Vice President for Research & Economic Development
Proposal Services & Faculty Support
February Funding Focus Newsletter #1
What is a Limited Submission?
A limited submission solicitation (RFA, RFP, etc.) places a cap on the number of proposals that Auburn may submit to a sponsor. Auburn coordinates limited submissions by sending out a notification via this newsletter and creating competitions in the Auburn University Competition Space (also known as InfoReady).To apply to any limited submission posted below, click on the above link and search for your competition reflected on the page. Please refer to the Limited Submission Procedures page for a list of requirements.
Limited Submission Announcements

Grants for Arts Projects is the National Endowment for the Arts’ principal grants program for organizations based in the United States. Through project-based funding, the program supports public engagement with, and access to, various forms of art across the nation, the creation of excellent art, learning in the arts at all stages of life, and the integration of the arts into the fabric of community life. The Arts Endowment encourages applications from a variety of eligible organizations, e.g., with small, medium, or large budgets, and from rural to urban communities. Similarly, projects may be large or small, existing or new, and may take place in any part of the nation’s 50 states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. territories. 

A live webinar was recorded in January and can be accessed by clicking here.

Please note that the requirements for this submission
differ from the standard limited submission.

Institutional Limit: 1 Proposal
Internal Deadline: February 5, 2021 4:45 pm
LOI Due: February 11, 2021 11:59 pm EST
Full Proposals Due: Feb. 23, 2021 11:59 pm EST

The Equipment Grants Program (EGP) serves to increase access to shared-use special purpose equipment/instruments for fundamental and applied research for use in the food and agricultural sciences programs at institutions of higher education, including State Cooperative Extension Systems. The program seeks to strengthen the quality and expand the scope of fundamental and applied research at eligible institutions, by providing them with opportunities to acquire one shared-use piece of equipment/instrument that supports their research, research training, and extension goals and may be too costly and/or not appropriate for support through other NIFA grant programs. EGP grants are not intended to replace requests for equipment in individual project applications. The program emphasizes shared-use instrumentation that will enhance the capabilities of researchers, educators, and extension specialists both within and outside the proposing organization.

Proposals to the EGP must involve acquisition of a single, well-integrated piece of equipment/instrument. Well-integrated means that the ensemble of equipment that defines the instrument enables specific fundamental or applied research experiments in the food and agricultural sciences, including data science and data systems,; separating or removing an element or component of such an integrated instrument would preclude that research from occurring or succeeding. An instrument acquired with support from EGP is expected to be fully operational by the end of the award period.

The EGP does not support the acquisition of suites of equipment to outfit research laboratories /facilities or to conduct independent experiments simultaneously. Similarly, the EGP does not fund common, general purpose ancillary equipment that would normally be found in a laboratory and/or is relatively easily procured by the organization or through other NIFA grant programs. Rather, it is intended to help fund items of equipment that will upgrade infrastructure. Moreover, EGP does not fund research projects, including research that uses the equipment acquired with support from the program nor does it support installation, modification of facilities, training on equipment operation, or operation and maintenance of facilities or equipment.

Please note that the requirements for this submission
differ from the standard limited submission.

Institutional Limit: 2 proposals
Internal Deadline: February 12, 2021 4:45 pm
Full Proposals Due: March 16, 2021 5:00 pm EST
Limited Submission Reminders

Institutional Limit: 1 Proposal
Internal Deadline: February 5, 2021 4:45 pm
Full Proposals Due: March 16, 2021 5:00 pm EST

Institutional Limit: 1 Proposal
Internal Deadline: Friday, February 5, 2021 4:45 pm
Full Proposals Due: April 12, 2021 5:00 pm

*Please note, Limit on Number of Proposals per Organization: An institution may submit one proposal (either as a single institution or as sub-awardee or a member of an inter-institutional Consortia project) from each constituent school or college that awards degrees in an S-STEM eligible discipline.

Institutional Limit: See above
Internal Deadline: February 10, 2021 4:45 pm
Full Proposals Due: April 7, 2021 5:00 pm
IMPORTANT UPDATES

Separate workshops will be held to introduce and explain the Creative Work and Social Impact Scholarship Funding Program (CWSIS) and the Research Support Program (RSP) Internal Awards Programs. The workshops are designed to introduce these new awards programs, the funding levels, application and review processes, and key dates. There will be two opportunities to sign up for each program. The sessions will be recorded and made available after the workshops as well.

