomas Garvey, and our ardent JCL students I would like to extend once again our appreciation to CAMWS for their award of a CPL Travel Grant.
Karilyn Sheldon
Concord Academy (Concord, MA)

Thanks to the generosity of CAMWS and the Committee for the Promotion of Latin, four students from Concord Academy received funds to support their travel and tuition costs for an archaeological field school held by the Caladinho Archaeological Project. The field school, which lasted three weeks in Redondo, in the Alentejo region of Portugal, gave these students unparalleled experience to work alongside professional archaeologists, college students, and graduate students from around the world to excavate a first century BCE Roman fortified structure (​ fortin​). These students not only learned systematic excavation methods but also learned how to process and analyze ancient artifacts — from ceramics to numismatics. In fact, some of the most exciting finds this year were coins; below you’ll see the Concord Academy students with their first coin discovered — a bronze coin from Celsa, Hispania with the head of Augustus! This coin alone made my students giddy with glee, elated to be able to touch a coin that perhaps last touched the hands of a Roman soldier over two thousand years ago. It was in this moment that years of studying history, toiling over declensions, and just a few days in the dirt became truly worth it for them.

While weekday mornings were spent excavating, the Concord Academy students who worked on the Caladinho Archaeological Project this summer balanced work with play by traveling to two ancient Roman cities. In Évora, Portugal, students stood at the steps of a Roman temple and wandered through the local archaeological museum and in Mérida, Spain, students stood before one of the largest extant Roman theaters and delivered impromptu soliloquies, pretended to be lions in the amphitheater’s animal cages, and wandered the gardens in the portico behind the ancient public complex. In conjunction with other field trips to Monsaraz, Rocha da Mina, Évoramonte, and Vila Viçosa, and traditional meals at local restaurants after work and for dinner each day, our students were able to gain an authentic cultural experience and come to understand what modern daily life in the Alentejo is like, as well.

Rather than continuing to describe the three week adventure myself, I’ll defer to my students. Michaela Trieloff (Class of 2019) reflected fondly on her newfound appreciation for the archaeological process this year: “...Before taking trowel and pickaxe to dirt, we took out tape measures and such and put pen to paper, drawing and documenting the shape and various points of altitude of the layer - documentation before destruction. However, the destruction portion that followed was definitely the most enjoyable...it led me to discover a coin - objectively epic.” Eric Yoon (Class of 2020) wrote in his postseason reflection: “​Work on site was everything I hoped for. I got to excavate real Roman and prehistoric pottery alongside professional archaeologists and I couldn’t have asked for more....All in all, the trip was nothing short of incredible. Everyone who was there was amazing in their own ways and impacted me individually. And for that, I would like to thank them and most of all you for allowing me to be a part of such a fun crew.”

The above testaments are just two of four that reveal the profound impact a summer under the golden Alentejan sun had on a small group of high schoolers. Thank you, CAMWS, for helping me to transform and enrich the lives of my students from Concord Academy. Your funds gave them all an invaluable, fragmented glimpse into the ancient past and, most importantly, the opportunity to begin to piece it together themselves.
On site in Week 1! Concord Academy students with Michaela’s find, a bronze coin from northern Hispania.
Pictured left to right:​ Colin Regenauer (Class of ‘19), Eric Yoon (Class of ‘20), Michaela Trieloff (Class of ‘19), Karilyn Sheldon (CA Latin Teacher & Caladinho Archaeological Project Field School Director), Hans Toulmin (Class of ‘21).
Michaela with her find!
Michaela Trieloff making dirty dirt clean dirt with expert command of the trowel.
Hans Toulin washing pottery and showing that a toothbrush has an important archaeological role to play.
Above left:​ Eric Yoon (right) drawing a stratigraphic layer before excavation. ​Above right: Eric Yoon and Colin Regenauer taking elevations — the final step before excavation of a stratigraphic unit.
Field Trip Fun!
Above Left​: Hans Toulmin (center) with some of the crew in the arena of the amphitheater in ​Mérida, Spain. Above Right​: Hans (right) posing as a caged animal below the cavea of the amphitheater.
The Caladinho 2019 crew takes the stage the ancient one, that is at the Roman theater in Mérida.
Sunset at ​Évoramonte, week three.
Jennie Luongo
Saint Andrews Episcopal School (Austin TX)

Lauren Dill and I traveled with eighteen students to Italy this summer for seventeen days of exploring sites near Vesuvius and in the city of Rome, with a final two days in Tuscany. During the trip, we witnessed incredible growth in our students both intellectually and personally. 

Receiving the CAMWS Travel Grant allowed us to add enriching experiences that enabled students to better visualize the ancient Roman world, such as our special tour at Ostia Antica. As one of our students wrote, “How better for us to rediscover a still partially intact town than with the TV star and archaeologist Darius Arya. He took us through some main attractions like the theater, shopping area, and bakery, but also showed us some hidden gems like an apartment building, a private home with plumbing, and a beautiful mosaic! Our trip through history showed us what a typical Roman town would’ve looked like, what they would’ve done on a typical day, and how much walking they did in one day!”

We were also able to see the Forum of Caesar and Augustus light shows and visit Nero’s Domus Aurea, which brought ancient Rome to life with projections and virtual reality. Our students are still talking about what they learned from both. One student wrote about the Forum of Caesar show, “It’s really cool to see where the Romans walked and lived but sometimes hard to imagine. That’s why the light show was so cool! Not only were we in Caesar’s forum, but we also got to see the forum how it was meant to be seen. We walked through the tunnels underneath…. We learned about how many times the neighborhood was destroyed to build, dig, or renovate. We walked into the forum from behind the Temple of Venus…. We kept walking past the fountain to learn about the shops. They were used by bankers to keep wills, weigh money, and more. We got to see what these shops looked like through the lights on the walls. Before the bankers, these alcoves were schools. We read their graffiti about the Aeneid and saw how kids loved and hated teachers. We also looked at the bathrooms, more columns, the Curia, and more. The lights really illuminated how much we know about Rome and how much there is to learn.”  

Using the virtual reality headsets in the Domus Aurea, we saw students connecting what we see today in Rome with what was there during the first century A.D. “The Domus Aurea [was] one of my favorite parts of the trip.... It not only gives you a sense of just how much people and resources the Romans had at their disposal to build a building like that but also how easily said building could… be buried underneath something else,” wrote one student. 

We are so grateful for this additional funding from CAMWS for our trip to Italy. Being able to have these experiences at archaeological sites aided our students’ understanding of the ancient world and helped them to see connections between ancient and modern cities.
Read the Student Reflections on the CAMWS website.
REPORTS FROM PREVIOUS
AWARD WINNERS
Summer Travel Awards
Semple Award
Eduardo García-Molina

“Parece que tienen alma las piedras de Grecia. Son modestas, y como amigas del que las ve. Se entran como amigas por el corazón. Parece que hablan.” 

“The stones of Greece appear to have souls. They are modest and are like friends to those who see them. They enter through the heart like friends. They appear to be speaking.”

(Martí, José, and Fryda Schultz de Mantovani. La Edad De Oro . Buenos Aires: Editorial Raigal, 1953.) 

Jose Martí’s words perfectly encapsulate, I believe, my initial reaction to Greece and the bevy of experiences I had during the six weeks of the ASCSA summer session. It is my hope that in this brief blurb I can sketch a rough picture of this trip, the people in my group, and, of course, my gratitude towards CAMWS for making this journey possible. 

Parroting Pausanias, we began our intrepid trek in Attika. Our coterie was composed of a motley crew of graduate students, undergraduates, and teachers under the direction of Matthew Sears. Bonds were immediately formed, smelted in the unrelenting Greek heat and forged by ambulatory toil. Such physical exertion, however, was quickly forgotten as we were led around the Agora by John Camp and through the National Museum by Olga Palagia. The initial climb to the Akropolis, never mired by the throng of tourists, affirmed my fascination with antiquity and the relevance of our field in a moment of realization that I thought was only possible in contrived movie plots.
Sitia
Plataia
Delphi
Dion
Metvoso
Epidauros
Our first major expedition was Crete. Heraklion was particularly notable not only for the wonderful museum, but also the food. In a scene that seemed to be a parody of the dinner sequence in Beauty and the Beast, we were treated to a Cretan culinary tour de force of fresh seafood. Our days were filled with visits to Minoan sites, competitive goat-counting during bus rides, and beaches the likes of which I have not witnessed outside of Puerto Rico. One standalone moment for me was a small side-excursion I had with another groupmate to the Gorge of the Dead, a surreal ravine both in terms of its natural beauty and the Minoan burial sites that dotted its steep faces. Another day, we went to Gortyn and saw its famed law code. That night, we settled in Matala and enjoyed the soulful twangs of “Hotel California” that concert speakers were blaring and bouncing off of the cave-dotted cliffs.

Once we were back in Attika, we were treated to a tour of the Akropolis museum spearheaded by Jenifer Neils and Alan Shapiro. The following day, we went to the fortress of Eleutherai to witness a peculiar Boeotian inscription that could only be seen during a narrow timeframe (à la Indiana Jones). In that same day trip, we went to Aigosthena and swam close to a tower originally constructed by Demetrios Poliorketes after visiting Eleusis and sitting within the Telesterion. Notably, I also experienced my first earthquake ever while doing laundry in Loring Hall.

Our second expedition was to the Peloponnese. I have never been more thankful for the invention of the automobile than when we faced the climb up the Akrokorinth. The view that the fortification afforded was awe-inspiring and it was clear to see why this location was one of the famed fetters of Greece that Philippos V pined for in his gamble to dominate the mainland. We proceeded to Korinthos proper where Christopher Pfaff and Ioulia Tzonou-Herbst showed us the current excavations. We eagerly took the opportunity to handle different votive offerings and curse tablets incised with acerbic, if not mildly comical, threats. We went to Nemea where, for me, the specter of Makedonian influence in mainland Greece loomed large in the background, soon to be usurped by Flamininus in his (in)famous proclamation. We climbed the slopes of Mt. Lykaion alongside David Romano and Mary Voyatzis, visited Olympia, and saw the criminally undersized statue of Polybios in Megalopolis. Our stalwart summer session strategos, Matthew Sears, led us through battlefields from the Peloponnesian War between breathtaking visits to Mycenean sites. The Peloponnesian trip ended with a wonderful night in Patras where a small group of us stopped for a drink in the middle of the road in an imaginary bar erected by a local mime.

