June/July 2019, Vol. XIX, No 6
Honoring Our Seniors!
The Council’s Senior Recognition Luncheon was held April 24th, with over 140 coming together for a wonderful meal from McCoy’s Catering, inspiring words about service from featured speaker Xenia Mayor Sarah Mays, and presentation of the Leadership and Outstanding Senior awards to an impressive group of seniors.
 
Nine seniors were honored this year for their contributions to their senior centers and to the Greene County community. We continue to be humbled by the gifts of time, talent and energy that Greene County seniors share to make this community a better place to live. This year’s honorees once again have a number of things in common, including their commitment to their senior centers and other organizations they support, a willingness to do whatever is needed, no interest in recognition, and contagious and welcoming smiles. These wonderful seniors positively impact the lives of more people than we can begin to count and we thank them for their service.
 
It was a lovely and festive event, which included laughter, tears and surprises. We want to thank our Master of Ceremonies, Tony McIlvaine, for once again sharing his time, support and not-so-bad jokes and mental puzzles with us. Tony makes everyone feel special and we hope he knows how special he is to all of us.
 
Our congratulations to this year’s award winners who are pictured below, back row/front row: Mary Riggsby of Jamestown, Sue Roysden of Beavercreek, Jim Tabor of Fairborn, Geri Cooper of Clifton, Nellie Hicks of Cedarville, Deloris Willis of Xenia, Greene County Outstanding Senior Marlene Acus, Alice Caldwell of Spring Valley and Suzanne Patterson of Yellow Springs.
Special Thanks to our Table Sponsors:
 
Added Touch Cleaning
 Elmcroft of Fairborn
 Friends Care Community
 Harmony Center for Rehabilitation & Healing
 Legacy Village
 Preserve at Beavercreek
 Senior Helpers
 Village at the Greene
It's Your Money: Watch Out for Zombie Debt
When a company is unable to collect a debt and ‘writes it off,’ this does not mean that the debt has disappeared and you are off the hook. ‘Written off’ is an accounting term for tax purposes and has no impact on the obligation owed the creditor. ‘Zombie debt’ is old debt, generally past the statute of limitations, that has not had collection attempts made for a long time. When collection attempts restart — sometimes years later — it’s considered ‘resurrected.’ The Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) warns that “Even if the statute of limitations has expired, a court may still award a judgment against you if you don’t show up and raise the statute of limitations as your defense.” The onus is on the consumer to note that the statute of limitations has passed.
 
In Ohio, according to the Ohio Revised Code, the statute of limitations for written accounts is 8 years, 6 years for oral contracts and verbal agreements, 3 years for dishonored checks, and demand notes have a limitation of 6 years after the date on which the demand is made (or 10 years if no demand is made and neither principal nor interest has been paid over that time period).
 
The debt-buying industry then steps in, buying debts that have been written off. If you get a call from a collector, don’t just ignore it. If you speak to them, do not agree with anything the collector says, as it could be taken as an admission that you owe something. Find out their address, fax number, and ask for written proof of the debt. If you think that a debt might be time-barred, ask what their records show as the date of your last payment, which helps determine when the statute of limitations clock started. If a collector doesn't give you this information, send a letter within 30 days of receiving a written notice of the debt. State you are 'disputing' the debt and you want to 'verify' it. Collectors must stop trying to collect until they give you verification. Keep a copy of your letter and the verification you receive.
 
What should you do if you are sued for a time-barred debt? Defend yourself in court and consider talking to an attorney. You or your attorney should tell the judge that the debt is time-barred and, as proof, provide a copy of the verification from the collector or any information showing the date of your last payment. The lawsuit will be dismissed if the judge decides the debt is time-barred. In any case, don't ignore the lawsuit. If you do, the collector likely will get a court judgment against you, and possibly take money from your paycheck, bank account, or tax refund.
 
The decision to pay a time-barred debt is up to you. You have options, but each one has consequences. Consider talking to a lawyer before you choose an option.
 
·  Pay nothing on the debt. Although the collector may not sue you to collect the debt, you still owe it. The collector can continue to try to collect unless you send a letter to the collector demanding that communication stops. Not paying a debt may make it harder, or more expensive, to get credit, insurance, or other services because not paying may lower your credit rating.
· Make a partial payment. If you pay any amount on a time-barred debt, or even promise to pay, the debt is 'revived.' This means a new statute of limitations period begins. It also often means the collector can sue to collect the full debt amount, which may include additional interest and fees.
· Pay off the debt. Even though the collector may not be able to sue you, you may decide to pay off the debt. Some collectors may be willing to accept less than what is owed to settle, either one large payment of a series of small ones. Make sure you get a signed form or letter from the collector before you make any payment. This document should state that the entire debt is being settled, the amount, and that the amount to be paid will release you from any further obligation. Without this document, the amount paid may be treated as a partial payment instead of a complete payment. Keep a record of the payments you make to pay off the debt.
Annual Yard Sale - Rain or Shine!
Don't miss our anual yard sale:

GCCOA Yard Sale
Thursday & Friday, June 6th & 7th
9am-3pm
GCCOA parking lot
1195 W Second St, Xenia
(Across from Xenia Nazarene Church)

Categories include:
Household Items
Small Appliances
Small Furniture
Electronics
Clothing
Books
Crafts
Holiday & Other Décor
Gardening/Lawn Items

Plus tasty goodies - Homemade Brownies, Cookies, and Popcorn

Proceeds benefit the GCCOA Grab Bar Installation Program.
Express Your Creativity
Summer Creativity Expo
Thursday, June 20th
10:00am to 2:00pm
Xenia Community Center
1265 West Second Street
 
Greene County adults are invited to join us for the Summer Creativity Expo where you may choose two of four creative sessions to enjoy with fellow participants. Our patient session leaders will be ready to assist you with whatever help you may need. Supplies for the projects are provided, along with a grab ‘n’ go lunch, for the $5 registration.
 