Agenda:
  • Introduction and program description
  • Video tutorial
  • Review process
  • Remarks by ADRs
  • Proposal development
  • Time for questions and answers

CWSIS (SP400)
  • Tuesday, February 9, 2021 10:00 am
  • Wednesday, February 10, 2021 1:30 pm

RSP (SP410)
  • Wednesday, February 10, 2021 10:00 am
  • Thursday, February 11, 2021 2:30 pm

You can register for the workshops through FastTrain (Zoom link will be provided). The sign-in for FastTrain is located within the AU Access Portal. If you have any questions about FastTrain, please contact autrain@auburn.edu.

If you have questions about the workshops, please contact Dr. Robert Holm at rzh0021@auburn.edu or x4-5877.

ACS PRF research grant programs support fundamental research in the petroleum field, and development of the next generation of engineers and scientists through advanced scientific education. Research areas supported include chemistry, the earth sciences, chemical and petroleum engineering, and related fields such as polymers and materials science. Membership in the American Chemical Society is not a requirement or a factor in awarding ACS PRF grants.

The next submission window is February 15 - March 12, 2021. They have adopted a new PRF Proposal Submission System. Click here to access information about this process.

Additionally, there was a webinar on January 21, 2021 at 1:00 EST on the new application process that they plan to record and post on the PRF website.
Hanover Research Queue has Openings Available for
Proposal Review after February 8, 2021

In order to provide resources for faculty and staff, Auburn University has partnered with Hanover Research for a number of grant development solutions including: Pre-proposal Support; Proposal Development; and Capacity Building. Their full-service grant development solutions are available to set goals, build strategies to achieve key grantseeking objectives, and develop grant proposals that are well-planned, researched, and written. For information regarding Hanover’s core capabilities and project time lines, click here . If you are interested in a slot in the queue, please e-mail Tony Ventimiglia ( ventiaf@auburn.edu ).

The spring 2021 virtual Faculty Research Symposium opened on Friday, January 29, with four synchronous roundtable sessions offered via Zoom, and asynchronous opportunities to view research posters and watch pre-recorded panels focused on four key areas for high-impact interdisciplinary work.
 
The Auburn Research Faculty Symposium website includes descriptions of the roundtable sessions and Moderated Auburn Talks Panels, as well as a program for the virtual poster session.
 
Posters and recorded sessions will remain available throughout the spring semester. The event is hosted in Canvas Catalog available at this site, and participants need to enroll in the Canvas course. New users will need to follow the prompts to create a login for Auburn University Catalog.

Case Studies in Collaboration and Teamwork

Interdisciplinary efforts are becoming more critical for scientific discovery and translational research efforts. Team science is the collaborative effort to address scientific challenges that leverage the strengths and expertise of professionals trained in different fields. These individuals work together, as a team, to achieve common goals that could not be accomplished by the individuals themselves.

An eight-week, case-based course, utilizing the National Institute of Health’s Collaboration and Team Science Field Guide, 2nd Edition, along with included brief case studies to help scientists learn the basics of team science and collaboration as well as how to navigate the challenges of working in interdisciplinary teams. Readings from the Field Guide are supplemented by brief, pre-recorded lectures that expand upon the readings. Participants will meet, via Zoom, for one hour weekly to discuss the brief cases and address questions or specific issues.

Register for this free online training: Register

February 5, 2021 - March 26, 2021 10:00 am - 11:00 am

This Request for Information (RFI) invites input to NSF on the specific questions described below. Responses to this RFI will inform future NSF investments that address the opportunities identified. Individual researchers, collaborating groups or networks, and organizations are all welcome to respond.

  • Question 1 (max. 1000 words): Describe the interdisciplinary frontier to be explored. Explain how it builds on recent converging scientific or technical advances that have had high impact in more than one discipline, and outline new interdisciplinary avenues for understanding the brain that could be developed. Include discussion of specific critical open questions for the development of theory, experiments, applications, and/or new technologies.
  • Question 2 (max. 500 words): Describe the perspectives and interactions needed to pursue opportunities at this frontier most effectively. Consider potential strategies needed to bring together diverse perspectives and community leadership, to facilitate sustained creative interactions and collaborations, and to develop interdisciplinary expertise.