The most gratifying leg of our journey for me, however, was the trip to Northern Greece. I gave a presentation on the battlefield of Plataia, witnessed the forlorn lion that serves as a tomb marker for the Sacred Band of Thebes, listened to Maria Liston give a fascinating presentation on battlefield wounds and osteological evidence, walked around Thermos like the Aitolians that Polybios loathed, and stopped at Actium (a highlight for me due to my fascination with Hellenistic navies). We visited the tomb of Philippos III Arrhidaios at Vergina and spent a night in Metsovo, a town nestled in the Pindos mountains.

We ended our adventure where we began, Attika. I went to the two best museums in Athens: The Epigraphic Museum (where Dr. Sears and I gushed over the Decree of Chremonides) and the Numismatic Museum with Lee Brice. A bittersweet party hosted by the American School and the lovely staff of Loring Hall was a delightful dénouement to the trip.

This has been a hard exercise for me. I still think I have not successfully conveyed not only the sheer scale of our wanderings throughout Greece and the diverse array of scholars that we had the pleasure of interacting with, but also the amazing group of friends that made the long bus rides and treks endurable and enjoyable. Once more I wish to express my gratitude to them, Matthew Sears, the ASCSA, and CAMWS for allowing me to explore the rich history of Greece for the first time in person.
Farewell Dinner
Eduardo García-Molina is a graduate student in the Classics department at the University of Chicago. His work focuses on the Seleukid Kingdom, Ancient Historiography, and the reception of Classics within Latin America.
Grant Award
Michelle Martinez
Thanks to the generous support of CAMWS’ Mary A. Grant award, I was able to attend the American Academy at Rome’s Classical Summer School for six weeks this past summer. This afforded me the great opportunity to study the development of the city of Rome over time with other high school Latin teachers and graduate students. I am especially glad that I was able to attend the session under the direction of Professor Gretchen Meyers because her knowledge of Etruscan archaeology was invaluable to me. The site visits to Veii, Tarquinia, and Cerveteri were beautiful and allowed me to take many pictures for my students to include when reading accounts of early Roman history. Our Etruscan site visits were complemented by a visit to the Villa Giulia museum where I got to see one of my favorite pieces of art in person: the temple pediment depicting the Tydeus episode which I had seen a photo of in a seminar on Statius but had never seen in person. In addition to Gretchen’s specialty in Etruscan archaeology, I was grateful to have access to the community and resources at the American Academy for the summer. Liana Brent’s talk about her walk of the entire Appian Way was a highlight of our time in the classroom and it was even more fun to walk part of the Appian Way with her as our guide. I also enjoyed the opportunity to try out VR headsets to experience the Rome Reborn project to see how to bring the city of Rome into the classroom itself. It was a privilege to work with the study collection under the direction of Valentina Follo, who helped us integrate material culture into lesson plans and lectures at both the pre-collegiate and undergraduate level, and Kathy Geffcken, who gave us an introduction to the numismatic collection of the Academy and a history of the collection. I am also grateful to our assistant, Sean Tandy, whose interest in Ostrogothic Italy really filled in a gap in my own knowledge of Late Antiquity and whose crash course in Latin epigraphy was invaluable when exploring the city of Rome on my own time. I especially appreciated my time at the Academy to write and edit lesson plans while having access to the city of Rome itself and the Academy’s wonderful library collection. Most of all, my trip to the Academy this summer afforded me an opportunity to connect with other scholars and teachers while visiting sites that many people aren’t able to see on a normal visit to Rome. I am delighted to bring my experiences in Italy to my students in my classroom who can experience how vibrant the city of Rome truly is.

Maximas gratias!

Michelle Martinez teaches Latin at Walnut Hills High School (Walnut Hills, OH).
Benario Award
Jessie Craft

In the winter of 2019, I applied for and won the Benario Award which funded my summer trip to participate in the Scholae Aestivae, organized and run by Roberto Carfagni of Schola Latina in Montella, Italy. Scholae Aestivae is a three week intensive Latin program in which I was only able to participate for one week. Each day is full of sessions on philosophy and ancient, Medieval, and Renaissance literature, all of which are taught in Latin (except the once a day ancient Greek language course) by some of the very best Latinists in the world. Although it may not seem like it, because they have learned to walk very lightly wherever they go, you are actually walking among giants. And while their names might not yet have reached your ears, their vast knowledge of the language, culture and history is second, perhaps, to none.
The school and the community which Scholae Aestivae creates supports your language learning process through full immersion. From the moment you rise from bed and greet your roommate in Latin and pose the ever important question who will shower first to the moment you return full of sleep but also new ideas and thoughts all swimming through your head in little Latin scaphis, you are constantly faced with situations in which Latin is the means of communication and negotiation. As you begin networking here and there with this person and that one, it quickly becomes clear that everyone is on the same mission: to learn Latin. This is not to say people come not knowing Latin; on the contrary, you must already have some basic proficiency before coming, but everyone is there to learn the Latin they have yet to acquire along their own personal journey thus far. 

Too, these same people quickly become your biggest allies in overcoming your own personal difficulties and struggles with the language. Everyone was slow to judge and quick to help if you needed or wanted it. Many of the participants were themselves teachers, so when something was not clear, they were equipped with many tried and true tools to scaffold the concept and help you understand. The instructors were also of the same caliber in terms of bridging the gap between difficult texts and comprehension, and they never shied away from participants’ search for deeper explanations or relevant thought experiments. So many excellent conversations were hashed out in class first from the natural curiosity of the questioner and then fueled by the shared curiosity of the instructor and fellow classmates. It was an unforgettable experience of true humanitas

The Scholae Aestivae did not just use the backdrop of the four walls of the beautiful De Marco Palace or the hotel Zia Carmela, but even those of the ancient ruins of Paestum, the location of one of our day trips. This was a special moment for me, in particular, since our primary focus was the study of the extant temples on the property and our guide led the entire tour in Latin. It seemed so fitting and harmonious to hear Latin, with the occasional recourse to ancient Greek, being used to describe the ancient monuments which once resounded with these very same languages some two millennia ago.

The results of my time there are palpable. Being pushed to use Latin in so many new ways and for such a long duration unleashed new abilities and a new confidence which I share daily with my students in class, the viewers of Magister Craft and the listeners of Legio XIII. I am deeply grateful to the committee of the Benario Award that chose me as its recipient, and sescentas gratias ago CAMWS for their continued support of educators through the many grants they make available for teachers at all levels. Gratias vobis iterum ago. Optime valeatis.

Jessie Craft teaches Latin at Ronald W. Reagan High School in Pfafftown, NC.
Excavation / Field School Awards
Rebecca Gaborek
Poggio Civitate Archaeological Field School
 
I am grateful for my time spent this summer contributing to the excavations at Poggio Civitate in Murlo, Italy. Along with a diverse, multidisciplinary team of excavators—from biologists to illustrators, first-year archaeology students to seasoned professionals—we broke ground on new trenches to help answer questions about the domestic lives of the non-elite inhabitants of the site. Poggio Civitate, famous for its enormous four-winged building and mysterious destruction, also reveals tantalizing information about the less flashy but equally important aspects of Etruscan daily life: manufacturing, industrial production, and non-elite dining, to name a few.
The view on the hike up to the excavation site, overlooking the rolling hills of Tuscany.
Gaborek visiting a nearby Etruscan site during one of her free weekends. Here is a chamber tomb from the Hellenistic Grotte necropolis at the Baratti and Populonia Archaeological Park.
I enjoyed shedding light on these activities while rotating between different excavation units. Each trench director offered a unique perspective on the material culture of Poggio Civitate and the importance of our work there. Their guidance quickly acclimated me to the physical demands and intellectual rewards of participating in archaeological fieldwork. Even a small piece of slag or a broken piece of terracotta could provide context for broader lines of inquiry. Although I left the excavation early due to a personal emergency, I was able to glean a solid foundation in Etruscan archaeological field methods and to gain a deep appreciation for the ancient peoples of the area.
 
Sifting through layers of stratigraphy and witnessing artifacts in situ — reading excavation reports and doing my part to help produce them — has allowed me to learn about antiquity in the most thorough way possible. Becoming a member of the Poggio Civitate project has not only enriched my archaeological skills in preparation for my future as a Ph.D. student of Classical archaeology, but has also helped me to conserve a rich historical legacy. The Greco-Roman world is my passion. More than anything else, I hope to share that passion with my peers by ensuring that the archaeological record—the best testament to that world—is properly excavated, documented, and displayed for the benefit of posterity.
Elise Poppen
Olynthos Project
 
The 2019 field season of the Olynthos Project took place between July 1st and August 9th. During this six-week season, the main goals were to finish certain rooms in House Bix6 on the North Hill of the city, to fill in the missing gaps in the field survey area, and to complete the stratigraphy trench on the South Hill. With the help of a CAMWS Excavation Award, I was able to participate in this final excavation season of the Olynthos Project and to experience personally the accomplishment of these goals. This award allowed me to benefit from the Project both in the ways I thought I would, and in ways I did not previously expect.
Poppen looking at a ceramic vessel to record it for secondary processing.
The conserved area of Olynthos at sunrise.
The CAMWS Excavation Award afforded me an opportunity to return to the Olynthos Project as a member of the ceramics team. In the past, we spent most of our time sorting all of the ceramic material from both the excavation and the survey. The team still spent a fair amount of time doing this task. This year, however, all members of the pottery team returned from last season. This collective experience meant that we were more efficient and accurate in our sorting of the material. Because of this, we had more time to think about the material critically and to go back to older excavation material. Before the season began, I would not have guessed what this extra time meant for the understanding of the excavation and the excavation material. For example, additional trenches were opened up in one room of the house that had been previously dug in 2015. After sorting the material from the 2019 excavation, we had time to go through the 2015 material from the same area. We made multiple cross joins of vessels across contexts from both seasons. This allowed us to give valuable feedback to the supervisor who was in charge of the trench, helped us think about depositional processes, and gave us a more complete picture of the contents left in the room.
 
In addition, we began to analyze more closely the ceramic assemblages present in each room and to think about what the material could possibly mean. This step meant that the ceramics team could move past the simple task of sorting and towards thinking critically about the ceramic remains that were coming from the house. This exercise provided me with valuable experience that I plan on applying to my Ph.D. dissertation. For my dissertation, I am researching the domestic architecture and ceramic assemblages of Roman Greece. Although Classical Olynthos does not fall under that category, being on a project that focuses on these topics gave me the chance to realize and consider some of the issues I may also encounter in my dissertation.
 