Our projects are wood mosaic, hanging garden art, decoupage vases, and spun fiber hangings. Registration is required by June 11th. Brochures are available at the senior centers, the Council offices and on the Council’s website . You can also request a brochure by contacting the Council at 937-376-5486 or info@gccoa.org
Homemade Treats and Jam Fest
Wednesday, August 14th
4:00pm to 6:30pm
Xenia Community Center

Please join us for our annual fundraiser, with music by Mack and The Rockets, refreshments, homemade baked goods and other creations to buy in our Country Store, the Cloud Race Tourney with Announcer Paul Newman, Jr., and the unforgettable Homemade Treats & Jam Auction with Lee Duteil, auctioneer extraordinaire and his trusty sidekick, Ed Marrinan. Tickets are $10 and all proceeds are used for senior and caregiver programs and services. We will also have a pre-sale of select cookies/jams the first two weeks of August for those unable to attend. For more info, please check out our website.
D-Day: Freedom From Above Exhibit
In honor of the 75th Anniversary of D-Day, the Air Force Museum Foundation opened a new, highly interactive, augmented reality experience focusing on the 82nd and 101st Airborne division and their missions during D-Day. This limited-time exhibit utilizes easy-to-use tablets running an innovative technology, “HistoPad,” which immerses visitors in the history of Sainte M ère Église, Normandy, France, during the German Occupation, and its liberation in 1944.
 
Through spectacular historically-validated 360-degree recreations, in association with the Airborne Museum of Sainte M ère Église, visitors will travel in time to understand the key moments of the decisive battle and the success of D-Day. The new exhibit is located in Building 2, and will take approximately 40 minutes to tour.
 
The cost is $5 per tablet, and the generations can share. Give the grandkids the HistoPad and follow them as history comes alive. This is not a video game. This is real stories of real heroes. There are also some emotional memories for those old enough to remember, so you may choose to come alone to reflect on the bravery of the greatest generation.
 
On Thursday, June 6th, the National Museum of the US Air Force will honor the 75th Anniversary of D-Day with a day of events, starting at 9am and running through the movie “Sunken Roads: 70 Years After D-Day”, which starts at 6:30pm.
 
Admission to the National Museum of the US Air Force is always free. However there is a cost for the movies and the HistoPad tablet. Motorized carts are also free, on a first come, first served basis. For more info, visit www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/Upcoming/Events or call 937-255-3286 .
Donor Spotlight
Please join us in thanking these generous donors who shared a gift since the last newsletter. All donations are set aside to be used for future services/programs.

In Memory Of:
James Campise
Mable Shipe
Roberta Shiverdecker

In Honor Of:
Paul Shipe

Donors:
Linda Campise
Marlene Elliott
Fay & Richard Dunnigan
Mary Graves
Mary Hamer
Tony McIlvaine
Elana Shanks
Denise & Jeff Tye

Organizational Donors:
Added Touch Cleaning
Amazon Smile
Elmrcoft of Fairborn
Friends Care Community
Legacy Village
Preserves at Beavercreek
Rural King
Village at the Greene
Senior Helpers
Greene County Parks & Trails
Harmony Centers for Rehabilitation & Healing
Greene Memorial Hospital/Soin Medical Center
WBZI - Real Roots Radio
GCCOA Energizers Sharing Their Time & Talent:

Pat Beal
Phyllis Beck
David Cusack
Jerri DeVoe
Evelyn Ferguson
LB Fred
Betty Gibson
Gilbert Hamilton
John Hobson
Alforetta Hughes
Linda & Jim Jones
Letha Kimball
Genevieve Kroemer
Sarah Mays
Tony McIlvaine
Frannie McPherson
Marian Miller
Sharon Morgan
Foy Neff
Joe Radin
Ken Richardson
Pam Sowder
Priscilla Stephens
Ginny Vikmanis
Shawnah Tibbs-Sargent
Barb Werth

Senior Center Staff and Volunteers:
Beavercreek Senior Center
Cedarville Senior Center
Fairbonr Senior Center
Spring Valley Senior Center
Xenia Adult Recreation & Services Center
Yellow Springs Senior Center
Bellbrook Senior Center
Jamestown Senior Center
Upcoming Programs & Meetings
GCCOA Yard Sale & Baked Goods Sale
Thursday & Friday, June 6th & 7th ~ 9am to 3pm
GCCOA Office, 1195 W. Second St, Xenia
 
Memory Loss, Dementia & Alzheimer’s Disease
Thursday, July 11th ~ 6:00pm to 8:00pm
GCCOA Office, 1195 W. Second St, Xenia
 
Medicare 101
Wednesday, June 12th ~ 3:30pm to 5pm
Council’s Beavercreek Office, 1221 Meadow Bridge Dr., Suite C
 
GCCOA Annual Luncheon Meeting
Tuesday, June 18th ~ 12:30pm
Xenia Nazarene Church
 
Summer Creativity Expo
Thursday, June 20th ~ 10:00am to 2:00pm
Xenia Community Center (next to GCCOA Office) 1265 W. Second St, Xenia

For more information about these and other GCCOA programs/events,
please contact the Council at 937-376-5486 or info@gccoa.org  

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Greene County Council on Aging
937-376-5486
Committed to Seniors and Caregivers
Our mission: To promote independence and quality of life for Greene County senior citizens and caregivers by facilitating and supporting the development, implementation and continual improvement of a comprehensive and coordinated system of contact and care.