** From The Positive Perspective **
June, 2022
Positive Self-Talk vs. Negative Self-Talk

It is an understatement to say that we have all had to adjust to changes in the last couple of years. We had no choice in many circumstances, but we do have a choice in how we look at that change. If we look at changes with negative thinking, we create stress for ourselves. If we look at that change with positive thinking, we can help reduce that stress.
 
An article from the Mayo Clinic staff published some great ideas to keep in mind when thinking about the way we look at change and other life situations. We may not be able to control what gets thrown at us, but we can choose how we look at it. 
 
Enjoy!!
 
Positive thinking helps with stress management and can even improve your health. Practice overcoming negative self-talk with examples provided.

Is your glass half-empty or half-full? How you answer this age-old question about positive thinking may reflect your outlook on life, your attitude toward yourself, and whether you're optimistic or pessimistic — and it may even affect your health.
Indeed, some studies show that personality traits such as optimism and pessimism can affect many areas of your health and well-being. The positive thinking that usually comes with optimism is a key part of effective stress management. And effective stress management is associated with many health benefits. If you tend to be pessimistic, don't despair — you can learn positive thinking skills.


Understanding positive thinking and self-talk

Positive thinking doesn't mean that you ignore life's less pleasant situations. Positive thinking just means that you approach unpleasantness in a more positive and productive way. You think the best is going to happen, not the worst.

Positive thinking often starts with self-talk. Self-talk is the endless stream of unspoken thoughts that run through your head. These automatic thoughts can be positive or negative. Some of your self-talk comes from logic and reason. Other self-talk may arise from misconceptions that you create because of lack of information or expectations due to preconceived ideas of what may happen.
If the thoughts that run through your head are mostly negative, your outlook on life is more likely pessimistic. If your thoughts are mostly positive, you're likely an optimist — someone who practices positive thinking.


The health benefits of positive thinking

Researchers continue to explore the effects of positive thinking and optimism on health. Health benefits that positive thinking may provide include:
·       Increased life span
·       Lower rates of depression
·       Lower levels of distress and pain
·       Greater resistance to illnesses
·       Better psychological and physical well-being
·       Better cardiovascular health and reduced risk of death from cardiovascular disease and stroke
·       Reduced risk of death from cancer
·       Reduced risk of death from respiratory conditions
·       Reduced risk of death from infections
·       Better coping skills during hardships and times of stress
 
It's unclear why people who engage in positive thinking experience these health benefits. One theory is that having a positive outlook enables you to cope better with stressful situations, which reduces the harmful health effects of stress on your body.

It's also thought that positive and optimistic people tend to live healthier lifestyles — they get more physical activity, follow a healthier diet, and don't smoke or drink alcohol in excess.


Identifying negative thinking

Not sure if your self-talk is positive or negative? Some common forms of negative self-talk include:
Filtering. You magnify the negative aspects of a situation and filter out all the positive ones. For example, you had a great day at work. You completed your tasks ahead of time and were complimented for doing a speedy and thorough job. That evening, you focus only on your plan to do even more tasks and forget about the compliments you received.

Personalizing. When something bad occurs, you automatically blame yourself. For example, you hear that an evening out with friends is canceled, and you assume that the change in plans is because no one wanted to be around you.

Catastrophizing. You automatically anticipate the worst without facts that the worse will happen. The drive-through coffee shop gets your order wrong, and then you think that the rest of your day will be a disaster.

Blaming. You try to say someone else is responsible for what happened to you instead of yourself. You avoid being responsible for your thoughts and feelings.

Saying you "should" do something. You think of all the things you think you should do and blame yourself for not doing them.

Magnifying. You make a big deal out of minor problems.

Perfectionism. Keeping impossible standards and trying to be more perfect sets yourself up for failure.

Polarizing. You see things only as either good or bad. There is no middle ground.
 