The last benefit of returning to Olynthos was that there was added effort this year for participants to present other material they have studied. Sometimes this was related to Olynthos or houses, and other times it was not. One example was a presentation regarding the microdebris analysis on a settlement located on the edge of the Assyrian Empire that was occupied between 800 to 600 BCE. Although not situated in the ancient Greek world, this research greatly informed our microdebris specialist’s experience, understanding, and interpretation of the microdebris remains at Olynthos. It was beneficial to learn about different perspectives, and to actively see how these could change and expand our understanding of the excavation.
 
Overall, it was a successful season for both the Olynthos Project and for myself. Without a CAMWS Excavation Award, I would not have been able to participate in this season. My presence on the Project meant that I could contribute to the understanding of the excavation and of the house as a whole, that I could join conversations about domestic archaeology that relate to both House Bix6 and my own dissertation research, and that I could learn about different perspectives that form people’s interpretations of archaeological material. Although this was my fourth year on the Project, I benefitted from another year of participating in ways that I could not have predicted. Because of this experience, I grew as an archaeologist and scholar, which was only possible with a CAMWS Excavation Award.
NEW IN THE CLASSICAL JOURNAL
The Classical Journal (ISSN 0009-8353) is published by the Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS), the largest regional classics association in the United States and Canada, and is now over a century old. All members of CAMWS receive the journal as a benefit of membership; non-member and library subscriptions are also available. CJ appears four times a year (October-November, December-January, February-March, April-May); each issue consists of 128 pages. It is included in JStore (00098353).

The following articles are contained in CJ 115.1
GEMSTONES, TEXTILES AND A PRINCESS: PRECIOUS COMMODITIES IN HELIODORUS’ AETHIOPICA

by Anna Lefteratou

Abstract: This article examines the cultural biographies of a selection of precious objects in Heliodorus’ Aethiopica, local and exotic, and shows how the transactions in which these are involved may illuminate the commodification of the heroine. The article evolves around the export-import metaphor used to discuss precious commodities and applies it on Chariclea and her tale.

CHILDREN AND BULLYING/HARASSMENT IN GRECO-ROMAN ANTIQUITY

by Christian Laes

Abstract: Fully recognizing all the possible limitations and even objections to a historical inquiry into bullying and harassment in Antiquity, this article tackles the subject by strictly limiting the situations to be studied. It only takes into account those instances in which children or adolescents are both the agents and the victims of bullying and harassing behavior. It only looks at the interaction between children of free status. First, I study children in a stage of life in which they were largely subjected to the authority of parents and other educators. After this, the focus is on young girls, whose coming of age put them in a peculiar situation regarding harassment. Finally, student life is given due attention. In conclusion, I point out how a careful consideration of these fragments not only informs us about aspects of everyday life of young people in antiquity, but also about ancient concepts of personhood.

NEC TIBI SUFFICIAT TRANSMISSAE GLORIA VITAE OTIUM AND AMBITION FROM STATIUS TO ENNODIUS

by Neil W. Bernstein

Abstract: Statius’ Silvae are part of a lengthy Roman literary tradition of justifying temporary or permanent retirement from public affairs in favor of the productive use of otium. Praiseworthy uses of otium typically involved liberal studies such as philosophy and poetic composition, pursued either during a temporary period of rest from public duties, or as the occupation of permanent retirement. This paper examines how Claudian and Sidonius adapted some aspects of Statius’ otium motifs in order to praise addressees who faced very different social and political circumstances from the Flavian era. Achilles’ seclusions at Scyros and Troy provide these poets with a mythological narrative of withdrawal and return. The paper concludes with discussion of Ennodius’ adaptation of Statius’ motifs in the unexpected context of an epithalamium

THE SUBJECTS OF SLAVERY IN 19TH-CENTURY AMERICAN LATIN SCHOOLBOOKS

by Denise Eileen McCoskey

Abstract: A new study by the Southern Poverty Law Center has argued that American education is failing in its ability to teach “hard history,” and especially the history of American slavery, to today’s students. In similar ways, Erik Robinson has recently highlighted the difficulty that high school Latin teachers often face teaching certain “horrors” of the ancient world like slavery in their classrooms. Both Robinson and the SPLC call particular attention to the role of textbooks in such failings. In this article I want to share some results of a survey I conducted on the representation of slavery in American Latin schoolbooks from the 19th century. I use these textbooks, and in particular a close reading of student exercises contained within them, to shed light on the problematic ways slavery is presented in today’s books. While I certainly do not seek to “praise” or rationalize the often brutal depictions of slavery in 19th-century schoolbooks, I believe they show a portrayal of slavery that is revealing in its frankness, one that, even through a lens of fear and paranoia, acknowledges the agency and experience of the slave. Such a contrast allows us to “de-naturalize” the ways that slavery is shown in many current Latin textbooks, to understand that the tendency of today’s textbooks to conceal the brutality of slavery behind a bland inoffensiveness (to whom?) is every bit as ideological in its operations and outcomes as grappling with its darkness.
NEW IN TEACHING CLASSICAL LANGUAGES
Teaching Classical Languages ( TCL) is the peer-reviewed, online journal dedicated to exploring how we teach (and how we learn) Greek and Latin.
New Submissions Sought
 
TCL seeks to diversify the types of articles it considers for publication. It will now consider short features, including (but not limited to): opinion columns, interviews, spotlights, infographics, etc. Inquiries and submissions may be directed to Yasuko Taoka, editor, at tcleditor@camws.org.
CAMWS NEWS AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
JPASS
JStore offers CAMWS members a 50% discount on a JPASS providing unlimited access to the JStor library. Go to

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CAMWS Podcasts

At its 2019 meeting in Lincoln, the CAMWS Executive Committee approved a new initiative of the History Committee to create an open library of podcasts on CAMWS topics. The plan is to produce about twelve podcasts per year, based on a mixture of pre-recorded content (e.g., CAMWSCorps interviews, ovationes, presidential addresses) and live interviews with a variety of CAMWS members (e.g., award-winners, officers, committee chairs, presenters) in order to advertise upcoming meetings, to invite applications for awards and scholarships, to encourage discussion of important issues, to commemorate the lives of deceased members of the Association.

For this purpose the Executive Committee has approved the creation of a CAMWS podcaster position. A job description for this position is posted at https://camws.org/podcaster. The podcaster serves ex-officio as a member of the History Committee.

We are pleased to welcome Sam Kindick of the University of Colorado Boulder as CAMWS Podcaster. Sam is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Classics, where he works on Latin epic and elegiac poetry, especially the works of Ovid. Before coming to CU, he earned MAs in both Classics (Florida State University) and Medieval History (Saint Louis University). On campus he’s served as the President of the Classics Graduate Colloquium, as a Lead Instructor for the Graduate Teacher Program and as the Lead Student Technology Consultant.

CAMWS Podcasts can be found here: https://camws.org/podcast. On this page several podcasts have already been posted. The earliest is a CAMWSCorps interview of the late Consularis James Ruebel of Ball State University by graduate student Krishni Burns of the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign This podcast was created by Scott Lepisto at Grand Valley State University. In the second CAMWSCorps podcast, graduate student Sarah Titus of the University of Washigton interviews Eleanor Winsor Leach of Indiana University, who passed away in 2018. In this podcast Leach’s former students, Davina McClain and Zoe Barnett discuss their memories of her. This podcast was created by Sam Kindick. In the most recent podcast, CAMWS podcaster Sam Kindick interviews  Andrew C. Johnston of Yale University as a recipient of a  2019 CAMWS First Book Prize for The Sons of Remus: Identity in Roman Gaul and Spain (Harvard University Press, 2017) at the 115th CAMWS meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska. Sam plans, in the near future, to post a podcast on Tom Keeline of Washington University of St. Louis (the other 2019 First Book Award book winner). He also plans episodes on Lauri Reitzammer, who won the college teaching award, and on Birmingham and the Samford Classics Department in anticipation of the 2020 meeting.
CAMWS to Receive Bequest from Rudolph Masciantonio

CAMWS has recently learned that it is one of the beneficiaries of a non-endowed fund established with the Philadelphia Foundation by Dr. Rudolph Masciantonio of Phlladelphia in 2008. CAMWS is one of fifteen classical organizations which will share equally in this fund worth just under $8 million. Dr. Masciantonio, who taught Latin in the Philadelphia Public Schools, died on September 23, 2016. Dr. Masciantonio published extensively on the value of learning Latin. His publications include: The Classical Greek Program in the School District of Philadelphia (Philadelphia: School District of Philadelphia, 1968); How the Romans Lived and Spoke: A Humanistic Approach to Latin for Children in the 5th Grade: Romani viventes et dicentes (Philadelphia: School District of Philadelphia, 1968, 3rd ed., 1972); Voces de Olympo: Echoes from Mount Olympus: A Humanistic Approach to Latin for Children in the Sixth Grade (Philadelphia: School District of Philadelphia, 1970); Latin Materials for the Inner-City Public School (Oxford, OH: American Classical League, n.d.); A White Paper on Latin and the Classics for Urban Schools (Oxford, OH: American Classical League, n.d.);  Latin: The Key to English Vocabulary a Gamebook on English Derivatives and Cognates to accompany Voces de Olympo (Philadelphia: School District of Philadelphia, 1976); Tangible Benefits of the Study of Latin: A Review of Research (Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse on Languages and Linguistics, 1977); The Ancient Greeks Speak to Us: A New Humanistic Approach to Classical Greek and Greek Culture for Secondary Schools (Philadelphia: School District of Philadelphia, 1978); Star Trek with Numbers (Oxford, OH: American Classical League, 1980); Latin: The Language of the Health Sciences (Oxford, OH: American Classical League, 1992); Legal Latin (Oxford, OH: American Classical League, n.d.); Build your English Word Power with Latin Numbers (Wauconda, IL: Bolchazy-Carducci, 1997).

For his obituary, see https://camws.org/masciantonio.
Call for Abstracts for Undergraduate
Poster Presentations at CAMWS 202

CAMWS President Anne Groton and the Program Committee for the 116th CAMWS meeting in Birmingham, Alabama, announce a call for abstracts for undergraduate poster presentations at CAMWS 2020. Submissions may be on any topic related to the ancient world. Students whose abstracts are accepted by the committee are expected to present their posters at a session on Friday morning, March 27, 2020 at the Hyatt Regency Birmingham — The Wynfrey Hotel. A monetary prize will be awarded to the undergraduate who gives the best presentation of an outstanding poster. The winner of this prize will be announced at the Annual CAMWS Business Meeting on Saturday, March 28, 2020.

