November 2018 Newsletter
Healing the earth, one yard at a time.
Upcoming Programs and Events
Tennessee Valley Chapter
Annual Meeting
Saturday, November 3, 10:00am - 2:00pm
McCoy Farm & Gardens
Signal Mountain TN
Members-only, including spouses & partners

Native Seed and Plant Swap.
FREE Lunch.
Election of officers for 2019.
Preview of 2019 programs & events.
Tour the pollinator gardens at McCoy Farm.
Pre-registration is required (FREE).
Holiday Social & Potluck
Monday, December 10, 6:00pm
green|spaces
63 E. Main St., Chattanooga TN
FREE
Members-only, including spouses & partners

Bring a dish to share.
We'll provide beer, wine and other beverages.

So that we know how many people to expect, please register in advance.
News From Our Chapter
Would you like to have YOUR garden on one of our Landscapes in Progress programs?
This is a great opportunity to have a group of other Wild Ones members
visit YOUR garden and share experiences in gardening with native plants.

Just let us know when you'd like to have visitors, and we'll handle the rest.
We Have a NEW Web Address!
Visit Us and Bookmark
TNValleyWildOnes.org
We have a new website and a new address -- TNValleyWildOnes.org.

The new site has new content and easier access to native plant lists and other information that will help you garden with native plants. There's an updated list of places to buy native plants. All of our upcoming programs are now listed under the Programs & Events tab. And there are easy links to join, renew your membership and volunteer to help.

In the near future, we'll be adding a blog with plant information and other tips and observations about the native plant gardening and the natural world.
Tennessee Wildflowers App
In response to emails and app reviews by our members, the developer of the Tennessee Wildflowers app for phones has now added the native/non-native feature to the Apple version of the app. It was formerly only on the Google play version of the app. Our thanks to Donna Edwards for researching the name and email of the developer and posting it on our Facebook Group page for us.
Clear the Shelves Sale
The national office of Wild Ones is offering a variety of merchandise at discounted prices. Orders will be accepted via email beginning at 12:01 AM on November 5, giving you time to review what’s available. Please note that limited quantities are available, and orders will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis based on the time the emails are received.

Photo by Chris Tanis
at Rainbow Lake in October 2018.
Join Our Nature Journaling Group!
The Nature Journaling Meetup group gets together from 9:30-11:30am on Tuesdays, outdoors in clear weather, indoors or under a pavilion in rain, to spend time in nature. Locations vary each week.

You are free to pursue whatever creative outlet you desire, whether that be writing, drawing, painting or something else. Sharing what you do is your option. This is not a group designed to provide instruction or feedback, but rather a group encouraging each other to set aside personal creative time in nature.
Certificate in Native Plants
Coneflower
The Certificate in Native Plants program is designed to expand students' knowledge of botany, ecology, conservation, and uses of native flora in the southeastern United States. Students will get both classroom education and hands-on application to increase knowledge and skills that can be applied at home, in the community, and at work. The course setting will provide a common ground for native plant enthusiasts to meet and connect with others who share their interests. 

The CNP is designed to benefit both home gardeners and landscaping professionals alike. You do NOT need to be working toward the Certificate in order to register for classes.

Most CNP classes are limited to 25 participants. They fill up quickly, so register now to ensure your place.  

Instructor: Wyn Miller 
Saturday, November 10, 2018 
9 am - 4 pm EST 
Reflection Riding Arboretum & Nature Center


Registration for 2019 classes will be open soon!
Interesting Information
Virginia Creeper is for the Birds

Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) is at its showiest in autumn. The leaves of this native vine turn bright scarlet, a perfect offset for its ripening fruit. It’s especially striking where it has found a platform to climb.

Muhly Madness

In the world of ornamental grasses, pink muhly grass ( Muhlenbergia capillaris ) is getting a lot of attention these days...now is the time to notice it in landscapes as its tall spires of pale to deep pink inflorescences wave in the breeze.

'Hyperalarming' Study Shows
Massive Insect Loss


Insects around the world are in a crisis, according to a small but growing number of long-term studies showing dramatic declines in invertebrate populations. A  new report  suggests that the problem is more widespread than scientists realized.

Gardening for Native Bees.
An Interview
with Heather Holm.

Heather is an award-winning author, a widely-recognized advocate and educator for native bee conservation, and a speaker at our Plant Natives 2018! Symposium. She responded to some written questions for this blog. 

Local Events of Interest

November 3, 2018
Reflection Riding, Chattanooga TN


November 8, 2018
The Camp House, Chattanooga TN


EarthCare Fall Workshop
November 17, 2018
Greenway Farm, Chattanooga TN

Photos from the Field
On Mike's morning walk last week, there were numerous orb weaver spider webs
along his neighbor’s fence-line, but only one web
still had its chilled owner in the center of the web.
It was 40 degrees outside. 
 Photo by Mike O'Brien.


Swamp Sunflower (Helianthus augustifolius) in bloom in early October.
Photo by Mike O'Brien.


Hearts-a-Bustin' or Strawberry Bush (Euonymus americanus).
Photo by Mike O'Brien.


Autumn Meadowhawk Dragonfly
This one is a male, with its red abdomen with a few black marks on its posterior most abdominal segments and its red eyes. The female is yellowish without any red. The legs of both sexes are uniformly pale and they like to perch on railings, vegetation, leaves etc., thus making them almost invisible because of their relatively small size and quiet nature. Size is 1.0-1.4 inches. Similar species are Ruby Meadowhawks and Blue-faced Meadowhawks. 
Photo by Mike O'Brien
Stay Connected

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