Submissions Due: March 31, 2021 11:59 pm EST
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FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

ECR’s Building Capacity for STEM Education Research (ECR: BCSER) solicitation supports projects that build individuals’ capacity to carry out high quality STEM education research that will enhance the nation’s STEM education enterprise and broaden the pool of researchers that can conduct fundamental research in STEM learning and learning environments, broadening participation in STEM fields, and STEM workforce development.

Specifically, ECR: BCSER supports activities that enable early and mid-career researchers to acquire the requisite expertise and skills to conduct rigorous fundamental research in STEM education. ECR: BCSER seeks to fund research career development activities on topics that are relevant to qualitative and quantitative research methods and design, including the collection and analysis of new qualitative or quantitative data, secondary analyses using extant datasets, or meta-analyses.

This career development may be accomplished through investigator-initiated projects or through professional development institutes that enable researchers to integrate methodological strategies with theoretical and practical substantive issues in STEM education. Early and mid-career faculty new to STEM education research, particularly underrepresented minority faculty and faculty at minority-serving and two-year institutions, are encouraged to submit proposals.

Proposals Due: February 26, 2021 5:00 pm

The Landmarks of American History and Culture program supports a series of one-week workshops for K-12 educators across the nation to enhance and strengthen humanities teaching at the K-12 level.

The program defines a landmark as a site of historic importance within the United States and its territories. Landmarks could include historic homes, museums, presidential libraries, and sites memorializing literary, artistic, or architectural achievements. Projects could take place in public spaces and neighborhoods, major waterways, national parks, or other locations of historic importance.

Projects employ a place-based approach and are designed to offer educators a unique and compelling opportunity to deepen and expand their knowledge of the diverse histories, cultures, traditions, languages, and perspectives of the American people. Applicants are encouraged to think creatively about place-based learning strategies, experiential learning methodologies, and other professional development goals. Projects explore central themes in American history and culture, including government, literature, the arts, architecture, archaeology, and related humanities subjects.

Proposals Due: March 9, 2021 11:59 pm EST

NEH Institutes are professional development programs that convene K-12 educators from across the nation in order to deepen and enrich their understanding of a variety of topics in the humanities and enrich their capacity for effective scholarship and teaching. Most fundamentally, institutes:  
  • allow immersive study of topics of significance to the humanities  
  • foster new fields of study and/or revitalize existing areas of inquiry  
  • reinvigorate teaching and increase intellectual impact in the classroom  
  • build lasting communities that foster participants’ intellectual and professional collaboration  
They should:  
  • ground the study in significant humanities texts and related resources  
  • explore multiple approaches to the topic in a manner that is both rigorous and collegial  
  • provide opportunities for deep and collaborative engagement with the topic  
  • model excellent scholarship and teaching  
  • consider how the topic engages recent developments in the scholarship, teaching, and curriculum of participants’ professional settings  
  • reach the widest possible audience for whom the topic is relevant  

Proposals Due: March 9, 2021 11:59 pm EST

NEH Institutes are professional development programs that convene higher education faculty from across the nation in order to deepen and enrich their understanding of a variety of topics in the humanities and enrich their capacity for effective scholarship and teaching.  
Most fundamentally, institutes:  
  • allow immersive study of topics of significance to the humanities  
  • foster new fields of study and/or revitalize existing areas of inquiry  
  • reinvigorate teaching and increase intellectual impact in the classroom  
  • build lasting communities that foster participants’ intellectual and professional collaboration  
They should:  
  • ground the study in significant humanities texts and related resources  
  • explore multiple approaches to the topic in a manner that is both rigorous and collegial  
  • provide opportunities for deep and collaborative engagement with the topic  
  • model excellent scholarship and teaching  
  • consider how the topic engages recent developments in the scholarship, teaching, and curriculum of participants’ professional settings  
  • reach the widest possible audience for whom the topic is relevant

Proposals Due: March 9, 2021 11:59 pm EST
Proposal Services & Faculty Support
844-5929 / clc0165@auburn.edu