Use this application form to submit an abstract for the poster session by 11:59 pm on Wednesday, January 15, 2020. All applicants must be current members of CAMWS at the time of application and receive the endorsement of a professor at their institution. Details about the size and format of the posters will be provided in acceptance notices, but these Natural Sciences Undergraduate Research Conference guidelines for poster preparation are a good place to start.

Please note that CAMWS has some limited funds available to support undergraduate travel to the conference. For more information, see James Ruebel Undergraduate Travel Award. Applications for this award are due on January 30.
Task Force on the CAMWS Annual Meeting

The Executive Committee approved the appointment of a task force charged with evaluating two possible models for the CAMWS Annual Meeting: either holding all sessions and events in a hotel, or holding some of them on the campus of a sponsoring institution. The task force should submit a report, along with recommendations, to the Executive Committee by December 31, 2019.

  • Peter E. Knox (Eric and Jane Nord Family Professor, Director of the Baker-Nord Center for the Humanities, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH) – CAMWS Consularis, Chair
  • Brian M. Duvick (Associate Professor of History, University of Colorado, Colorado Springs, CO) – Member of CAMWS History Committee
  • Angela L. Pitts (Professor of Classics, University of Mary Washington, Fredericksburg, VA) – Member of CAMWS Diversity & Inclusion Committee
  • Martin P. Shedd (Murphy Visiting Fellow in Classics, Hendrix College, Conway, AR) – Member of CAMWS Development Committee
  • Holly M. Sypniewski (Professor of Greek & Roman Studies, Millsaps College, Jackson, MS) – Member of CAMWS Membership Committee
  • T. Davina McClain (Professor of Classics, Louisiana Scholars’ College at Northwestern State University, Natchitoches, LA) – CAMWS Secretary-Treasurer Elect, non-voting ex-officio member
FEIC General Assembly 2019: Synopsis

Alden Smith, CAMWS Delegate to FIEC
 
The General Assembly of the Fédération internationale des associations des études classiques (FIEC) was held in coordination with the meeting of Britain’s Classical Association from July 4-8, 2019 in London. FIEC is the international umbrella classical association that unites the various different professional associations such as SCS and CAMWS. This report offers a brief synopsis of the formal assembly meeting. 
 
In that gathering, after the normal procedural items, new members were admitted to FIEC, including the American Classical League. In addition, out-going long-serving and steadfast president Franco Montanari made some very warm remarks about the value of FIEC and the classics as a discipline, and his years of service to both. The outgoing general secretary, Paul Schubert also made important remarks about the role of FIEC in the discipline as the principal uniting body that helps to facilitate badly needed interaction between various branches of classics. It is, moreover, a watchdog organization, aiding wherever possible to preserve the study of classics.
 
After these remarks and various other business items, including strong reports on the status of L’Année Philologique and on the progress of the TLL (Letters ‘R’ and ‘N’ are in progress), a particularly important item emerged: the inclusion of Latin and Greek on the UNESCO Cultural Heritage List; it passed unanimously, and a separate announcement has been issued by CAMWS about this, available on our website.

Elections were also held: the incoming president will be Gunhiud Vidén (Sweden) and the secretary general, Sabine Huebner (Switzerland); the new treasurer will be Valérie Fromentin (France). President Vidén made some final remarks expressing her own heartfelt thanks to Professors Montanari and Schubert. 
 
In sum, FIEC’s importance to classics and the relevance of CAMWS’ participation as a member of FIEC cannot be overstated. In that regard, the level of cross-cultural cooperation evidenced by all the delegates was, to my mind, one of the tenderest and richest aspects of the FIEC meeting—our discipline at its best. The next FIEC general assembly will be in 2022 in Mexico City at the invitation of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
CAMWS Endorsement of FEIC Resolution Regarding UNESCO List of Intangible Cultural Heritage
 
On July 17, 2019 the CAMWS Executive Committee voted to endorse the FIEC Resolution re UNESCO List of Intangible Cultural Heritage. The Italian Senate and the Spanish Parliament have also recently approved resolutions asking their respective governments to request from UNESCO to claim Ancient Greek and Latin as part of the World Heritage ( ich.unesco.org/en/lists).
CAMWS Social Media Update
 
CAMWS is pleased to announce the creation of a new Instagram account, designed to feature more images and videos related to our activities and to interact with the visual content of our members. With this new account comes new social media management.

We are pleased to welcome E.L. Meszaros as the incoming Social Media Director. E.L. is a graduate student in the History of the Exact Sciences in Antiquity at Brown University, with M.A.s in Social Science from the University of Chicago and Linguistics from Eastern Michigan University and a B.A. in Classical Languages from the College of Wooster.

E.L. has been a member of CAMWS since 2016 and has been an active member of the CAMWS Graduate Student Issues Committee since 2017. In addition to her GSIC service, E.L. is active in online communities, working on public scholarship through her writing with venues like the Journal of the History of Ideas blog, Contingent, Lady Science, and Eidolon.

E.L. is excited to take over management of the CAMWS Facebook and Twitter accounts, in addition to the new Instagram account. Comments and questions can be addressed to her at media@camws.org or through direct messaging of any social media account.
Workshops and Field Schools
CAMWS Members
Save 25%
Oxford University Press is offering a 25% discount on its entire Classics list to all CAMWS members. Go to
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Available in the U.S. and Canada only.
CAMWS members have full access to the Loeb Classical Library On-Line.
Go to https://cj.camws.org/loeb. (password protected)
NEWS FROM OUR
INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERS
University of Virginia Announces Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship
As part of its commitment to diversifying the graduate student body and the field more generally, the Department of Classics at the University of Virginia seeks to support students from groups that are underrepresented in our discipline and who have not yet received sufficient training and research experience to prepare them for admission to doctoral programs. The Graduate School of Arts & Sciences at the University of Virginia is accepting applications to join the first cohort of Bridge to the Doctorate Fellows for enrollment in Fall 2020. The Bridge Fellowship is a fully funded two-year program assisting gifted and hard-working students in Classics to acquire research and language skills needed to pursue a Ph.D. in Classics. The Fellowship is geared exclusively to assist the professional and personal development of the Fellow, and as such it comes without teaching responsibilities. Fellows will receive $24,000 per year in living support and full payment of their tuition, and fees, and single-person coverage in the University’s student health insurance plan for a period of two years.

Our Bridge program provides two full years of fellowship support without teaching responsibilities for students to enroll in a combination of courses, guided research opportunities and UVA’s intensive graduate student professional development curriculum known as “Ph.D. Plus.” Each Bridge fellow will work individually with faculty to develop a customized academic plan that will identify opportunities for additional disciplinary training, enable them to cultivate writing and research skills specific to their chosen field of expertise, and develop a competitive portfolio for applying to doctoral programs. Predicated on a student’s strong and sustained performance during the Bridge Fellowship, the Department of Classics is committed either to admitting qualified Fellows directly into the Ph.D. program following the successful completion of the Fellowship or to assist Fellows with their applications to other Ph.D. programs. The M.A. may be awarded upon the successful completion of the Departmental M.A. requirements ( http://classics.as.virginia.edu/requirements-exams-reading-lists).
 
We encourage individuals from diverse ethnic groups, economically disadvantaged / low-income backgrounds, and first-generation college students to apply. Applications are accepted at: http://graduate.as.virginia.edu/bridge-doctorate.

Prerequisites and Criteria

Applicants for the Bridge Fellowship should have completed two years of college level training in one of the ancient languages (Latin or Greek), and preferably one year in the other. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

In case of queries and for more information about the Bridge Fellowship in Classics, please contact: Coulter George ( chg4n@virginia.edu).
Baylor Postbac Program
For additional information and application instructions visit
NOTICES FROM OTHER CLASSICAL ORGANIZATIONS
The American School of Classical Studies at Athens was founded in 1881 to provide American graduate students and scholars a base for their studies in the history and civilization of the Greek world. Today it is still a teaching institution, providing graduate students a unique opportunity to study firsthand the sites and monuments of Greece. The School is also a superb resource for students and senior scholars pursuing research in many fields ranging from prehistoric to modern Greece, thanks to its internationally renowned libraries, the Blegen, focusing on all aspects of Greece from its earliest prehistory to late antiquity, and the Gennadius, which concentrates on the medieval to modern Greek world, as well as the Malcolm H. Wiener Laboratory for Archaeological Sciences.

See the CAMWS website for more a concise list of 2020-21 Programs and Fellowships. You can also explore further at https://www.ascsa.edu.gr/ programs.
Humanities for All
Dear colleagues,

In summer 2018, the National Humanities Alliance launched Humanities for All, with the support of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to document and promote publicly engaged humanities research, teaching, preservation, and programming in U.S. higher education. The initiative brings together over 1,500 examples, showcasing the range of humanities work conducted with and for communities by scholars at universities, colleges, and scholarly societies across the United States.

To keep pace with the growth and increasing diversity of publicly engaged work across the humanities, we are writing to invite recommendations of work to include in the Humanities for All website.

If you are aware of publicly engaged research, teaching, preservation, or programming that should be included in Humanities for All, we would be grateful if you submitted its information at:


We thank you in advance for joining us in this important work of supporting public engagement in the humanities.

Best regards,

Daniel Fisher, Ph.D.
Project Director, Humanities for All
National Humanities Alliance
Programs Overview

The Paideia Institute currently operates six independent programs in Europe. In each program participants visit the ancient world’s most inspiring historical settings to read the ancient texts that describe them.

Read more
www.paideiainstitute.org
Living Latin and Greek in New York City is an annual two-day conference hosted jointly by The Paideia Institute and the Fordham University Department of Classics. It features papers delivered in Latin and Ancient Greek as well as small breakout sessions where participants practice speaking Ancient Greek and Latin under the guidance of expert instructors. Professional development credit is available. The theme of the next conference, scheduled for February 15-16, 2020 on the Fordham University campus, is “Neglected Voices.” Which people or groups of people have been neglected, disregarded, or socially excluded throughout the history of Greco-Latinity? What do we know about them, and how do we know what we know? How does exploring their contributions help paint a fuller picture of the Ancient Greek- and Latin-speaking past? For more information see:

Would you like to travel abroad? And have help paying for it?

