COVID-19 BUILDING INDUSTRY UPDATES
GOVERNOR ISSUES NEW EXECUTIVE ORDER TO REOPEN MORE TEXAS BUSINESSES
Today, Texas Governor Greg Abbott announced the second phase of reopening businesses in Texas. Under the second phase, restaurants may increase their occupancy to 50% and additional services and activities that remained closed under Phase I may open with restricted occupancy levels and minimum standard health protocols.
 
In updating his previous order, office-based employers may open with the greater of ten or less individuals or 25% of the total office workforce. These individuals must maintain appropriate social distancing. Also as previously reported, gyms, exercise facilities, and exercise classes may also open today, but must operate at 25% occupancy. Non-essential manufacturing services may also open, but facilities must limit their occupancy to 25%.
 
Also, effective immediately, all childcare facilities, youth clubs like Boy and Girl Scouts, massage and personal-care and beauty services like electrolysis, tattoo and piercing studios, and hair loss treatment are eligible to open or hold meetings while maintaining health protocols.  
 
Beginning Friday, May 22, restaurants will be able to operate at 50% capacity. Bars, bingo halls, bowling alleys and aquariums will be able to open at 25% capacity. Effective Friday, May 29, zoos will be able to open at 25% capacity.
 
In addition, on May 31, day and overnight youth camps and youth sports will be able to resume. Also on May 31, professional sports such basketball, baseball, car racing, football, golf, softball, and tennis can hold events without in-person spectators.
 
And by June, in-person summer school can resume, so long as school districts follow social distancing practices and the state’s health protocols.
 
See here for checklists and instructions on how businesses should reopen. 
 
Is COVID-19 compensable under workers’ compensation laws? The answer to that question isn’t a simple yes or no. It depends on your state’s workers’ compensation laws.

There is guidance available from other organizations and states that have addressed this issue:

  • The National Council on Compensation Insurance says that “while workers compensation laws provide compensation for ‘occupational diseases’ that arise out of and in the course of employment, many state statutes exclude ‘ordinary diseases of life’ (e.g., the common cold or flu).”
Two webinars from NAHB Education – on May 21 and June 3 – will explore different aspects of home building and the housing industry as the world adjusts to a new reality in the wake of COVID-19. Both are free to NAHB members. Read more
TODAY'S WEBINAR WITH PATRICK JANKOWSKI RECORDING NOW AVAILABLE

Did you miss our webinar with Patrick Jankowski, Senior Vice President of Research and Regional Economist at the Greater Houston Partnership today? Recording is now available.
For more visit ghba.org/covid19