Focusing on positive thinking

You can learn to turn negative thinking into positive thinking. The process is simple, but it does take time and practice — you're creating a new habit, after all. Following are some ways to think and behave in a more positive and optimistic way:
· Identify areas to change. If you want to become more optimistic and engage in more positive thinking, first identify areas of your life that you usually think negatively about, whether it's work, your daily commute, life changes or a relationship. You can start small by focusing on one area to approach in a more positive way. Think of a positive thought to manage your stress instead of a negative one.
· Check yourself. Periodically during the day, stop and evaluate what you're thinking. If you find that your thoughts are mainly negative, try to find a way to put a positive spin on them.
· Be open to humor. Give yourself permission to smile or laugh, especially during difficult times. Seek humor in everyday happenings. When you can laugh at life, you feel less stressed.
· Follow a healthy lifestyle. Aim to exercise for about 30 minutes on most days of the week. You can also break it up into 5- or 10-minute chunks of time during the day. Exercise can positively affect mood and reduce stress. Follow a healthy diet to fuel your mind and body. Get enough sleep. And learn techniques to manage stress.
· Surround yourself with positive people. Make sure those in your life are positive, supportive people you can depend on to give helpful advice and feedback. Negative people may increase your stress level and make you doubt your ability to manage stress in healthy ways.
· Practice positive self-talk. Start by following one simple rule: Don't say anything to yourself that you wouldn't say to anyone else. Be gentle and encouraging with yourself. If a negative thought enters your mind, evaluate it rationally and respond with affirmations of what is good about you. Think about things you're thankful for in your life.
Here are some examples of negative self-talk and how you can apply a positive thinking twist to them:

Putting positive thinking into practice

Negative self-talk Positive thinking

I've never done it before. It's an opportunity to learn something new.

It's too complicated. I'll tackle it from a different angle.

I don't have the resources. Necessity is the mother of invention.

There's no way it will work. I can try to make it work.

It's too radical a change. Let's take a chance.

I'm not going to get any better at this. I'll give it another try.


Practicing positive thinking every day

If you tend to have a negative outlook, don't expect to become an optimist overnight. But with practice, eventually your self-talk will contain less self-criticism and more self-acceptance. You may also become less critical of the world around you.

When your state of mind is generally optimistic, you're better able to handle everyday stress in a more constructive way. That ability may contribute to the widely observed health benefits of positive thinking.
 
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With all that being said, my practice will be going through some changes as well. These are positive changes for sure. While keeping my private practice, I will be reducing the size of it because I have also signed on to help clients in other states through a nationwide organization. My newsletter will now be quarterly instead of monthly moving forward, and I will not be accepting new clients through my private practice for a few months at least, until I am settled into my new routine. I welcome you to visit my website and access the 100+ newsletters already listed on the archive page. I welcome comments and questions through the link on my website’s Contact Me tab. I am excited about these new changes, even though there will be rough spots to work through. I am so appreciative of all the support my business has received over the last 13 years and I look forward to more opportunities to help you in the future.  I hope you are able to look at the new challenges in your life through positive self-talk whenever possible.
 
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Stay well,

Maryellen Dabal, MA, LMFT
817-876-9958
www.dabalmft.com
maryellen@dabalmft.com
Quote of the Month

Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.
― by Viktor E. Frankl, Man's Search for Meaning, Austrian psychiatriast and author.

  Source: www.goodreads.com
Fact of the Month

The “dog days of summer” refer to the weeks between July 3 and August 11 and are named after the Dog Star (Sirius) in the Canis Major constellation. The ancient Greeks blamed Sirius for the hot temperatures, drought, discomfort, and sickness that occurred during the summer.

Source: www.justfunfacts.com


You're worth the effort!!!!
I welcome the opportunity to help you work through current issues and to look at your future with a sense of hope and purpose.
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Feedback
I welcome feedback regarding the newsletter or questions about my practice. I can be reached at maryellen@dabalmft.com. I cannot, however, give advice through email. For more information on my practice please visit www.dabalmft.com

I wish you well...