www.LarryRobbin.com
Issue 27
The California Workforce Association Youth Employment Conference

Larry will be presenting a special preconference session, Does Your Program Meet Youth Performance Standards? and a workshop titled The Revolutionary New Captain and Coach Approach to Case Management.



The National Association of Workforce Development Professionals Annual Conference

Larry will be presenting a special preconference session, The Revolutionary New Captain and Coach Approach to Case Management and a workshop From Dating to Marriage!  How to Make Your Organization a Better Partner! 





January 26, 2017

Learn how to make the profit making case to employers so they see the bottom line benefits of hiring youth.  Find out why describing your services is a big mistake and get better ways to communicate what you do.  Fill your employer presentations with the antidotes to their resistance to hiring youth.  Close the gap between what you say and how employers think - open the doors to more employment opportunities for the youth in your program!  



February 16, 2017

Recruiting youth is a challenge, but keeping them engaged so they stay in your program and take full advantage of what it has to offer can be even a bigger challenge. Discover how engagement with your program is, in part, determined even before youth start your services. Learn from the feedback of youth what programs inadvertently do that alienates them. Upgrade all the aspects of your model and direct services so they appeal to youth at the highest levels and you can help them finish your program successfully!

For questions about the webinars contact Thomas Showalter at 

Larry Robbin Training Topics

Larry trains on more than 300 topics. This list features some of the most requested workshops. Click here for the list of training topics. If you do not see what you need, please contact Larry to see if he trains on that subject. Larry trains onsite, by telephone or by webinar.

Don't miss my upcoming conference presentations and webinars.  Check out the information in the left hand column of the newsletter.  Want to bring these trainings to your organization?  Contact me at larry@larryrobbin.com
 

ARE THESE INTERVIEW QUESTIONS ILLEGAL?



In my experience training thousands of workforce development professionals every year, I find that the vast majority of people do not know what interview questions are illegal.  In addition, in my experience consulting with employers, I find that about a third of them are asking illegal questions in an interview.  This is typically because they do not know the law, but in some cases, it is the result of prejudice in the hiring decision.  If I find it is prejudice in the hiring decision, that employer will not become a client of mine and I will report them to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. 
 
You have a responsibility to educate your job seekers about illegal interview questions.  What can you and your job seekers do if employers ask these questions?  There are several options.  The job seeker can answer the question without saying anything more about it.  They can ask why the employer wants this information.  The job seeker can point out that it is an illegal question and say they are trying to help the employer avoid a lawsuit.  This will likely mean they will not get a job offer, but it also may mean that employer will change what they ask in an interview.  The other option is for you to contact the employer, either anonymously or with an email or a letter and let them know they are asking an illegal question.  Include the attached information in your email or letter.  We need to make sure that employers are following the law and asking only legal questions so every job seeker has a chance at a job opening.    If you would like to discuss bringing my workshop, HOW TO CLOSE THE GAP BETWEEN INTERVIEWS AND JOB OFFERS!, to your organization, please email me at larry@larryrobbin.comTo find out more about what is illegal to ask in a job interview from a federal law perspective, click here.  

Keep in mind that your state or local area may also have laws governing what employers can ask in interviews.  Contact the appropriate agency in your area for more information.


HOW CAN YOU LEVERAGE SOCIAL CAPITAL
FOR TANF PARTICIPANTS AND OTHER LOW INCOME POPULATIONS  TO IMPROVE EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES?

Success in job search and employment is often more about who you know than what you know.  The workforce system tends to focus on human capital - skills, education and experience, but this often means people will not get job offers because human capital alone is often the complete to getting the best jobs.  This video will show you how to increase the social capital of low income job seekers to they can develop the kind of relationships that will result in them becoming employed at the highest levels possible.  Click here to see the video.


  THE TEN MOST ODDBALL INTERVIEW QUESTIONS FOR 2016

Would you rather fight one horse sized duck or 100 duck sized horses?  This is one of the interview questions asked at Whole Foods!  This list reveals a lot about how employers ask out of the box questions to get at how people think and will act on the job.  Check here for the list.


JOB READINESS EXERCISES FOR IMMIGRANTS AND
REFUGEES  AND OTHER POPULATIONS

This is a great list of job readiness exercises for programs working with immigrants and refugees.  These exercises can be modified for use with other populations as well.  Click here to get a list of creative ideas for teaching job readiness.

 
HOW DO YOU DESIGN BRIDGE PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG ADULTS?

If you work with low income adults and want to know how to create pathways that will bridge the gap between where they are now and good careers, you will definitely want to check out this guide.  This comprehensive and detailed bridge program plan guide was developed by Women Employed, the Chicago Jobs Council and UIC Great Cities Institute.  It is a great step by step outline about how to build a successful bridge program.  Click here for the guide.

