September news & updates
building awareness
How the 5 Steps Can Help Someone Who is Suicidal

Courtesy of BeThe1To.com
The five action steps for communicating with someone who may be suicidal are supported by evidence in the field of suicide prevention.

ASK
How – Asking the question “Are you thinking about suicide?” communicates that you’re open to speaking about suicide in a non-judgmental and supportive way. Asking in this direct, unbiased manner, can open the door for effective dialogue about their emotional pain and can allow everyone involved to see what next steps need to be taken. Other questions you can ask include, “How do you hurt?” and “How can I help?” Do not ever promise to keep their thoughts of suicide a secret.

The flip side of the “Ask” step is to “Listen.” Make sure you take their answers seriously and not to ignore them, especially if they indicate they are experiencing thoughts of suicide. Listening to their reasons for being in such emotional pain, as well as listening for any potential reasons they want to continue to stay alive, are both incredibly important when they are telling you what’s going on. Help them focus on their reasons for living and avoid trying to impose your reasons for them to stay alive.

Why – Studies show that asking at-risk individuals if they are suicidal does not increase suicides or suicidal thoughts. In fact, studies suggest the opposite: findings suggest acknowledging and talking about suicide may in fact reduce rather than increase suicidal ideation.

Click image to access a downloadable PDF and other state statistics in the country.
Sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Recovery Month is a national observance held every September to educate Americans that substance use treatment and mental health services can enable those with mental and substance use disorders to live healthy and rewarding lives. This observance celebrates the millions of Americans who are in recovery from mental and substance use disorders, reminding us that treatment is effective and that people can and do recover. It also serves to help reduce the stigma and misconceptions that cloud public understanding of mental and substance use disorders, potentially discouraging others from seeking help. 
thank you kodiak community!
A big shout out to all the community members who have volunteered their services, time, monies, donations, and gifts throughout this summer.

We are so appreciative of all the support!
employment opportunities
Interested in joining KWRCC Staff?
For more information about current KWRCC employment opportunities visit
our posting for a part-time Spanish Speaking Immigrant Advocate on Alaska Jobs.
~ KWRCC is a COVID Conscious Employer ~
KWRCC & COVID-19
Our Services
We are here to support victims, their families, and the community in every way we can and KWRCC continues to provide all of our domestic violence and sexual assault services. Our shelter, offices and Donation Room remain open for those in need of assistance.
Want to receive regular KWRCC
news, updates, and announcements?
Please subscribe with your name and email address.
KWRCC Board of Directors
President: Heidi Barret-McNerney
Vice President: Debbie Olson
Treasurer: Karissa Stoecker
Secretary: Cassie Keplinger
Board Member: Kim Sibrel
Board Member: Megan Ivanoff
Board Member: Selida Guitron-Padilla
Board Member: Katherine Gronn
Board Member: Hailey Thompson
KWRCC Staff
Executive Director: Rebecca Shields
SART & Shelter Coordinator: Penny Lampl
Case Management: Melissa Austin
Outreach Advocate: Ellamy Tiller
Outreach Technology: Ann Kirven
Advocate: Pinky Cruz
Advocate: Florence Darling
Advocate: Kimberly Dolph
Advocate: Debbie Eggemeyer
Advocate: Skylar Gertz
Advocate: Marie Jmili
Advocate: Lisa Johnson