August 30, 2020
~ Building Brockton Community One Positive Story at a Time
Your BuzzAround supports the dignity of all human beings, is actively anti-racist, and supportive of good law enforcement policies.
The Winners of Brockton Public Library's Poetry & Art Contest About the Suffragette Movement
What About Me?
By Melody Rivas
The war was not won in 1920
Yet there were still white women aplenty
Dropping their signs, leaving the streets, raising their voices to whoop with glee
Drowning out the frantic colored cries of
“What about me?”
The war was not won in 1930
Many women were left still yearning
To vote right next to their fair skinned peers,
To get what they had been denied for years
Their voices were silenced their ballots were empty
But they did not stop in 1920
The war was not won in 1950
but there was no time to waste on pity
American women from all shades of life
Natives, Hispanics, and Blacks alike
Never stopped making and painting their signs
Never stopped fighting to gain voting rights
And when met with a pale opposing crowd
They raised their voices twice as loud
Nothing would stop them, not even their fear
They continued their fight, right up to the year
Of 1965
When a fateful rally was planned
To march the highway from Selma to
A piece of Montgomery land
Though their protest was peaceful
Bloody Sunday still did raze
And by state troopers meant to protect
they were beaten, gassed, and tazed
But despite the attacks the protesters
Would not be scared away
They continued their highway march
To span all of 3 days
Through this injustice they fought back
And they were paid off with
The Voting Rights Acts
The war was won in August of 1965
When colored woman across the nation
Were able to set down their signs
When they stepped off the streets and to
The polling place formed lines
When they stood together and said
“The right to vote is mine”
Suffrage Art Description - by Stephanie Amanze
My piece is a rendition of the famous abolitionist and woman's suffragist, Sojourner Truth's portrait. I used alcohol markers, colored pencils, a Sharpie, white gel pens, and Pigma Micron pens as my medium on a 12"x12" mixed media sheet of paper. I chose to draw Sojourner Truth as my entry because she is one of the most renowned and well-known women suffragists in 19th century America and was at the head of my two favorite social justice movements in American history: the abolitionist movement and the women's rights movement. Sojourner's silhouette is outlined in red with white stripes going through it because the color red often symbolizes courage and strength, two virtues Truth was known for, and the white stripes were added because white represents equality and Truth fought not only for the equality of black people but the equality of women as well. The women's suffrage movement is identified with the colors violet, white, and gold so I drew those colors going through Sojourner Truth. The abolitionist movement's logo is a black slave in handcuffs with the phase, "Am I not a man and a brother?" written on a banner underneath the slave. To incorporate her
involvement with the abolitionist movement and give it a twist of femininity as well, I changed the
phrase by altering the male pronouns to female pronouns: "Am I not a woman and a sister?" This
allowed me to show the alliance between these two movements and how Truth was the mediator. In the white space of my drawing, I decided to write the most famous speech Sojourner gave in her career as an activist: The "And Ain't I A Woman?" speech she gave in 1851 at the Women's Right Convention in Akron, Ohio. This was very influential in the women's suffrage movement as is showed how the movement was failing black women at the time and only catering to white women. She signified this by asking the question, “And Ain't I A Woman?” many times in her speech. On the border on my piece, I wrote years that had significant events in Sojourner's life that I felt needed to be included. (In 1797 she was born. In 1826 she finally escaped slavery after being sold 4 times. In 1843 she changes her name from Isabella Baumfree to Sojourner Truth. In 1846 she officially joins the abolitionist movement. In 1850 she was one of the many famous attendees at the first women's
suffragist convention in Worcester, Massachusetts. In 1851 she gives her "And Ain't I A Woman?" speech. In 1867 she creates a program to help ex-slaves and lastly, in 1883 she dies in Michigan at 86 years old.) Finally, I colored in the border with royal blue because blue symbolizes legacy. Sojourner Truth left a royal legacy that exemplifies the progress of women and black Americans today.
Historical Tidbit:
One of Brockton's Oldest Voters

