MS. MONOPOLY
THE CONTROVERSY SURROUNDING MS. MONOPOLY
Hasbro's latest introduction is Ms. Monopoly, a twist on the board game classic. However, in this game, women make more than men and you receive bonuses for supporting female inventors. While many originally thrilled to see female representation, some were not so quick to applaud the Rhode Island toy maker. In this newsletter we are looking at this story from both sides as well as showcasing one of our favorite stories of the year so far, a local woman who is truly changing the game in a male dominated field.
THE RUNDOWN
"One of America's most recognizable board games is getting an upgrade. Hasbro is debuting a new game celebrating  women's empowerment  -- Ms. Monopoly, marking the first time in Monopoly history when a new mascot will be featured on the cover of the game. The twist? In Ms. Monopoly, female players will get more money.
Unlike the classic game, women will collect 240 Monopoly bucks when they pass "go," while male players will collect the usual 200. The idea is to create a game where women make more than men, the first game to do so, according to Hasbro."

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THE DEBATE
"What about Ms. Monopoly has critics up in arms? On the right, commentators are calling it political correctness gone wild. But even those more towards the left of the political spectrum have taken issue with the game. The problem with the pay gap is that it is an arbitrary difference in earnings based solely on gender. Flipping things so men make less just creates a mirror image of the problem. The new rules are clearly intended to raise awareness of unfairness, but on Twitter many felt this wasn't the right way to do it. Some even thought the new rules suggest women can't get ahead without a leg up."

HOW MS. MONOPOLY IS MISPLACED FEMINISM
Women have complained of being drowned out, overlooked, and ignored for centuries. But now, especially in the #MeToo moment, more people appear to be listening. Countless women have come forward to file charges against their abusers. Raises and promotions are being demanded—and hopefully received. Sports fans chanted “Equal pay!” in the stands this summer at the Women’s World Cup. Over all, that’s tremendous news. But Ms. Monopoly also underscores an effort by Madison Avenue to champion feminism as a branding gimmick rather than make tangible change. Consider the backlash faced by Gillette, Hard Candy, Nike, and State Street, among others, for using female-forward messaging as a source of profit, often at odds with their own companies’ policies toward women. If Hasbro is serious about women’s empowerment, perhaps the company could start by admitting that a woman invented Monopoly in the first place.

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We would love to hear your opinion! Is Ms. Monopoly misguided?
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TRUE PROGRESS IN THE MOST MALE POPULATED INDUSTRY
"The first three games of Pittsburgh’s football season wouldn’t seem like an exhibit of social change: a conference game against Virginia, a home matchup with Ohio and the 100th round of a rivalry with Penn State. But when Heather Lyke, Pitt’s athletic director, scrutinized the schedule, she noticed something beyond big matchups: The Panthers’ first three opponents were Division I universities where women were in charge of sports. “That will probably never happen again in my career,” Lyke said in her office last month, her tone at once elated and a little longing.The coincidental scheduling streak is a sign of the begrudging progress made in elevating women into the executive suites of American sports."

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