The Vergilian Society is offering exciting study tours in summer 2020 including Greeks and Romans on the Bay of Naples; Roman Switzerland; Drawing and Watercolor in the Italian Landscape; Roman Otium on the Bay of Naples: A Study Tour for Teachers. Malta is also on offer for winter 2020-21. These programs are specifically designed to benefit and appeal to teachers and students at all levels by providing them the opportunity to experience a rich variety of ancient sites to support their own understanding and teaching of the ancient world. See the full descriptions on the Vergilian Society website at:


Almost $100,000 in scholarship money is also available:


Planning to travel to Italy with your own students? The Vergilian Society can help! We have funds to offset the cost of teacher and student group travel as well as experienced directors to help plan your trip:

JOB POSTINGS
Job Opportunities in Paideia Summer Programs

The Paideia Institute is currently accepting applications for teachers, logistical directors, and teaching fellows in its four summer programs:

  • Living Latin in Rome
  • Living Latin in Rome (High School)
  • Living Greek in Greece
  • Living Greek in Greece (High School) 

We are seeking dynamic and highly motivated classicists to join our summer programs team and help us inspire students to form close personal relationships with the classics through extraordinary learning experiences. 

If you’re interested in working with talented students and faculty on site in Rome and Greece, teaching and speaking Latin and ancient Greek in an immersive classroom environment, we want to hear from you! For more information about each position and application instructions, please visit our website or click the link below.

Vale,

The Paideia Institute
2021 DIRECTORS OF THE ASCSA SUMMER PROGRAMS (GERTRUDE SMITH PROFESSORS)

Summer Session (traditional six-week course): One Position
Summer Seminars (18-day courses): Two Positions

SIX-WEEK Traditional ASCSA SUMMER SESSION

Term: Summer 2021
Deadline: January 31, 2020

Eligibility: Former membership in the School and at least two years of teaching in a post-secondary educational institution. Qualified applicants in all areas of classical studies, including history, art history, languages, epigraphy, and archaeology, are encouraged to apply. Some knowledge of modern Greek, stamina, good health, and a sense of humor.

Description: See more information about the ASCSA Summer Sessions: http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/programs/Summer.

Duties: Plan the itinerary of the session/seminar, in consultation with the staff in Athens, at least six months prior to the session; collaborate with the Committee on the Summer Sessions in the selection of participants; correspond with participants concerning travel, equipment, academic requirements, etc.; supervise all aspects of the program in Greece, including teaching, coordinating with on-site expert lecturers, keeping a detailed log of the sessions, managing incidental expenses, and submitting a report to the Director.

Compensation: Stipend of $9,064, plus travel and expenses, housing for the Summer Session leader(s) for eight weeks in total as available June 1 to August 15.  See the attached policy.

Application: An online application consisting of a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, and three letters of support. Recommendations are due on the same date as the deadline for applications. Once an online application is submitted, recommenders will be sent an automated email with instructions about how to submit their letters of recommendation. Recommenders will be asked to upload their letters via the online application system, Submittable. It is also acceptable for recommenders to submit letters directly to this email address: application@ascsa.org. It is preferable for recommenders to submit their letters following the instructions in the automated email.

The appointments will be announced by March 29.

ASCSA SUMMER SEMINARS

Term: Summer 2021
Deadline: January 31, 2020

Eligibility: Former membership in the School and at least two years of teaching in a post-secondary educational institution. Qualified applicants in all areas of classical studies, including history, art history, languages, epigraphy, and archaeology, are encouraged to apply. Some knowledge of modern Greek, stamina, good health, and a sense of humor.

Description: The theme of the18-day field seminars are open. Possible topics include: a “major sites” program (Athens, with short trips to Delphi, the Argolid, or other regions or sites); Mycenaean Greece; ancient athletics; pottery; sculpture; epigraphy; religious, public, and domestic architecture; ancient literature; numismatics; topography of myth; historical geography; the ancient economy; Roman Greece; Byzantine Greece; Ottoman Greece; the population exchange between Greece and Turkey; modern folklore; etc.

Residence in Loring Hall is available, though not required, for program participants during the first and third week of the seminar. The itinerary, therefore, must include at least one week of travel in the middle of the seminar. Two summer seminars are offered, one in June and one in July. For more information about the ASCSA Summer Seminars, see: http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/programs/summer-seminars.

Duties: Plan an 18-day seminar, in consultation with the staff in Athens, at least six months prior to the session; collaborate with the Committee on the Summer Sessions in the selection of participants; correspond with participants concerning travel, equipment, academic requirements, etc.; supervise all aspects of the program, including teaching, coordinating with on-site expert lecturers, keeping a detailed log of the sessions, managing incidental expenses, and submitting a report to the Director.

Compensation: Stipend of $5,000, plus travel and expenses, housing for four weeks in total including the dates of the seminar. See the attached policy.

Application: An online application consisting of a cover letter discusses your qualifications; a curriculum vitae; a description of the seminar and a preliminary 18-day itinerary indicating which sites would be visited and how much time would ideally be spent in and out of Athens; and three letters of support. Recommendations are due on the same date as the deadline for applications. Once an online application is submitted, recommenders will be sent an automated email with instructions about how to submit their letters of recommendation. Recommenders will be asked to upload their letters via the online application system, Submittable. It is also acceptable for recommenders to submit letters directly to this email address: application@ascsa.org. It is preferable for recommenders to submit their letters following the instructions in the automated email.

The appointments will be announced by March 29.

For additional information or inquiries, contact: Professors Jorge Bravo (University of Maryland) and Elizabeth Baltes (Coastal Carolina University), Chairs of the Committee on the Summer Sessions at ssapplication@ascsa.org.

ASCSA Internships in Non-Profit Management

Short term unpaid internships are available throughout the year in the School’s U.S. office in Princeton, NJ. Internships will focus on non-profit administration and fundraising, and interns will assist staff with the various duties of managing an overseas educational and research center.

Internship Description: Hands-on experience in learning business practices for an education-based not for profit. Organization and daily communication with applicants, members, and committees using virtual workspaces, online applications, and surveys. Management and promotion of academic and fellowship programs. Website programming. Database maintenance of constituency records. Research and reporting.

Qualifications: The School is seeking advanced undergraduates or recent graduates with a major or degree in a field related to the School’s academic areas, such as classics, ancient history, art history, archaeology, Modern Greek studies, marketing or communications. An interest in pursuing a career in non-profit administration, development or marketing is desirable. Excellent communications skills, both written and oral, are required.

Term: Available for a School term (fall, winter or spring), summer, or full year.

Application Procedure: Please send resume and cover letter to American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 6-8 Charlton Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 or email to ascsa@ascsa.org with “Internship Application” in the subject line.
School of St. Mary in Lake Forest, IL

The School of St. Mary in Lake Forest, Illinois, is searching for a 4th-8th grade Latin Teacher for the second semester of this year and for the coming year. They are committed to continuing their program and are currently offering it via an online platform. If interested, please email cmural@g125.org for contact info.
William Jewell College
Instructor or Non-Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of Spanish and Latin

The Department of Languages invites applications for an Instructor or Non-Tenure-Track Assistant Professor of Spanish and Latin. This is a full-time, non-tenure-track position beginning August 2020, with rank depending on qualifications. A Ph.D. in Spanish or a closely related field, area of specialization open, is preferred with the ideal candidate qualified to teach at all levels in the Spanish program and elementary and intermediate courses in classical Latin. The teaching load is 3/3, with courses that are four credits each. The position likely includes teaching three Spanish courses and three Latin courses per academic year. Preference will be given to applicants with strong leadership skills, the ability to teach a range of undergraduate language courses, and the desire to integrate fully into the life of a liberal arts college.

Review of applicants will begin Nov. 25, 2019 and continue until position is filled. More information about the position and application procedures can be found on the College’s website, www.jewell.edu/jobs. William Jewell College is an equal opportunity employer.
HONORING LATIN TEACHERS
The following Latin teachers (listed alphabetically) are being honored by the donor to the CAMWS Latin Teacher Training Initiative indicated in parentheses. Please note that any contributor of $100 or more to the Initiative is invited to honor a teacher.

  • Frances L. Baird of the Friends School in Wilmington DE (Ward Briggs)
  • Mary Casson of the Radford School in El Paso TX (Patrick Abel)
  • Carolyn Dewald of Bard College NY (Ruth Scodel)
  • Generosa Dunn of the University of Chicago Lab School in Chicago IL (Owen Cramer)
  • Lucile Davis Ford of Amarillo High School TX (Susan Wiltshire)
  • Will Freiert of Gustavus Adolphus College MN (John Miller
  • ​​​Ruth Grace of Saddle River Country Day School NJ (Peter Knox)
  • Alan N. Houghton of Pine Point School, in Stonington CT (Mary T. Boatwright)
  • Ronald J. Karrenbauer of the John F. Kennedy High School in Warren OH (James May)
  • Theresa M. Kleinheinz of Madison West High School WI (Theodore A. Tarkow)
  • Eleanor Little of Dubuque Senior High School in Dubuque, Iowa (James Sandrock)
  • David E. Oberlin of Washington H.S. in Massillon OH (Niall W. Slater)
  • Marian W. Stocker of St. Catherine’s School in Richmond VA (Jon Mikalson)
  • Gerald J. Sullivan of St. Paul’s School in Concord NH (David Tandy)
  • Michael Wigodsky of Stanford University CA (Marilyn Skinner)
  • Steven Wright of Montwood H.S. in El Paso TX (Patrick Abel)
  • William Ziobro of The College of the Holy Cross in Worcester MA, (Thomas J. Sienkewicz)
2019-20 CAMWS COMMITTEE MEMBERS
STANDING COMMITTEES
Executive Committee
The chair of this committee can be reached at president@camws.org.
The Executive Committee can be reached at executivecommittee@camws.org.


Committee for the Promotion of Latin
The chair of this committee can be reached at cpl@camws.org.
The CPL Committee can be reached at cplcommittee@camws.org.


  • Garrett A. Jacobsen, Denison University (OH), 2022 (Chair)
  • Alison M. Keith, University of Toronto (ON), 2020
  • David B. Wharton, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2021
  • Robin C. Anderson, Phoenix Country Day School (AZ), 2021
  • Lynn A. LiCalsi, Farview High School (CO), 2021
  • Robert H. Simmons, Monmouth College (IL), 2022
Development Committee
The chair of this committee can be reached at development@camws.org.
The Development Committee can be reached at developmentcommittee@camws.org.