On November 6, 1956, Stanley Bauman took this picture of one of Brockton's oldest voters, Mrs. Alice L. Leonard, 91, of 366 Rockland Street who went to the polls vote for Eisenhower. Born in 1866, Mrs. Leonard was granted the right to vote at the age of 54. This picture was of the last presidential election she would vote in as she died in 1959. The first state primary which women could vote in was held on September 7,1920 and then in the national election held on November 4, 1920. www.facebook.com/BaumanCollection
The Search For An Internship During COVID

By Sasha Rockwell When my Junior year at Bridgewater State University started in the Fall of 2019, I knew it was the perfect time to take advantage of learning opportunities on and off-campus. But I didn't expect it to go the way it did.

Read more
buzzaround.info
Writing Internships available at the BuzzAround
Buildings Remain Closed to the Public
City Hall
45 School St
 508-580-7123

Check the city website for important updates

Brockton Public Library
Main Library - 304 Main St. 508-580-7890
East Branch - 54 Kingman St. 508-580-7892
West Branch - 540 Forest Ave. 508-580-7894


Council on Aging 
 10 Father Kenney Way 508-580-7811
Email coa@cobma.us & phone contact only

There are 13 food pantries in Brockton.
PRIZE BOX TRIVIA
Here at the BuzzAround we have a great time giving away prizes!

Congratulations!
Carole Smudin
won a $20 gift certificate to Color Street
nail polish strips
from independent consultant Katie Ray.


Play our
Historical Tidbit Trivia Game
at the bottom of this newsletter.

You could win a
Shungite pendant worth $25 from Queen Dawn Spirit
MassHire Greater Brockton YouthWorks End of the Summer Showcase: Developing a Social Media Marketing Plan Projects Showcase

Monday Aug 31st
11a - 12:30p
Come and join us on the last summer showcase session and learn something new! Its family friendly so make sure you bring your mom to!

Zoom ID is: 886 5535 7776
Login in 5 minutes in advance. See you there!

Brockton Lion's Club Raffle Winner!

The Brockton Lions Club congratulates our Texas Roadhouse Fundraiser raffle winner.....Lisa Marie!!!
Thank you for supporting the Brockton Lions Club fundraiser at Texas Roadhouse.....hope to see you again in September!

State Primary Voting

In-person voting will take place Tuesday September 1st at your nearest polling location from 7a - 8p Follow the link to find the poll locations. Brockton Poll Locations.

Any questions please contact
elections@cobma.us or call 508-580-7117
BrPL ArtSmart 2020

Voting here will be live from August 31st 9a to September 4th at 4p

Read more
buzzaround.info
Lighting Up the Sky in Brockton

Tee Eye Em took this still from a video they shot of a lightning strike on August 23rd in Brockton. It lit up the sky in a display of red while the sun began to set.

Photo credit: Tee Eye Em
Story credit: Sasha Rockwell
The 2020 Book for Business & COVID-19 Recovery Resource Guide 
 
Easy & Accessible with great resources!

  • Area Dining
  • COVID-19 Recovery Resources
  • Business Development Resources

Metro South Chamber of Commerce Works For YOU!
A Donation to Brockton Fire and Safety

Ocean State Job lot made a generous donation of PPE and equipment to assist us in the fight against COVID. They donated:
1600 KN95 Masks
3000 Surgical Masks
20 Gallons of hand sanitizer
10 face shields
15 infrared non-contact thermometers.
Thank you.

On September 1st, 2020, #WeMakeEvents,
a coalition of trade bodies, businesses, unions, and live events workers, will light up their venues, homes, and cities red in over 1,500 locations across North America to raise public and media awareness in support.
HOW CAN I HELP?
***Share your story about what live events mean to you:
***Light up your home, porch, apartment, etc. — be sure to take photos and share on social media!
To help your local businesses with another round of PPP and low interest loans, please show your support.
ARNONE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Power Scholars Academy Celebration 8-5-20
Video Courtesy of Brockton Community Access
#MASKUPMA

I’m joining @MassGovernor & @MassDPH to keep Massachusetts safe. It’s time to #MaskUpMA!
Dance Theater of New England
Dance Theater of New England is excited to announce DTNE’s Educational Hub!

