Who looks outside dreams, who looks inside awakes.
 ~ Carl Jung

Blake Ward's new works from his Spirits Collection illustrate his  contemporary  approach to figurative sculpture with a contrarian break from formal academicism. Ward challenges the classical figure by exposing the interior evoking a dialogue  between our internal and external selves.  While building on the techniques of  figurative sculpture lost in antiquity, Ward remains true to their  representational qualities, yet his Spirit Collection is a transgression of the rules, crossing over into the abstract and ethereal realms of our inner worlds. 

Ward's 1/4 life-size, partial figures materialize before us. Both seductive and tragic, their perfect proportions reflect the hidden perspectives of our human condition. The textured exterior surface alludes to the complexity of our individuality. The open, exposed interior elicits introspection. Holding fast to his love of the human figure, Ward leads us toward self-discovery.


Currently living in Monaco, Canadian artist, Blake Ward will be attending the opening reception.  

THURSDAY * APRIL 7 *  5:30 to 8:00 pm

Please join us to welcome Blake to Chicago! 


HILTON |ASMUS  CONTEMPORARY
716 N. Wells *  Chicago
tel: 312.475.1788
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SAVE THE DATE! 
APRIL 14
THE ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM  -  THE WORLD'S OLDEST COMPUTER


TERRY POULOS 

SCULPTURES ON EXHIBIT AT

NATIONAL HELLENIC MUSEUM
 APRIL 14 - 30 

Dr. John Seiradakis,  Radio Astronomer and Physics Professor at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, and one of  the foremost experts on the Antikythera Mechanism, will discuss the analog computer from 205 BC that was designed to predict astronomical positions, accompanied by Terry Poulos' sculptures. 



More than 2000 years ago, Greek scientists created the world's first computer.
 A mechanism that used brass gearwheels to predict the movements of the sun, the moon, and most of the planets, now known as the Antikythera Mechanism, is the world's first computer.  Found by Greek sponge divers in an ancient shipwreck, its corroded remnants give us fresh insights into history and challenge our assumptions about technology transfer over the ages.

Dr. John Seiradakis, Radio Astronomer and Physics Professor at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, will discuss the work of an international team of experts who used 21st century technology to decode the truth behind the world's first computer.  The discussion will be accompanied by the sculptures of our own "Indiana Jones" Terry Poulos, who created the "Arti-kythera ~Homage to the World's First Computer."
HILTON | ASMUS CONTEMPORARY
716 N. Wells St.
Chicago, IL 60654
tel: 312.475.1788
info@hilton-asmus.com