  • Andromache Karanika, University of California at Irvine, 2021 (Chair)
  • Marie-Claire A. Beaulieu, Tufts University (MA), 2020
  • Angeline C. Chiu, University of Vermont, 2021
  • Martin P. Shedd, Hendrix College (AR), 2022
  • Christine G. Perkell, Emory University (GA), 2022
  • James V. Lowe,The John Burroughs School (MO), 2021
  • Anne H. Groton, St. Olaf College (MN), President, ex officio
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer, ex officio
Finance Committee
The chair of this committee can be reached at finance@camws.org.
The Finance Committee can be reached at financecommittee@camws.org.


  • J. Andrew Foster, Fordham University (NY), 2021 (Chair)
  • Marilyn B. Skinner, University of Arizona, 2020
  • David W. Tandy, University of Leeds (UK), 2021
  • Mark W. Padilla, Christopher Newport University (VA), 2022
  • Julia D. Hejduk, Baylor University (TX), 2022
  • Eleni H. Manolaraki, University of South Florida, 2022
  • Anne H. Groton, St. Olaf College (MN), President, ex officio
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer, ex officio
Membership Committee
The chair of this committee can be reached at membership@camws.org.
The Membership Committee can be reached at membershipcommittee@camws.org.


  • Roger T. Macfarlane, Brigham Young University (UT), 2021 (Chair)
  • Holly M. Sypniewski, Millsaps College (MS), 2020
  • Arum Park, University of Arizona, 2020
  • Jessica R. Blum-Sorensen, University of San Francisco (CA), 2021
  • Cecilia M. Peek, Brigham Young University (UT), 2021
  • Debra A. Trusty, University of Iowa, 2022
  • Anne H. Groton, St. Olaf College (MN), President, ex officio
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer, ex officio
Merit Committee
The chair of this committee can be reached at merit@camws.org.
The Merit Committee can be reached at meritcommittee@camws.org.


  • David J. White, Baylor University (TX), 2021 (Chair, Orator)
  • David M. Pollio, Christopher Newport University (VA), 2020
  • Robert W. Cape, Jr., Austin College (TX), 2020
  • Nicoletta Villa-Sella, The Linsly School (WV), 2021
  • Jenny Strauss Clay, University of Virginia, 2021
  • Michele Valerie Ronnick, Wayne State University (MI), 2021
  • Philip V. Barnes, John Burroughs School (MO), 2022
  • Susan O. Shapiro, Utah State University, 2022
Nominating Committee
The chair of this committee can be reached at nominating@camws.org.
The Nominating Committee can be reached at nominatingcommittee@camws.org.


  • Andrew T. Faulkner, University of Waterloo (ON), Immediate Past President (Chair, ex officio)
  • Anise K. Strong, Western Michigan University, 2020
  • Monica S. Cyrino, University of New Mexico, 2020
  • Nandini B. Pandey, University of Wisconsin, 2021
  • Jonathan P. Zarecki, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 2021
  • Angeliki Tzanetou, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2022
  • Steven L. Tuck, Miami University (OH), 2022
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer, ex officio
Program Committee
The chair of this committee can be reached at president@camws.org.
The Program Committee can be reached at programcommittee@camws.org.


  • Anne H. Groton, St. Olaf College (MN), President (Chair, ex officio)
  • Andrew T. Faulkner, University of Waterloo (ON), Past President, ex officio
  • David J. Schenker, University of Missouri, President Elect, ex officio
  • Zoe Stamatopoulou, Washington University in St. Louis (MO), 2020
  • Ellen Greene, University of Oklahoma, 2020
  • Jennifer L. Ferriss-Hill, University of Miami (FL), 2021
  • Keely K. Lake, Wayne State University (MI), 2021
  • Vassiliki Panoussi, William & Mary (VA), 2022
  • Timothy R. Wutrich, Case Western Reserve University (OH), 2022
Publications Sucommittee of the Executive Committee
Nota bene: All members of this subcommittee serve ex officio.
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at president@camws.org.
The Publications Subcommittee can be reached at publicationscommittee@camws.org.


  • Anne H. Groton, St. Olaf College (MN), President (Chair)
  • Andrew T. Faulkner, University of Waterloo (ON), Immediate Past President
  • Antonios C. Augoustakis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Editor, The Classical Journal
  • Sergio Yona, University of Missouri, Editor, Classical Journal Online, Book Review Editor, The Classical Journal
  • Yasuko Taoka, Wayne State College (NE), Editor, Teaching Classical Languages
  • Timothy S. Heckenlively, Baylor University (TX), Editor, CAMWS Newsletter
  • Bartolo A. Natoli, Randolph-Macon College (VA), Editor, CJ Forum
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary-Treasurer
Resolutions Committee
The chair of this committee can be reached at resolutions@camws.org.
The Resolutions Committee can be reached at resolutionscommittee@camws.org.


  • Anatole Mori, University of Missouri, 2020 (Chair)
  • Luke A. Gorton, University of New Mexico, 2020
  • McKenzie Lewis, University of Waterloo (ON), 2021
  • Meredith D. Prince, Auburn University (AL), 2021
  • Athanasia L. Worley, Shawnee Mission East High School (KS), 2022
  • Mark Thorne, Luther College (IA), 2022
Steering Committee on Awards and Scholarships
The chairs of nine subcommittees serve ex officio.
The chair of this committee can be reached at steering@camws.org.
The Steering Committee can be reached at steeringcommittee@camws.org.


  • Lorenzo F. Garcia, Jr., University of New Mexico, 2021 (Chair)
  • Cynthia K. White, University of Arizona, Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award
  • Benjamin M. Wolkow, University of Georgia, CAMWS College Greek Exam
  • Victor M. Martinez, University of Arizona, CAMWS Excavation/Field School Awards
  • Jennifer L. Larson, Kent State University (OH), CAMWS First Book Award
  • Kristen A. Ehrhardt, John Carroll University (OH), CAMWS Undergraduate Awards
  • Margaret W. Musgrove, University of Central Oklahoma, School Awards
  • Nick L. Fletcher, The Hawken School (OH), School Awards
  • Ruth R. Caston, University of Michigan, Stewart Training/Travel Awards
  • Ariana E. Traill, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Summer Travel Grants (Semple, Grant, Benario Awards)
  • Laury A. Ward, Hillsdale College (MI), Teaching Awards (Kraft and CAMWS)
  • Thomas J. Sienkewicz, Monmouth College (IL), Secretary, Treasurer, ex officio
STEERING COMMITTEE SUB-COMMITTEES FOR AWARDS AND SCHOLARSHIPS
Subcommittee on the Ladislaus J. Bolchazy Book Award
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at pedagogyaward@camws.org.
The Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Subcommittee can be reached at pedagogyawardcommittee@camws.org.


  • Cynthia White, University of Arizona, 2022 (Chair)
  • Sydnor Roy,Texas Tech University, 2020
  • Teresa R. Ramsby, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 2020
  • Timothy F. Winters, Austin Peay University (TN), 2021
  • Mary Hamil Gilbert, Birmingham Southern College (AL), 2021
  • Clifford A. Robinson, University of the Sciences (PA), 2022
Subcommittee on the CAMWS College Greek Exam
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at cge@camws.org.
The Subcommittee of the CAMWS College Greek Exam can be reached at cgecommittee@camws.org.

Subcommittee Charter (forthcoming)

  • Benjamin M. Wolkow, University of Georgia, 2022 (Chair)
  • Wilfrid E. Major, Louisiana State University, 2020
  • Antony Augoutstakis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2020
  • Albert T. Watanabe, Louisiana State University, 2021
  • Robert T. White, Beaumont School (OH), 2021
  • Douglas C. Clapp, Samford University (AL), 2022
  • Amy Lather, Wake Forest University (NC), 2022
  • Adam Serfass, Kenyon College (OH), 2022
Subcommittee on the CAMWS Excavation and Field School Awards
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at archaeology@camws.org.
The Excavation and Field School Award Subcommittee can be reached at archaeologycommmittee@camws.org.


  • Victor M. Martinez, University of Arizona, 2022 (Chair)
  • Duane W. Roller, The Ohio State University, 2020
  • Andrew J. Carroll, Independent Scholar (MA), 2021
  • Shannon R. Flynt,Samford University (AL), 2021
  • Melissa M. Morison, Grand Valley State University (MI), 2022
  • Davide M. Zori, Baylor University (TX), 2022
Subcommittee on the CAMWS First Book Award
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at firstbook@camws.org.
The Subcommitee for the CAMWS First Book Award can be reached at firstbookcommittee@camws.org.


  • Jennifer L. Larson, Kent State University (OH), 2020 (Chair)
  • Ruth Scodel, University of Michigan, 2020
  • Lisa A. Hughes, University of Calgary (AB), 2020
  • Meghan J. DiLuzio, Baylor University (TX), 2020
  • Neil W. Bernstein, Ohio University, 2021
  • Kathryn A. Simonsen, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2022
Subcommittee on CAMWS Undergraduate Awards
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at undergraduate@camws.org.
The Stewart Scholarship Subcommittee can be reached at undergraduatecommittee@camws.org.


  • Kristen A. Ehrhardt, John Carroll University (OH), 2022 (Chair)
  • Hilary J. Bouxsein, St. Olaf College (MN), 2020
  • Ashley A. Simone,Columbia University (NY), 2020
  • Tadeusz Mazurek, University of Notre Dame (IN), 2021
  • Valerio Caldesi Valeri, University of Kentucky, 2021
  • Stephen M. Kershner, Austin Peay State University (TN), 2022
Subcommittee on the School Awards
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at schoolawards@camws.org.
The full committee can be reached at schoolawardscommittee@camws.org.


  • Nick L. Fletcher, Hawken School (OH), 2021 (Co-Chair)
  • Margaret W. Musgrove, University of Central Oklahoma, 2020 (Co-Chair)
  • Scott A. Cochran, Siegel High School (TN), 2020
  • Sam L. Caldis, Brown University (RI), 2020
  • Kathleen M. Kirsch, St. Agnes School (MN), 2020
  • Caleb X. Dance, Washington and Lee University (VA), 2021
  • Evelyn W. Adkins, Case Western Reserve University (OH), 2021
  • Karl P. Frerichs, University School (OH), 2021
  • Andrew Burrow, Mountain View Jr. High School (AL), 2022
  • Elizabeth Deacon, University of Colorado Boulder, 2022
  • Lindley Henson, Seton Catholic Preparatory Academy (AZ), 2022
  • David West, Ashland University (OH), 2022
Subcommittee on the Manson A. Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Awards
This subcommittee also makes the Ruebel Undergraduate Travel Awards
Chair of the subcommittee can be reached at stewartteacher@camws.org.
The Stewart Teacher Training and Travel Subcommittee can be reached at stewartteachercommittee@camws.org.


