Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve
photo by Eric Crossan

This enewsletter from the DNREC Delaware Coastal Training Program (CTP) features resources that are available for Delaware's community leaders and natural resource managers to help us plan smarter for safer and more sustainable communities! 

The roundup includes highlights of upcoming trainings, tools, technical assistance programs, and funding sources from the CTP as well as other local practitioners and technical experts. Please be in touch if you have more updates to share or are looking for additional info! 
Training and Classroom Learning Opportunities
Planning and Facilitating Collaborative Meetings
Weds. June 13 and Thurs. June 14, 2018
St. Jones Reserve Coastal Training Center, Dover, Del.

Registration Deadline: Monday, June 4, 2018
Calling all potential training participants - Register now so we can hit our minimum class size of 25 by June 4 so the NOAA Trainers can travel to Delaware to teach this important course!
$50 Registration fee covers lunch and refreshments.

This two day instructor-led course from the NOAA Office of Coastal Management is designed to increase participants’ ability to plan and facilitate a meeting (or a series of meetings) that minimize conflict and enhance problem solving.

Collaboration is often cited as a good way to address coastal resource management issues, but the collaborative process is complicated, requiring a systematic approach. This course provides the skills and tools to design and implement collaborative approaches. The skills will be useful even when attending, but not running, a collaborative meeting. 
You will learn how to:

  • Determine if a collaborative process is appropriate
  • Select people with the skills needed to fit each meeting role
  • Learn and practice facilitation skills
  • Use appropriate process tools and techniques to address the meeting objectives
  • Manage conflict in meetings by understanding group dynamics
  • Identify disruptive behaviors in group processes and practice strategies to deal with them

Who should take this course:

County, municipal and community leaders, regional and municipal planners, state agency staff, natural resource managers, non-profit and academic-based collaborative supporters & organizers, and more. 
Community Climate Adaptation
Tues. July 10 - Weds. July 11, 2018
St. Jones Reserve Coastal Training Center, Dover, Del.

Held in partnership with Delaware Sea Grant.
$20 Registration fee covers lunch and refreshments.

Communities increasingly realize the need for adaptation strategies, but many are unsure where to begin. This interactive course provides individuals with a thorough grounding and practical skills for incorporating adaptation strategies into planning processes. AICP and CFM credits will be available for participating American Planning Association professionals.

Participants will learn how to:
  • Apply the basic elements of an adaptation planning framework to organize future preparedness efforts,
  • Translate climate science into impacts on local community assets and practice compiling a vulnerability assessment,
  • Identify, compare, and prioritize locally relevant adaptation strategies and actions,
  • Describe implementation options for different strategies.
Who should take this course:

County, municipal and community leaders, regional and municipal planners, state agency staff, natural resource managers, non-profit and academic-based collaborative supporters & organizers, and more. 
Planning Effective Projects
Tuesday, July 24 - Weds. July 25, 2018
St. Jones Reserve Coastal Training Center, Dover, Del.
$50 Registration fee covers lunch and refreshments.

In this two-day interactive instructor-led course from the NOAA Office of Coastal Management you will learn how to conduct a project assessment, use a logic model to plan a new project or reassess a current one, and prepare for a meaningful evaluation. Attend this course to learn project planning practices that help you build on accountability and strategic thinking, reveal assumptions, and create a targeted effort with measurable results.Great for those planning and implementing grant projects!

Note: this course is a prerequisite for the Planning for Meaningful Evaluation training below
Who should take this course:

County, municipal and community leaders, regional and municipal planners, state agency staff, natural resource managers, non-profit and academic-based collaborative supporters & organizers, and more. 
Planning for Meaningful Evaluation
Weds. September 26 - Thurs. Sept. 27, 2018
St. Jones Reserve Coastal Training Center, Dover, Del.
$50 Registration fee covers lunch and refreshments.

Do you ever ask yourself, “Is my program designed to reach its goals?” or “How do I measure the performance of my existing program?” We would like to help you answer those questions.

This training addresses in detail the increasing demand for evidence of program accountability and impact by preparing participants for a meaningful evaluation. Participants will actively engage in creating a comprehensive evaluation plan. The purpose of the training is to provide an in depth understanding of the elements of evaluation, so that participants are able to make informed choices to create fundamentally sound evaluation plans for existing or longstanding programs.

Logic modeling is a concept at the heart of the effective program design and meaningful evaluation techniques taught in course. Participants in the workshop will be expected to understand logic modeling and are encouraged to bring a working or draft logic model built for your program with you to use during the workshop.
This workshop requires previous training in the development and use of logic models. If you have attended NOAA’s Planning Effective Projects workshop or you have other training in the development and use of logic models then you may attend this workshop.

Who should take this course:

County, municipal and community leaders, regional and municipal planners, state agency staff, natural resource managers, non-profit and academic-based collaborative supporters & organizers, and more. 
Community Technical Assistance Opportunity
Resilient Community Partnership
Improving the management and wise use of land and water resources while promoting compatible economic development of the coastal zone is a key goal of the Delaware Coastal Programs (DCP) of the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. The Resilient Community Partnership program provides technical assistance and potential funding to plan for and reduce the impacts of coastal hazards related to flooding from sea level rise, coastal storms and climate change through the development of planning strategies at the local level.  

