FEBRUARY | NEWSLETTER
FEBRUARY 2021 | A NOTE FROM STACY COOK

EXTREME COLD, ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE, & BIOMASS HEAT
 

This Valentine’s Day weekend brought subzero temperatures to the Midwest and below-freezing temperatures as far south as the Gulf of Mexico. The extreme cold weather pushed the natural gas and electricity transportation systems to near a breaking point. As I write this on Thursday, there are still millions of residents of Texas who are without power to heat their homes, many are without water, and the natural gas delivery system continues to struggle with supplying gas to customers due to freeze-offs at wellheads and injection points on the system.

The infrastructure that delivers energy into our homes in the United States is extensive and intricate, and very dependable when the system is kept in balance. Severe weather can quickly disrupt that balance. Winter storms are no picnic in the Midwest if utility services are lost for an extended period of time, it is not only uncomfortable but can be dangerous to your property and persons if you lose the ability to heat your home.

When I was growing up in a small town 30 miles from the Canadian border most of my neighbors had wood stoves, some were no more than a simple barrel stove. They were not very efficient, but when the power went out nobody froze and plumbing remained intact because everybody had a store of BTU's in their woodpile that could be utilized to heat the home. We had BTU security in a region without natural gas service, and with some of the coldest winter weather in the lower 48 by using locally available non-marketable biomass residues. (if you read “Little House on the Prairie” when you were a child, you read about how Almonzo and Charles used tightly twisted bundles of straw as stove fuel to survive through a blizzard on the Dakota plains. In some modern facilities, various byproducts of agriculture and food grain processing are an important feedstock in the creation of both heat and power.)

Modern wood heating appliances have become much more efficient, cleaner-burning, and safer than the wood stoves of years past. If you are considering a backup heat source or primary, whether in your home or in your business, and you have access to chips, pellets, firewood, cordwood, or other forest and agriculture residues, heating with biomass might be just the thing for you.

I would encourage you to give consideration to plentiful and renewable biomass for your next heating application. The members of the HTM steering committee can help connect you to individuals that can provide insight or assistance with your biomass heating plans.

Stacy Cook


AUTHOR:
Stacy Cook
President of Koda Energy, LLC
Past President of HTM, Executive and Steering Committee Member

UPCOMING EVENTS
  • June 22 | European Pellet Conference
  • Action Team Monthly Meetings
LOCAL BIOMASS
  • Biomass for Sale
  • Biomass Wanted
FEBRUARY SPOTLIGHT RESOURCES
  • SHARABLE VIDEO: Biomass Heating Systems Explained
  • SHARABLE CALCULATOR TOOL: Fuel Cost Compare
BIOMASS AND ENVIRONMENT
  • What is the Difference between an EPA-certified and EPA-qualified Appliance?
  • 2020 EPA Emission Standard
BIOMASS AND ECONOMY
  • State Incentives to Add a Stove or Boiler
  • Tax Credit- Pellet and Wood Heating Appliances

HTM STEERING COMMITTEE
  • Jeremy Mortl* - President
  • Sabina Dhungana* - Vice President
  • T.J. Morice* - Secretary/Treasurer
  • Brian Brashaw* - Liaison to the Steering Committee
  • Stacy Cook*
  • William Cook
  • Bruno Zagar
  • David Neuman
  • Joseph Donnell
  • Becky Philipp
  • Tim Portz - National Rep
  • Ben Rose
  • Adam Sherman - National Rep
  • Jill Thibert
* Executive Members
European Pellet Conference NEW DATE 2021

AUSTRIA In 2021, the conference – the largest annual pellet event worldwide with more than 450 participants from over 50 countries each year – shows how we can make a green recovery happen in practice and how the pellet sector can profit.

Take the opportunity and share your work, projects, research results, achievements, ideas, and insights with the worldwide sustainable energy community!

June 22, 2021 (Now offering an online option!)
Photo Source: Canva
Join in Our Monthly Action Team Meeting


WHAT TEAMS CAN I BE A PART OF?

WHAT DO ACTION TEAMS DO?

  • Discuss industry challenges and how to overcome them in each sector
  • Network and support HTM goals for the renewable biomass initiative
  • Create awareness and grow demand for biomass thermal energy

WHEN DO THEY MEET
HTM Joint Action Team calls are held, as needed,
the Third Tuesday of each month at 1:30 p.m. CST
Additional action team calls are scheduled on demand.

CAN I JOIN? 
Yes. In fact, we're excited to have you! To find the action team with the best fit for you, contact HTM's Becky Philipp (bphilipp@auri.org) to join.
LOCAL BIOMASS
Photo Source: Canva
Local Biomass Market
FEBRUARY SPOTLIGHT RESOURCES
SHARABLE VIDEO: Biomass Heating Systems Explained
ENERGY SAVING TRUST
Photo Source: Canva
SHARABLE CALCULATOR TOOL:
Compare Fuel Costs
Pellet fuel is a cost stable and price-competitive fuel. A good way to understand the price benefits of pellet fuel is to compare it against other home heating fuels. The following chart can assist in comparing home heating fuels. The values shown are national averages. You may enter your own costs to compare. Enter amounts in dollars except for the cost of electricity, which is in cents.
BIOMASS AND ENVIRONMENT
Photo Source: Canva
What is the Difference between an EPA-certified and EPA-qualified Appliance?

Photo Source: Canva
2020 EPA Emission Standard
In 1988, the EPA originally set a particulate emission limit of 7.5 grams per hour for non-catalytic wood stoves and 4.1 grams per hour for catalytic wood stoves. In 1995, Washington State set a 4.5 gram an hour standard, which influenced the entire industry and by the late 1990s, most stoves emitted less than 4.5 grams.

In 2015, the EPA adopted the 4.5 limit and as of 2020, the EPA set a standard of 2 grams an hour for wood and pellet stoves, or 2.5 grams an hour if stoves test with cordwood.
BIOMASS AND ECONOMY
Photo Source: Canva
State Incentives to Add a Stove or Boiler:
As of October 2020, eight states offer ongoing, statewide rebates or tax incentives to purchase and install a stove or boiler. 

Photo Source: Canva
Income Tax Credit Available for 26% of Purchase and Installation Costs of Qualifying Pellet and Wood Heating Appliances
A spending legislation and pandemic relief package was signed into law at the very end of December and included a long-sought-after tax credit for wood and pellet heating appliances.

MORE WAYS TO GET BIOMASS NEWS
Find Heating the Midwest on
your favorite online platform
Follow Heating the Midwest to find out about the latest
news, events, and action team updates!
Facebook
LinkedIn
Twitter
Do you tweet? tag @HTM_BiomassHeat if you have Biomass news for us!
BiomassMagazine.com
  • Printed Magazine
  • Free digital Magazine
  • Free e-Newsletters
  • Free Webinars
Pellet Mill Magazine Free to U.S. Subscribers.
  • Printed Magazine
  • Free digital Magazine
BROUGHT TO YOU BY HEATING THE MIDWEST