February 2018 - IAPE Monthly Newsletter

Ask Joe...
Each month, IAPE's primary instructor, Joe Latta, answers one of your questions. Consider writing us if you have a question that needs an answer. We would love to hear from you.
 
To submit a question for Joe  Contact Us

Dear Joe,

We are continuously receiving substantial amounts of drug cases that may be tainted with fentanyl. Can you recommend any good resource of the handling of fentanyl when it comes to the property room?

Thank you,
R. Danger

Dear R. Danger,

One good place to start at on the  IAPE website . We have attempted to include any resource material that comes our way.  We receive last we received a great training aid regarding the use of a fume hood with the handling of fentanyl.  Our thanks goes to the Evidence Manager, Bob Martin,  at the Seminole County Sheriff's Office Forensic Laboratory. Included in this recent document is training materials for the use of a fume hood in the property room, packaging, and decontamination.

Regards,
 
Joe Latta
Executive Director


HEADLINE of the MONTH
Tell Me This Isn't True
February 8, 2018

Botched investigation: Body overlooked for 49 days in van on police property 

MEMPHIS, Tenn. - FOX13 has new information about what happened the night Memphis police officers overlooked a shooting victim.
 
Investigators told FOX13 no one has came forward to identify the body found.   MPD hopes that a loved one, family member, friend, or anyone will contact police or file a missing persons report regarding the victim.
 
Memphis police policy gives officers instructions on what to do to search for evidence at a crime scene. Instructions that could have help officers find another victim in the back of a van involved in aggravated assault last December. "It is absolutely embarrassing," said Mike Collins, a retired Shelby County Sheriff's deputy.
 
Collins told FOX13 there is no excuse why Memphis police did not find another victim inside the back of a van after the owner had been shot.
Collins said, "I fail to understand how this could have possibly happened, so many errors."
 
FOX13 obtained the Memphis Police Department's Policy and Procedure. We discovered three stages where the police had the opportunity to search the van thoroughly. The first chance was when the officers arrived at the scene. According to the policy for search and seizure, an officer can search a vehicle if they "believe that contraband or evidence can be found." The next opportunity was when detectives arrived.
 
According to the policy for Security of Crime Scenes, "the investigating officer will take responsibility for the investigation" and "assume responsibility for all physical evidence."
 
Collins looked at print outs of the manual and said, "There is a break down, a serious break down in communication between the officers on the scene and the investigators."
 
The third safety net should have happened when the bullet riddled and bloodied van was towed to the impound lot.
The MPD "Tow in Policy" states, "When there is probable cause to believe that the vehicle was used in the commission of a crime or contains evidence, the vehicle may be legally searched."
Collins believes searching and taking an inventory of items in the van once it reached the tow lot should have been mandatory.
 
"That vehicle should have been searched. One way or another, that vehicle should have been searched," said Collins. We asked Collins what should a patrolman do when arriving on the scene of someone who had been shot in their car or van.
"First you want to render aid to that person that's injured," answered Collins. "Just simply look in the back seat. These are just cursory type searches because you want to make sure you don't have any other victims."
 
Collins said it is important to search the entire vehicle because in some cases either a victim or a suspect may be trying to hide, but he added, "It is not that hard to find a human body inside of a vehicle."
MPD policy states an investigator can be called in to supervise a search or help conduct a more extensive one.
"If it requires them to look for contraband and other evidence of a particular crime, for example, shell casings," said Collins.
 
By the time the vehicle is towed the impound lot, Collins said t
hat is when police can do an extensive search and document what they found.
 
With a search warrant, they can check compartments, pull back tarps and other items that can uncover evidence and victims. "There is a difference between finding an ounce of marijuana versus a human body," Collins said. He told us by making inventory of the items found in car, it protects the MPD from any false claim of theft.

Commentary: We don't know what to say!!!! 

Photos of the Month
Good Lockers
Self-Locking
Bad Lockers
Keys can be lost or duplicated and
all lockers same size

 





tracker

Property Room
FileONq

Spacesaver



2018 Classes 

March 13 - 14, 2017
Class Full - Wait List

March 28 - 29, 2018
Class Full - Wait List

April 4 - 5, 2018
5 Seats Left

Northbrook, IL
April 11 - 13, 2018

April 17 - 18, 2018

May 9 - 10, 2018
9 Seats Left

May 15 - 16, 2018
17 Seats Left

May 22 - 23, 2018
14 Seats Left

June 6 - 7, 2018

June 20 - 21, 2018

June 26 - 27, 2018

 July 17 - 18, 2018
13 Seats Left

 July 30 - 31, 2018

August 13 - 14, 2018

August 21 - 22, 2018

August 28 - 29, 2018

September 11 - 12, 2018

September 25 - 26, 2018

October 2 - 3, 2018

October 16 - 17, 2018

December 4 - 5, 2018

Classes Still Being Planned 
 in 2018

November
Portland, OR

Can't Travel?
IAPE also offers
ONLINE TRAINING

Save money on lodging, meals
and transportation.
To learn more about the IAPE's  ONLINE TRAINING 
or to register please visit:
 
Call for details on
 sponsoring a class!
   

Be On The Look Out in 2018
IAPE is proud to announce the  one-day Property and Evidence Management training class for SUPERVISORS, which has been developed for anyone that is assuming the responsibility of the property and evidence unit. 

Date: TBD 2018
Location: TBD 2018


IAPE Property & Evidence Room Accreditation
Increase your value!
IAPE Property and Evidence Room Accreditation© is available for all law enforcement agencies who have responsibility for property and evidence received and maintained in the normal scope of their operation.


Got a Job? 
Need a Job?
IAPE is delighted to announce that we have a new section for posting a job announcement or checking job opportunities.