The DCP is soliciting Letters of Interest (maximum of 8 pages, not including letters of support) from state, county, and municipal government entities within the State of Delaware to enter into a Resilient Community Partnership for projects that will support local resilience planning and adaptation activities in Delaware. 

Examples of eligible projects include, but are not limited to:

1. Assessments of vulnerability to flooding due to sea level rise, coastal storms, and nuisance flooding (sunny day flooding),
2. Assessments of local land use ordinances, zoning codes and building codes for the purpose of identifying barriers and opportunities, and recommending improvements,
3. Adaptation plans that outline short and long-term actions that can be taken to reduce vulnerability and increase preparedness, including updating comprehensive land-use plans. Such plans can be drafted for a specific community, town, or region or for a specific type of resource or infrastructure,
4. Design of on-the-ground adaptation projects,
5. Improving communication of risk and adaptation options to affected populations from flooding due to sea level rise, coastal storms, and nuisance flooding.

Limited funding is available for activities that require advanced technical assistance and are required to support the project objectives. The DCP will work with RCP awardee(s) to determine the technical needs of the proposed project and, as appropriate, retain subject matter experts or contractors to meet project requirements and deadlines.  

Applicants are encouraged to communicate with DCP staff to help answer any questions and ensure all submissions address the specified criteria. Examples of previous partnerships can be found at http://de.gov/resilientcommunity.

IMPORTANT DATES 

June 29, 2018 - Letters of Interest due to Delaware Coastal Programs Office

July 18, 2018 - Selected Partnership(s) announced.

For further details regarding the Resilient Community Partnership Program, applicants are encouraged to contact Kelly Valencik (302) 739-6377; kelly.valencik@state.de.us 
Resources for Practitioners & Communities
Socioeconomic Benefits of Delaware Wetlands

As the lowest lying state in the U.S. at a mean elevation of 60 ft. above sea level along a hundred-mile Atlantic coast line, Delaware’s wetlands occupy approximately a quarter of the First State’s land area and supply important ecosystem services functions in the flood control, water quality, fisheries, and recreation sectors of the economy. Little is known about the socioeconomic value of this important coastal habitat. What is the economic value of wetlands in Delaware? What is the value of these natural resources in terms of ecosystem goods and services? How many jobs are supported by wetlands?The University of Delaware Water Resources Center sought to quantify the economic value of wetlands in Delaware utilizing the principles of ecological economics and willingness to pay models

Wetlands, marshes, and bogs in Delaware provide significant economic value ranging from $1 billion to $3 billion annually and support 25,000 jobs with $568 million in wages in the state and surrounding region. This report examines the economic value of wetlands in Delaware in three ways:

  • Economic value directly related to Delaware wetland habitat. Delaware wetlands contribute over $1 billion in annual economic value from water quality, flood control, parks/open space, fish/wildlife, recreation, forested wetlands/carbon storage, and nonuse value (willingness to pay) functions.

  • Value of goods and services provided by Delaware wetlands. Wetland ecosystems in Delaware provide a present value (PV) of $3 billion per year in goods and services in 2010 dollars with a net present value (NPV) of $99 billion calculated over a 100-year period.
  • Employment supported by Delaware wetlands. Delaware wetlands support 25,000 direct and indirect jobs with $568 million in wages from employment in the living marine resources, tourism/recreation, fishing/hunting/birding, national wildlife refuge, outdoor recreation, and wetland organization sectors.

Wetlands that cover about a quarter of the State of Delaware land mass provide significant economic benefits to the First State and are worthy of investment to keep these productive living resources healthy and productive. These estimates were made by utilizing values from the peer reviewed literature and existing studies and applying them to Delaware using ecological economics and benefits-transfer techniques described in this report. All values in are in 2010 dollars except where noted. 

It is also important to note that the estimates presented in this report are not all inclusive due to a lack of data for some economic sectors. Some values were not included in these estimates because the data to assess them either are not readily available or do not exist. Regardless of the lack of data in some economic sectors, these estimates clearly indicate that Delaware wetlands contribute between $1 billion and $3 billion annually to the state and regional economy and support at least 25,000 jobs. 

The full report is available here:
Funding Opportunities
Find additional grant opportunities by searching the Delaware Database for Funding Resilient Communities!

Storm surges, nor’easters, heavy precipitation events, and sea level rise threaten municipalities around the state, and climate models predict that these hazards will increase in severity and frequency in the future. Financial assistance programs are available to support the implementation of projects to prepare for and adapt to these threats. The Institute for Public Administration (IPA) at the University of Delaware, with support from DNREC Delaware Coastal Programs office, compiled relevant financial assistance programs into a searchable web database for Delaware’s local governments. 
Guide to using the database 
As a part of our mission, the Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve is committed to promoting informed decision making through the Delaware Coastal Training Program. This program addresses critical coastal resource management issues in Delaware by providing current scientific information, access to technologies and skill-building opportunities to Delawareans responsible for making decisions about the state's coastal resources. 

Requests for submittal: Have a great resource, training, or program that you want to share with Delaware community leaders and natural resources managers to help make our communities safer and more sustainable? Please submit information for inclusion in this e-newsletter to the contact below.
Kelly Valencik | Delaware National Estuarine Research Reserve | 302-739-6377