  • Ruth R. Caston, University of Michigan, 2021 (Chair)
  • Jason J. Hansen, Tempe Preparatory Academy (AZ), 2020
  • Erin Moodie, Purdue University (IN), 2021
  • Hillary Lehmann, Knox College (IL), 2021
  • Salvador Bartera, Mississippi State University, 2022
  • David Ligon, Ursuline Academy (OH), 2022
Subcommittee on CAMWS Summer Travel Awards
(Semple, Grant, and Benario)
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at sgb@camws.org.
The Summer Travel Awards Subcommittee can be reached at sgbcommittee@camws.org.


  • Ariana Traill, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2021 (Chair)
  • Amy Sowder-Koch, Towson University (MD), 2022
  • Amy E. K. Vail, St. John Fisher College (NY), 2020
  • Elizabeth A. Manwell, Kalamazoo College (MI), 2020
  • Jennifer Starkey, San Diego State University (CA), 2021
  • Katherine Wasdin, University of Maryland (DC), 2021
  • Tara J. Ligon, Walnut Hills High School (OH), 2022
  • Benjamin J. Smith, Vanguard College Preparatory School (TX), 2022
Subcommittee on Teaching Awards (Kraft and CAMWS)
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at teaching@camws.org.
The Teaching Awards Subcommittee can be reached at teachingcommittee@camws.org.


  • Laury A.Ward, Hillsdale College (MI), 2021 (Chair)
  • J. Matthew Harrington, Tufts University (MA), 2020
  • Ian N. Hochberg, St. Stephen’s and St. Agnes’ School (VA), 2020
  • Adrienne Hagen, Monmouth College (IL), 2020
  • Jeanne M. Neumann, Davidson College (NC), 2021
  • Daniel W. Turkeltaub, Santa Clara University (CA), 2021
  • Thomas Rose, Randolph-Macon College (VA), 2022
  • Amy Leonard, Grady High School (GA), 2022
AD-HOC COMMITTEES
Diversity and Inclusion Committee
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at diversity@camws.org.
The Diversity Committee can be reached at diversitycommittee@camws.org.


  • Theodore A. Tarkow, University of Missouri, 2020 (Chair)
  • Leanna L. Boychenko, Loyola University Chicago (IL), 2020
  • Dennis C. Dickerson, Jr., Christian Brothers High School (TN), 2020
  • Benjamin S. Haller, Virginia Wesleyan University, 2020
  • Jeffrey J. Namiotka, Western Reserve Academy (OH), 2020
  • Anna Peterson, Pennsylvania State University, 2020
  • Lisa M. Piacesi, Camp Creek Middle School (GA), 2020
  • Angela L. Pitts, University of Mary Washington (VA), 2020
  • Heather L . Vincent, Eckerd College (FL), 2020
Teacher Training Initiative Committee
The chair of this subcommittee can be reached at tti@camws.org.
The Teaching Awards Subcommittee can be reached at tticommittee@camws.org.

  • Fanny L. Dolansky, Brock University (ON), 2020 (Chair)
  • Catherine C. Keane, Washington University in St. Louis (MO), 2020
  • Thomas Garvey, The Meadows School (NV), 2020
  • Charles T. Ham, Grand Valley State University (MI), 2020
  • Benjamin C. Holec, Bishop Ireton High School (VA), 2020
  • Ginny T. Lindzey, Dripping Springs High School (TX), 2020
  • John J. Miller, University of Virginia, 2020
  • Matthew D. Panciera, Gustavus Adolphus College (MN), 2020
  • Lauri Reitzammer, University of Colorado Boulder, 2020
Other Officers
Historian
Ward W. Briggs (University of South Carolina, 2021)

Podcaster
Samuel L. Kindick (University of Colorado Boulder, 2022)

Photographer
Kristin O. Lord (Wilfrid Laurier University, ON, 2021)

 CAMWS Delegate to Federation of the Societies
of Classical Studies (FIEC) 
Alden Smith (Baylor University, TX, 2021)
 
CAMWS Webmanager
Vacant
 
Web Editor
Emma C. Vanderpool (Trickum Middle School, GA)

CAMWS Orator
David J. White (Baylor University, TX, 2021)
 
CAMWS Social Media Director
E. L. Meszaros (Brown University, RI, 2022)
 
affiliated with CAMWS
CAMWS liaison to GSIC: Bartolo Natoli (Randolph-Macon College, VA, 2022)
2019-20 STATE, PROVINCIAL, AND REGIONAL VICE-PRESIDENTS
A regional or state/provincial Vice President can be reached via email by typing the region, state or province followed by @camws.org. For example, the Vice President for the Canada region can be reached at canada@camws.org. The Vice President for Ontario can be reached at ontario@camws.org
At-Large Region
Regional VP: Nicolas P. Gross, University Of Delaware (2022)
Canada Region
Regional VP: Christina Vester, University Of Waterloo (ON) (2020)

  • Manitoba: Pauline L. Ripat, University of Winnipeg (MB), 2020
  • Ontario: Mariapia Pietropaolo, McMaster University, 2022
  • Saskatchewan: Gillian Ramsey, University of Regina (SK), 2021
Gulf Region
Regional VP: Nathalie Roy, Glasgow Middle School (LA) (2022)

  • Alabama: P. Andrew Montgomery, Samford University (AL), 2020
  • Louisiana: Emily E. Batinski, Louisana State University, 2021
  • Mississippi: Jonathan B. Fenno, University of Mississippi, 2021
  • Texas: William S. Duffy, St. Philip’s College (TX), 2021
Northern Plains Region
Regional VP: Christopher Nappa, University Of Minnesota (2020)

  • Minnesota: Kyle C. Helms, St. Olaf College (MN), 2020
  • North Dakota: Eric Ross, University of North Dakota, 2022
  • South Dakota: Rocki T. Wentzel, Augustana College (SD), 2020
  • Wisconsin: Adriana Brook, Lawrence University (WI), 2020
Ohio Valley Region
Regional VP: Christopher V. Trinacty, Oberlin College, OH (2022)

  • Ohio: Paul A. Iversen, Case Western Reserve University (OH), 2022
  • West Virginia: Christina E. Franzen, Marshall University (WV), 2022
Plains Region
Regional VP: Marcia H. Lindgren, University Of Iowa (2022)

  • Iowa: Rosemary Moore, University of Iowa, 2021
  • Kansas: Craig T. Jendza, University of Kansas, 2020
  • Missouri: Anatole Mori, University of Missouri, 2021
  • Nebraska: Anne E. Duncan, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, 2022
  • Oklahoma: John H. Hansen, University of Oklahoma, 2022
Rocky Mountain Region
Regional VP: Luke Gorton, University Of New Mexico (2021)

  • Arizona: Joseph R. O’Neill, Arizona State University, 2021
  • Colorado: Reina E. Callier, University of Colorado, Boulder, 2020
  • Nevada: Kristian L Lorenzo: The Meadows School (NV), 2022
  • New Mexico: John W. Roth, The Bosque School (NM), 2021
  • Utah: Seth A. Jeppesen, Brigham Young University (UT), 2022
  • Wyoming, Laura A. De Lozier, University of Wyoming, 2021
Southeast Region
Regional VP: Andrew T. Alwine, College Of Charleston (SC) (2022)

  • Florida: Victoria E. Pagán Wolpert, University of Florida, 2022
  • Georgia: Kathleen R. Burt, Middle Georgia State University, 2022
  • South Carolina: Jason Osborne, University of South Carolina, 2022
Tidewater Region
Regional VP: Keyne A. Cheshire, Davidson College (NC) (2020)

  • North Carolina: Lisa Ellison, East Carolina University (NC), 2022
  • Virginia: Erika Zimmermann Damer, University of Richmond (VA), 2020
Upper South Region
Regional VP: Christopher P. Craig, University Of Tennessee (2021)

  • Arkansas: Rebecca Resinski, Hendrix College (AR), 2021
  • Kentucky: Kathleen Quinn, Northern Kentucky University, 2022
  • Tennessee: Edward Long, Clarksville High School (TN), 2020
2019-20 FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTORS
Through November 12, 2019
Awards & Scholarships
Caroline Bishop
John Breuker, Jr.
Fanny L. Dolansky
Edward Gaffney
Rebecca R. Harrison
Liane Houghtalin
Kenneth F. Kitchell, Jr.
Eddie R. Lowry, Jr.
Alice N. Mulberry
Jacob E. Nyenhuis
Margaret M. Toscano
Osman S. Umurhan
Christina M. Vester
Heather L. Vincent

Bolchazy Fund
Anonymous
Stephen Pilewski
Margaret M. Toscano

Excavation / Field School Fund
Deborah Beck
Fanny L. Dolansky
Laura Gawlinski
David H. Sick
Margaret M. Toscano

General Fund
E. Del Chrol
Jenny Strauss Clay
Ann Raia Colaneri
James H. Dee
Kristopher F. B. Fletcher
Nicolas P. Gross
Anne H. Groton
Rebecca R. Harrison
Georgia L. Irby 
Sharon L. James
Kenneth J. Reckford
Sophie Mills
Jacob E. Nyenhuis
Christine G. Perkell
Richard G. Peterson
Wolfgang Polleichtner
Stephanie M. Pope
Stephanie J. Quinn
Robert J. Rabel
John L. Robinson
Susan C. Salay
James P. Sandrock
Yasuko Taoka
Theodore A. Tarkow
Margaret M. Toscano
Osman S. Umurhan
Christina M. Vester