Dance Theater of New England has the physical space during the day that will allow students in grades 1-5 a safe and supervised remote learning area. 

Limited to only 30 students!
To reserve your spot please email missdeb@dancetheaterofnewengland.com or call at (508) 697-5255.
Visit
for more information
QUEEN DAWN SPIRIT
Manifesting in the Present & Future in 2020

• Spiritual Healer • Certified Reiki Master Teacher • Past Life Regression & Future Life Progression Therapist • Officiant
Abington MA
(781) 428-4479
Lambda Kappa Sigma Voter Education Series Parts 1 & 2
Videos Courtesy of Brockton Community Access
Fill out the 2020 Census Here

When you respond to the census, your answers are kept anonymous. They are used only to produce statistics. The U.S. Census Bureau is bound by law to protect your answers and keep them strictly confidential. The law ensures that your...

Read more
2020census.gov
WEEKLY TRIVIA GAME

Have fun with us and bee entered to win a Shungite pendant worth $25 from
Queen Dawn Spirit.



Historical Tidbit Question:

How old was Alice Leonard when she voted for the first time?


Email us your answer at: 


Please include your name, phone number with your answer.


By entering, you give us permission to print your name in next week's Buzz Around.

 
On September 3, 2020 we will randomly pick a winner from the correct answers.
The Buzz Around is brought to you this week by: Jen Bellody, Janice O'Brien, Jacquelyn Rose, Kayla Rose, & Sebastian Ladoulis
Copyright 2020 Buzz Around Brockton. You have our permission to share and copy this issue in its entirety or as much as you like. If you take it in part, please give credit: ("Buzz Around Brockton 8/30/20").

Disclaimer: At the Buzz Around, we promote community and family. links to town committees and non-profit groups provide a way of sharing local information. Individual groups are responsible for how they represent themselves on their websites and in their promotional materials.
The Buzz Around does not claim to support any particular view.
We celebrated the 100th Anniversary of Woman's right to vote this week. The theme: "Forward Into Light."

Our daughters now learn that a woman's place is where ever her imagination takes her! Thank you, courageous women who went before us! To commemorate, and to remind us it can take to much time to get things right: It bears repeating: here is the winner of BrPL's Suffrage Poetry Contest: Melody Rivas

What About Me?

The war was not won in 1920
Yet there were still white women aplenty
Dropping their signs, leaving the streets, raising their voices to whoop with glee
Drowning out the frantic colored cries of
“What about me?”
The war was not won in 1930
Many women were left still yearning
To vote right next to their fair skinned peers,
To get what they had been denied for years
Their voices were silenced their ballots were empty
But they did not stop in 1920
The war was not won in 1950
but there was no time to waste on pity
American women from all shades of life
Natives, Hispanics, and Blacks alike
Never stopped making and painting their signs
Never stopped fighting to gain voting rights
And when met with a pale opposing crowd
They raised their voices twice as loud
Nothing would stop them, not even their fear
They continued their fight, right up to the year
Of 1965
When a fateful rally was planned
To march the highway from Selma to
A piece of Montgomery land
Though their protest was peaceful
Bloody Sunday still did raze
And by state troopers meant to protect
they were beaten, gassed, and tazed
But despite the attacks the protesters
Would not be scared away
They continued their highway march
To span all of 3 days
Through this injustice they fought back
And they were paid off with
The Voting Rights Acts
The war was won in August of 1965
When colored woman across the nation
Were able to set down their signs
When they stepped off the streets and to
The polling place formed lines
When they stood together and said
“The right to vote is mine”
American society is learning to respect all human beings. As everyone is invited to collaborate equally, our lives will only get better. We have huge amounts of talent ready to shine!!!
Have a great week, everyone! ~ Jacquie