INGRAM GALLERY | Autumn 2021
Greetings!

The harmony of Autumn arrives with a richness of art and gallery news for all.
 
In this edition of Ingram Art News, we speak with Jane Everett while in the midst of numerous career achievements about her newest works. The conversation takes us to the southern interior of British Columbia as we get to connect with the artist's enchanting worldview. We continue with a look at the Toronto Star's front page news regarding E.B. Cox's Garden of the Greek Gods followed by an exploration of magnificent new oils by Steven Volpe that have arrived at the gallery.
 
We look forward to seeing you and sharing in artful conversation. Contact us for further details about any of the artists and estates we work alongside or for a catalogue of available pieces.

JANE EVERETT Red Osier I, 2021 - oil on board, 16 x 20 inches

JANE EVERETT | In Conversation

In the middle of a number of significant artistic accomplishments, we share a conversation with Jane Everett about the Shuswap in British Columbia, the artist's cultivated process, and her newest Onyx Creek works. Exploring the riparian environments where water meets land, Everett increasingly blurs the line between reality and the abstract in ways that offer refreshing and engaging visions of life and the worlds around us.
 
Can you tell us about the setting of Onyx Creek?
 
Everett: We have a cabin on the north shore of the Shuswap (a body of lakes at the top of the Okanagan valley), and Onyx Creek is about a two and a half kilometre paddle along the shoreline from where we are.
 
In the Spring, when the melt comes, the lake rises somewhere between 8 – 12 feet. This water feeds into the Columbia river system, which feeds everything to California...  It's a huge amount of water that comes up. On the shore where the mouth of Onyx Creek joins into the lake, there are all these willows and they are flooded. So you're paddling amongst the greenery and the light is not just coming from overhead – it's coming up from the water. You get this incredible effect.
 
That sounds like a perfect environment for your work...
 
Everett: I'm mainly a painter of light, and this is a place where it's very intense – your experience of light.  
 
Everybody knows that feeling of going to the lake or the ocean, and the sunlight's on the water, and you get that feeling of euphoria. I don't know why we get that... I think it must be some atavistic reaction we have to light on water – that it's good for us.
 
Do your compositions change a lot from field to studio?
 
Everett: I usually start with a photograph on my cell phone – lousy photographs have always worked better for me than good ones... If I start that way, I have this connection of where to go and I'm establishing the composition in that process.
 
You can do a bad painting with a good composition, but you can't do a good painting with a bad composition. It's the basic decisions you have to start making at the beginning.

Your paintings bring us to very real spaces, yet reality and abstraction are hard to distinguish...
 
Everett: I always want to paint more the experience than the actual landscape. It's not photography, it's not high realism... It's trying to hang onto how I felt at that very transient moment.

JANE EVERETT August I, 2020 - oil on canvas, 36 x 60 inches

In paintings like August I [above] – it's a lovely dance the eyes do between realistic flower petals and the abstract elements of the piece...
 
Everett: Well thank you very much. I think when you get some of those elements, your eye reads into other things where you're seeing water lilies or reflections of clouds on the surface of the water or whatever... You bring your own experience to it.
 
I think a painting really should be a conversation between the painting and the viewer. That's an important part of it.
 
August I and some of the paintings are also from the fire pond... Which, because of the huge change in water level at the Shuswap – if the fire trucks can't get to the water because of a rocky beach or a cliff or whatever – they dig manmade ponds where they fill up their trucks.
 
And then the pond fills up with water lilies and all sorts of water plants... It's just an amazing thing.
JANE EVERETT Tree Tops I, 2021 - charcoal on drafting film, 15.5 x 21 inches

Along with the oils of Onyx Creek, Everett has produced new charcoal works that present graphic depictions of the forest interior with ever-expanding artfulness. Everett’s attention to the woods of British Columbia was recently showcased in Nuit Blanche Saskatoon and continues in the artist's visual design for Ballet Kelowna’s upcoming production of Macbeth, premiering on May 6th and 7th of 2022 in Kelowna, BC.
 
Contact us for any further details, the artist's CV or for a catalogue of Everett's available oil paintings or charcoal drawings.
 
JANE EVERETT Pine with Red Buoy, 2021 - charcoal on drafting film, 18 x 24 inches

E.B. COX, R.C.A. (1914-2003)
The Garden of the Greek Gods

Toronto Star presented an article on the front page of their paper last week on Kathy Sutton and her efforts to free the late E.B. Cox's Garden of the Greek Gods at Exhibition Place. 
 
Since 2014, her father’s work has been locked away...privy only to club patrons and those who stole glimpses of the few smaller pieces externally visible through barred gates.

The article details how the artist's daughter engaged in a seven year battle to free the sculptures according to her father's intentions for the large-scale works to be accessible to the public. The narrative history of the limestone pieces is reinforced by Ingram Gallery's Jeff Duns and ultimately beams with anticipation for their future home in the Rose Garden of Exhibition Place in 2022. 

“…they’ll be exactly where Cox would want them to be, [Sutton] said, overlooking family picnics while children scale them.”

STEVEN VOLPE Birthday, 2021 - oil on canvas, 25 x 30 inches

Steven Volpe has delivered new oils to the gallery that are breathtaking on the walls. The dream-like scenes are filled with the artist's exquisite style and in-person viewers are often captivated by their eloquent brushwork.

Volpe was recently profiled by In The Hills magazine and art lovers will be excited to hear that the artist has an upcoming public solo exhibition at the Museum of Dufferin in the Spring of 2022.

Historical pieces are continually moving through the gallery as additions and acquisitions take place on a regular basis. We frequently connect art lovers and collectors with the artists that have their attention and our website’s historical pages offer a source of remarkable works from our illustrious past.

Please contact us for details on any artist and for catalogues of available works. We look forward to your next visit and sharing in the beautiful season ahead.

With all good wishes,

Tarah Aylward, Director   
Ingram Gallery
416-929-2220 
For the Love of Art | #AtTheGallery 

E. B. COX, R.C.A. (1914-2003) Twisting Male Torso - dolomite, 19 x 10 x 6.5 inches



BRIAN BURKE, R.C.A. (1952-2017) Cascando #5, 2014 - oil on canvas, 48 x 48 inches