Phinney Greek Prize
Antonios C. Augoustakis

Ruebel Fund
Victor Castellani
T. Davina McClain
Thomas J. Sienkewicz

Teacher Training Initiative
Kevin Abblett
Aileen Ajootian
Emily E. Batinski
Caroline Bishop
Ruth R. Caston
Howard W. Chang
Kerry A. Christensen
Jenny Strauss Clay
Virginia M. Closs
Christopher P. Craig
James H. Crozier
Paolo Custodi
Bradyn M. Debysingh
Katrina M. Dickson
Peter M. Dodington
Fanny L. Dolansky
Kenneth M. Draper
William S. Duffy
Kelly P. Dugan
Lisa Ellison
Christelle Fischer-Bovet
Elizabeth A. Fisher
Edward Gaffney
Lorenzo F. Garcia, Jr.
Luke A. Gorton
Charles T. Ham
Rebecca R. Harrison
Barbara A. Hill
Liane Houghtalin
Samuel J. Huskey
Garrett A. Jacobsen
Dennis P. Kehoe
Nathan M. Kish
Donald E. Lavigne
Ellen Lee
Amy K. Leonard
Sherwin D. Little
William I. Manton
Sarah J. Miller
Kathleen B. Muniz
Margaret W. Musgrove
Elizabeth T. Neely
Carole E. Newlands
Robert B. Patrick, Jr.
Martha J. Payne
Mary L. Pendergraft
Stephen Pilewski
Kurt A. Raaflaub
Teresa R. Ramsby
Daniel N. Ristin
John W. Roth
Nathalie R. Roy
Sydnor Roy
Stephen A. Sansom
David J. Schenker
Abigail Serfass
Adam Serfass 
Susanna M. Shelton
Kathryn A. Simonsen
Diane Arnson Svarlien
John Svarlien 
Renée Szostek
David W. Tandy
Daniel W. Turkeltaub
Aleydis Van de Moortel
Heather L. Vincent
Mark F. Williams
James L. Zainaldin

Total Donation Amount: $6938.00
MEMBERSHIP
Individual Memberships
Individual membership in CAMWS for the fiscal year July 1 through June 30 may be purchased for $65 ($30 for student, retiree, first-time teacher, or new CAMWS member; $45 for contingent faculty). Joint spouse/partner membership is available for $90, retired spouse/partner membership for $50 Life memberships are also available for individual or for joint spouse/partner. 

A membership includes a one-year subscription to The Classical Journal as well as on-line access to the Loeb Classical Library. Please indicate on the membership form whether you would prefer to receive CJ electronically (via JSTOR) or in print. For an extra $5 you may receive the journal in both formats. Please note that membership in CAMWS provides electronic subscription only to the current volume of CJ. CAMWS members wishing to have access to back issues of the journal can do so at a special rate through JStor. Please contact Tom Sienkewicz at stcamws@camws.org for additional information.

The CAMWS Newsletter is sent electronically to all members with e-mail addresses. If you would like to receive a print version in addition, you may indicate that on the membership form.

As part of your CAMWS membership, you are automatically subscribed to Classical Journal On-Line from which you will received frequent reviews of new books in the classical field, unless you indicate on the membership form that you opt out of this subscription.

Membership in CAMWS also includes on-line access to the Loeb Classical Library. (Please note that it may take two or more weeks following payment to process this on-line access.) CAMWS members can also request a complimentary subscription to Greek Keys.

Individual membership in CAMWS makes one eligible to submit an abstract for a CAMWS meeting and to apply for various CAMWS awards and scholarships.

Please note: Individual memberships or subscriptions to CJ sent to an address outside the United States or Canada are subject to a $20 postage surcharge. Individual subscriptions automatically include membership in CAMWS.

You may use the CAMWS membership form to join ACL or SALVI, subscribe to any of eight other scholarly journals, order a copy of Herbert Benario’s CAMWS: A History of the First Eighty Years, purchase various CAMWS merchandise (including 6-inch ‘Roman’ rulers, a CAMWS YoYo, shot glasses or koozies) and/or make a tax-deductible contribution to CAMWS.

An individual must be a current member of CAMWS in order to 1.) submit panel, workshop or individual paper proposals for the annual meeting, 2.) register for the annual meeting; 3.) apply for any CAMWS awards or scholarships, including CPL awards; or 4.) hold a CAMWS office or serve on a CAMWS committee.

If you are already a CAMWS member and wish to order CAMWS memorabilia or subscribe to other journals, please use this Miscellaneous Order Form.

How to Join or Renew Your Membership

Please use this electronic membership form. Payment by credit card is possible through the CAMWS web site (A $3 processing fee will be added to each credit-card transaction.) or you can print out this membership form and mail it to CAMWS with a check or money order drawn on a U.S. bank or a bank that uses U.S. routing codes to:

CAMWS
Monmouth College
700 E. Broadway
Monmouth, IL 61462
Institutional Membership
Benefits of Institutional Membership

If your institution or organization becomes a member of CAMWS, it receives the following benefits:

  • One CAMWS award for an outstanding student to be chosen by your institution. The student receives a congratulatory certificate stating that your school has designated the student as a recipient of a CAMWS Award for Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies for the current academic year, plus a free membership in CAMWS for the following academic year. As CAMWS members, these students would have full access to the on-line Loeb Classical Library. To designate your student honoree(s), please complete the on-line award designation form and submit it no later than May 1st for each academic year. For a list of previous recipients, see CAMWS Award For Outstanding Accomplishment in Classical Studies.
  • The option to choose additional student award recipients ($30 each). Payment required by May 1st of each academic year.
  • A certificate stating your institution’s support of CAMWS.
  • Eligibility for your students to compete in the CAMWS Sight Translation Contests (required for colleges and universities).
  • Eligibility for your students to apply for Semple, Grant and Benario Travel Awards (required only for colleges and universities outside the CAMWS region).
  • Publication of institutional announcements free of charge in the CAMWS Newsletter and on the CAMWS website.
  • 20% discount on ads in the annual meeting program and in The Classical Journal.
  • For K-12 Institutional Members, one complimentary registration at the CAMWS Annual Meeting (not including the banquet).
  • Inclusion on the list of CAMWS Member Institutions, which will be
  • printed in the program of the CAMWS Annual Meeting (if membership is received prior to the printing of the meeting program)
  • printed in the CAMWS Newsletter (if membership is received by May 1st)
  • posted on the CAMWS Website (with hotlinks to the websites of institutional members)

Institutional membership also supports CAMWS awards and scholarships and efforts to promotion Classics in the CAMWS region.

For further information, please contact stcamws@camws.org.

Becoming an Institutional Member
 
Any educational institution or organization can become a member of CAMWS by paying an annual fee of either $60 (for a K-12 school or a college or university offering a B.A. in Classics), $75 (for a college or university offering a M.A. only in Classics) or $110 (for a university offering a Ph.D. in Classics). Please note that institutional memberships are for the fiscal year beginning July 1st through June 30th. Please submit your membership application and payment as soon as possible in the fiscal year. The cost of additional student honorees is $30 per student.

To become an institutional member (and/or to order up to two additional student honorees), you can use this on-line form camws.org/membership/ institutionform.php. Payment can be made by check via groundmail or online by credit card or Paypal account A $3 processing fee will be added to each credit-card transaction.

Please send your payment by a check or money order to:

CAMWS
Monmouth College
700 E. Broadway
Monmouth, IL 61462

To designate your student honoree(s), please complete the on-line award designation form and submit it no later than May 1st for each academic year.

If your institution requires an invoice to pay by check, please send an email to stcamws@camws.org to request an invoice.
CAMWS MEMBERS IN THE NEWS
CAMWS recognizes Thomas Keeline of Washington University St. Louis as a recipient of a 2019 CAMWS First Book Prize for The Reception of Cicero in the Early Roman Empire: The Rhetorical Schoolroom and the Creation of a Cultural Legend (Cambridge University Press, 2018)

CAMWS recognizes Salvador Bartera (left) and Donna Clevinger (right) of Mississippi State University as recipients of the 2019 Outreach Prize of the Society for Classical Studies. The same project received the 2018-19 CPL Award for an Outstanding Promotion Project in a College/University
CAMWS recognizes Andrew C. Johnston of Yale University as a recipient of a  2019 CAMWS First Book Prize for The Sons of Remus: Identity in Roman Gaul and Spain (Harvard University Press, 2017). He is also the recipient of the 2019 Goodwin Award from the Society for Classical Studies for the same book. Johnston is interviewed by CAMWS podcaster Sam Kindick here.

CAMWS recognizes Carole Newlands of the University of Colorado Boulder for being one of only seven faculty members in the University of Colorado system to be named a Distinguished Professor this year. 
CAMWS recognizes Matthew Panciera of Gustavus Adolphus College (MN) as the recipient of an NEH grant for a seminar for school teachers entitled “Roman Daily Life in Petronius and Pompeii.”
CAMWS recognizes Robert Holschuh Simmons of Monmouth College as the recipient of a Community Action Grant from the Illinois Humanities Council for Classics Day V in Fall 2020.
CAMWS recognizes Lynn Thomason of Lincoln High School (SD) as the recipient of the 2019 Dr. John W. Harris Teacher of the Year in the Sioux Falls School District.
CAMWS recognizes Adam Serfass of Kenyon College as the recipient of the 2019 Bolchazy Pedagogy Book Award for Views of Rome: A Greek Reader (University of Oklahoma Press, 2018).

Do you have news to share? Let us know! We welcome news of note from both individual and institutional members: newsletter@camws.org.
CLASSICS IN THE NEWS
A Classical Education
The Spring edition of Oberlin Alumni Magazine featured Kirk Ormand’s interview with Michele Ronnick about her research on the life of William Scarborough (Oberlin, 1875) and Bolchazy-Carducci's recent facsimile edition of Scarborough's First Lessons in Greek.

October: Oldest written record of Homer's Odyssey

Archeologists now believe they have found what appears to be the earliest known written record of the second of Homer’s tales, the Odyssey at the site of the Temple of Zeus in the ancient city of Olympia in Greece.

Read more
www.richerresourcespublicat...
September: Emily Wilson receives MacArthur “Genius Grant”

Emily Wilson, classical studies professor in the School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania, has been named a 2019 MacArthur Fellow by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Wilson has received attention worldwide...

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penntoday.upenn.edu
August: Two unlooted Mycenaean tombs unearthed...

Greece’s culture ministry says two intact chamber tombs dating from 1400 to 1200 B.C. have been unearthed near the southern town of Nemea at a site already known for its cluster of tombs, most of which had been looted before their discovery.

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www.ekathimerini.com
July: Babylon gains Unesco World Heritage status

The ancient Mesopotamian city of Babylon has been declared a Unesco World Heritage Site. Iraq had been lobbying since 1983 for the 4,000-year-old site to be added to the United Nations’ prestigious list. The city was famous for its Hanging...

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www.bbc.com