PROFESSOR FRANK RUDY COOPER

I became a law professor to explore the question of how men of color are policed.  I had to think about whiteness because of the composition of police forces, and masculinities given the overwhelmingly male population they suspect of crime. While I have generally focused on police stop and frisk, I am now considering more broadly how all forms of policing fit into contemporary racial and gender ideologies.
 
Colonization By Policing:  Critiquing Programmatic Stop and Frisk , Mich. J. Race & L. (forthcoming, 2017)
 
Always-Already Suspect:  Revising Vulnerability Theory, 93 N. C. L. Rev. 1339 (2015)
 
ASSOCIATE DEAN LEAH CHAN GRINVALD

My research agenda is focused on the enforcement of intellectual property laws, both domestically and internationally. In particular, I am concerned with the ways that intellectual property rights holders may over-enforce their rights, often to the detriment of small businesses, start-ups, individuals, and entrepreneurs.

Charitable Trademarks, 50 Akron L. Rev. 817 (2017)  

Contracting Trademark Fame?, 47 Loy. Univ. Chi. L.J. 1291 (2016)  
 
PROFESSOR HILARY ALLEN
 
My research stresses that financial stability is vital for the world's economic well-being, and explores the financial products, institutions and regulators that can impact financial stability.  Recently, I have been considering the potential impact of new technological developments ("fintech") on financial stability, and how regulation can adapt to cope with these innovations.
 
The SEC as Financial Stability Regulator, J. Corp. L (forthcoming, 2017)

$ = € = Bitcoin?, 76 Md. L. Rev. 877 (2017)
 
CLINICAL PROFESSOR SARAH BOONIN

My scholarship and popular commentary investigates the interaction between public health laws and policies and the daily lives of marginalized communities. The work is diverse, covering reproductive health law, LGBT rights, and disability law, and is influenced by my clinical practice. My most recent piece explores Social Security's treatment of surviving divorced spouses, and its implications on survivors of domestic violence.

Ten Years Too Long-Reforming Social Security's Marriage Duration Requirement in Cases of Domestic Violence, 39 Harv. J.L. & Gender 369 (2016) 
 
PROFESSOR JOHN INFRANCA

I'm focused on urban law, land use regulation, affordable housing policy, property theory, and law and religion.  My current research projects examine implications of the sharing economy for urban law and policy, regulatory challenges for new forms of housing, and communitarian understandings of religious liberty and property.
 
(Communal) Life, (Religious) Liberty, and Property , Mich. St. L. Rev. (forthcoming, 2017)
 
The Sharing Economy as an Urban Phenomenon (with Nestor Davidson), 34 Yale L. & Pol'y Rev. 215 (2016) 
 
PROFESSOR DAVID YAMADA

My scholarship on workplace bullying, unpaid internships, and therapeutic jurisprudence is grounded in the practice of intellectual activism. This means that interdisciplinary research and analysis should lead to specific law reform proposals, followed by active involvement to advance these ideas in the public sphere and among legal and policy stakeholders.

The Legal and Social Movement Against Unpaid Internships, 8 N.E. U. L.J. 357
(2016)

Intellectual Activism and the Practice of Public Interest Law, 25 S. Cal. Rev. L. & Soc. Just. 127 (2016)
   
PROFESSOR STEVEN FERREY

My scholarship currently focuses on recent Supreme Court Supremacy and Commerce Clause decisions transforming state/federal authority controlling regulation of energy, environment, and climate. It has been cited recently by the Seventh Circuit and Judge Posner as authoritative. My 3-volume Law of Independent Power (43rd edition 2017) is a widely used treatise on these subjects.
 
The Poles of Power , 8 Geo. Wash. J. Energy & Envtl L. 39 (2017) 
 
The Medium is the Message , 35 Va. Envtl. L. J., 213 (2017)

PROFESSOR MICHAEL RUSTAD

A Georgetown Law Journal article credits me with creating a social justice theory of tort law with Ralph Nader and several law professors. My empirical studies of social media, consumer arbitration, globalized Internet law and tort damages have been widely cited by courts, policymakers, and the popular press.

SOFTWARE LICENSING, CLOUD COMPUTING AGREEMENTS, OPEN SOURCE, AND INTERNET TERMS OF USE: A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO INFORMATION AGE CONTRACTS IN A GLOBAL SETTING (Matthew Bender, 2016-2017)

Reconceptualizing the Right to Be Forgotten to Enable Transatlantic Data Flow (with Sanna Kulveska), 28 Harv. J. L. & Tech. 349 (2015)
 
RESEARCH PROFESSOR KATHLEEN ENGEL

My research centers on financial services markets, with a particular focus on mortgage finance and regulation, subprime and predatory lending, consumer credit, student loans, housing markets, and housing discrimination. My approach incorporates law, institutional analysis, economics, and policy, often with the purpose of identifying the best means to protect consumers and the larger economy. 
 
Local Governments and Risky Home Loans, 69 S.M.U. L. Rev 609 (2016)
 
Can Consumer Law Solve the Problem of Complexity in U.S. Consumer Credit Products?, CREDIT, CONSUMERS AND THE LAW: AFTER THE GLOBAL STORM (Routledge 2016)    

PROFESSOR JEFFREY LIPSHAW

Drawing on long experience in the business world, I write about strengths and limitations of lawyerly rationality, particularly in the transactional setting. I call on a diversity of disciplines - philosophy, artificial intelligence, complexity, and metaphor theory - to explore how business lawyers navigate the overlap between law and business.

BEYOND LEGAL REASONING: A CRITIQUE OF PURE LAWYERING (Routledge, 2017)

Lexical Opportunism and the Limits of Contract Theory, 84 U. Cin. L. Rev. 217 (2016) 
 

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