Hispanic Center E-Update
December 21, 2016
Season's greetings from the National Research Center on Hispanic Children & Families! We wish you a joyous holiday season y un próspero Año Nuevo.
2016 Year in Review

In case you missed them, check out some of our top briefs and data tools from the past year:

  • A National Portrait of Hispanic Children in Need examines the circumstances of the 11.1 million Hispanic children living in or near poverty. It also estimates the proportion of these children being served by some of the social service programs intended for them. Be sure to check out the accompanying infographic!

Highlights from the Field
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Call for Papers:  Early Care and Education among Latino Families
This special issue of Early Childhood Research Quarterly invites manuscripts that examine access, utilization and impacts of ECE for Latino children and their families in the U.S. The special issue grows out of work conducted by the National Center for Research on Hispanic Children & Families, funded by the Administration for Children and Families within the Department of Health and Human Services. The editors invite papers featuring original quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods research, as well as review articles focused on these topics. Manuscripts should be submitted between February 1 and June 1, 2017. A detailed description of the call for papers is available here.
State(s) of Head Start
The National Institute for Early Education Research’s (NIEER) State(s) of Head Start is the first report to examine Head Start enrollment, quality, duration, and funding state-by-state, focusing on the 2014–2015 program year, but also providing historical data back to 2007. Quality preschool can greatly benefit low-income children and families, yet the report's findings suggest that the three states with the greatest numbers of Latino residents fell below national averages on enrollment and other measures. 

State Sociodemographic Portraits of Immigrant and U.S.-Born Parents of Young Children
The Migration Policy Institute’s National Center on Immigrant Integration Policy just released a series of fact sheets that provide key sociodemographic characteristics of native- and foreign-born parents of young children in states with the largest number of immigrant families. The fact sheets accompany a national report, Serving Immigrant Families Through Two-Generation Programs: Identifying Family Needs and Responsive Program Approaches, which examines a number of two-generation programs aimed at immigrant and refugee parents—who together make up almost a quarter of all U.S. parents with young children.
  We Want to Hear From You!
  You can reach us @NRCHispanic or via email at info@HispanicResearchCenter.org Also, join our LinkedIn group !