ST JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH, AMESBURY, MASSACHUSETTS


YOUTH CLASS
Baby Moses

August 21, 2020
for the week of
August 23, 2020


What you need: a watch, clock, or timer; a quiet creative activity; a candle (if it's okay, or an intentional object like a cross); a Bible, if you'd like; paper; something to write with; a snack. Have your class with a sibling or other family members, or enjoy this time by yourself.

1) Begin with a transition time – Peace & Quiet: enjoy a creative activity for about 10 minutes (journaling, clay, Legos, drawing, etc. Not a focus on a finished product; just enjoyment).

2) Next, clear that space, or move to another space, and light a candle (or place your intentional object). Settle in, and say a prayer, like: Your word is a lamp unto my feet and a light unto my path. (Psalm 119:105). Offer more prayers, silently, or out loud, if you want.

3) Here are the appointed readings for August 23. Find them in your Bible. Read them out loud. https://episcopalchurch.org/lectionary/pentecost-proper-16a (also in Spanish).

Our focus for this class = Exodus 1:8-2:10. Read this:

Now a new king arose over Egypt, who did not know Joseph. He said to his people, ‘Look, the Israelite people are more numerous and more powerful than we. Come, let us deal shrewdly with them, or they will increase and, in the event of war, join our enemies and fight against us and escape from the land.’ Therefore they set taskmasters over them to oppress them with forced labor. They built supply cities, Pithom and Rameses, for Pharaoh. But the more they were oppressed, the more they multiplied and spread, so that the Egyptians came to dread the Israelites. The Egyptians became ruthless in imposing tasks on the Israelites, and made their lives bitter with hard service in mortar and brick and in every kind of field labor. They were ruthless in all the tasks that they imposed on them.

The king of Egypt said to the Hebrew midwives, one of whom was named Shiphrah and the other Puah, ‘When you act as midwives to the Hebrew women, and see them on the birthstool, if it is a boy, kill him; but if it is a girl, she shall live.’ But the midwives feared God; they did not do as the king of Egypt commanded them, but they let the boys live. So the king of Egypt summoned the midwives and said to them, ‘Why have you done this, and allowed the boys to live?’ The midwives said to Pharaoh, ‘Because the Hebrew women are not like the Egyptian women; for they are vigorous and give birth before the midwife comes to them.’ So God dealt well with the midwives; and the people multiplied and became very strong. And because the midwives feared God, he gave them families. Then Pharaoh commanded all his people, ‘Every boy that is born to the Hebrews you shall throw into the Nile, but you shall let every girl live.’

Now a man from the house of Levi went and married a Levite woman. The woman conceived and bore a son; and when she saw that he was a fine baby, she hid him for three months. When she could hide him no longer she got a papyrus basket for him, and plastered it with bitumen and pitch; she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds on the bank of the river. His sister stood at a distance, to see what would happen to him.

The daughter of Pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, while her attendants walked beside the river. She saw the basket among the reeds and sent her maid to bring it. When she opened it, she saw the child. He was crying, and she took pity on him. ‘This must be one of the Hebrews’ children,’ she said. Then his sister said to Pharaoh’s daughter, ‘Shall I go and get you a nurse from the Hebrew women to nurse the child for you?’ Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, ‘Yes.’ So the girl went and called the child’s mother. Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, ‘Take this child and nurse it for me, and I will give you your wages.’ So the woman took the child and nursed it. When the child grew up, she brought him to Pharaoh’s daughter, and she took him as her son. She named him Moses, ‘because’, she said, ‘I drew him out of the water.’

Lots of decisions being made here, choices that alter lives and history. What would you do if you were the king? A slave? A midwife? A parent? Sibling? The daughter of Pharaoh?

Did you ever watch DreamWork's "Prince of Egypt"? Watch this clip, and decide if they got it right: click here. Look at the Egyptian imagery, listen to the story: perfect for visual and auditory learners. What?! Keep reading. . .
What is your learning style?

Learn more about this theory of how people learn, called "multiple intelligences" - where do you fit in, do you think?

How can this knowledge help you in school?
In the world?

Challenge yourself: when you read about Baby Moses, above - what caught your attention?

Here's a quick quiz to narrow down if you're an auditory (musical), visual (spatial), or tactile (bodily-kinesthetic) learner.

What's your learning style? What are your intelligences? Write and let me know!
4) Think about what you read, chat about it if you have company, look it up online (if allowed) and see if there's commentary about it – do you agree? Do you feel called to do something?

5) Brainstorm & make a poster, your choice: Top 10 Reasons to Disobey - for Good and/or Top 10 Ways that Help Me Learn. Take a pic; email me! (Thank you!)

6) Snack time! Prayers first: talk to God! "I'm grateful for, I'm worried about, I ask for," etc.
And/or take 5 or more minutes for centering prayer: relaxing into peace and letting thoughts go. Breathe! Enjoy your snack.

7) Finally, clean up your space(s), and say a closing prayer, like: Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. - Plato. Blow out the candle, or put away the intentional object (or leave it there if you'd like to create a little sacred area) and say out loud:
Go now in peace, to love and serve the Lord! Thanks be to God! ALLELUIA!
Extra:
Pettengill House has asked for our aid in raising money and/or collecting nonperishables (food and health items) - I challenge you to plan a fundraiser/collection: how will we do it?

News:
- LMK if you want the links to past classes.
- Anti-Racist book club (online) starting in September: This Book is Anti-Racist, by Tiffany Jewell. All ages, led by YOU. Malcolm just attended an amazing anti-racist awareness camp. Let's build on that. Tell me if you want to join us, RSVP ASAP!

LMK! - Peace, Linda
Adults: Please share this email with youth. If you'd like me also to send these emails to the kids, please email me their addresses & your permission. Thanks! Linda