 
WHAT WORKS IN REENTRY?

I have been involved as a staff person, manager, program designer, consultant and trainer in reentry employment work for over forty-five years.  Helping these returning citizens achieve successful employment outcomes can be a challenging task due to the barriers to employment of the individuals and the prejudice against hiring them in the employer community.  What works in reentry employment?  This is a summary of some programs that have helped second chance individuals succeed in employment.  While I do not agree with the concepts behind every program on this list, I do think it will be helpful for people working on the issue of reentry and employment to become familiar with some of these best practices.  For information on some of the services I provide to reentry employment programs click here.  For the summary of programs that work, click here.


WORK AND LEARN GUIDE

Hands-on, real-world work opportunities help students connect the dots between what they learn in school and what they will need to know to be successful in their careers. Characteristics of today's workplace make this connection more important than ever. First, today's jobs require individuals to have more specific, technical skills. Second, staffs are smaller, and employees need to be agile and respond to many tasks and changing responsibilities quickly. Third, employee demographics are changing as baby boomers retire and generations X and Y increasingly fill leadership roles. Finally, and more critically, technology changes so rapidly that there is a driving need for employees to innovate quickly and update and acquire new skills continuously.
 
Work-and-learn program partnerships are one solid way to surmount these challenges. Developing more work-and learn partnerships among schools, businesses and other partners offers a clear path to giving working learners real-world experience on the job while in school. Building sustainable programs across the nation is boosting long term learning and is a proven approach to solving the skills gap. The following report will introduce you to the nuts and bolts of work-and-learn and provide short summaries of programs delivering results today to businesses of varying sizes. This guide is intended to introduce employers, educators and others to a range of options along the work-and-learn continuum to help them find an approach that works for their organization and community. These programs can occur in a school, at a workplace or in the community. The models the National Network of Business and Industry Associations have chosen are yielding results and offering valuable lessons learned - paving the way to a future where work-and-learn is standard issue across the American economy.  Click here for this important report.


MANAGEMENT CORNER
ARE YOU DEVELOPING THE NEXT LEADERS OF
YOUR ORGANIZATION?



Most organizations do not have any plans for developing the next generation of leaders.  As a result, many organizations falter when the current leaders leave.  Leaders leave in a planned way or unfortunately sometimes because of an accident, health problem or even death.  I have seen many strong organizations become very weak players because there are serious gaps between the strength of the present leaders and the next tier of leadership.  This report is filled with words of wisdom and best practices for succession planning.  Do not wait until a crisis to start acting on this information.  The future of your organization will depend on it.  Click here for the report.


COLLEGE AND YOUR MENTAL HEALTH

If you help people go to college, this report is a must read for you and your students.  Attending college is a time of significant transition, which can be both positive and challenging. For some, the stress of college may impact mental health, making it difficult to manage the daily demands of school.  In fact, did you know as many as one in five students experiences a mental health condition while in college?
 
To help put a thoughtful plan into place should a mental health condition arise, NAMI (the National Alliance on Mental Illness) and JED have created this guide to help start the conversation. It offers workforce development staff, parents and students the opportunity to learn more about mental health, including what the privacy laws are and how mental health information can be shared. Conversations allow you to help your students plan for the unexpected; to know what to do if they develop emotional distress, a mental health condition or if an existing condition worsens. Talking about mental health is important even if a person does experience a mental health condition because a friend may need help. Students often prefer to confide in a friend before confiding in anyone else-or people may notice that a peer is struggling and they may be able to assist. By learning more, you will be better equipped to help your students and to inform them about what to do if a friend is in distress.  Click here for the report.


DO YOUR JOB SEEKERS TAKE REFERENCE SHEETS
TO INTERVIEWS?

Your job seekers should be taking more than their resume and a note pad to interviews.  Very few job seekers bring reference sheets to interviews, but they can be a very effective selling tool.  This article will show you the best practices for reference sheets.  Click here for the article.


IS YOUR ORGANIZATION CULTURALLY COMPETENT?

Cultural competence requires commitment, planning and action.  Many organizations just assume they are culturally competent without ever really defining what that means or having plans for getting better as culturally competent organizations.  This excellent guide from the Chicago Jobs Council will help your organization become more culturally competent.  It is a very practical approach to this complex issue and it features a great resource guide to take your work further so you can more effective in this very diverse world of workforce development.  Click here to see the report.


HOW CAN YOUTH PROGRAMS STAY
SUSTAINABLE AND RELEVANT?

From the moment of concept to the creation of a youth service program, a youth service provider must be thinking about an essential element - sustainability. How will this service have a lasting impact and remain integrated and relevant in the community in order to achieve the desired change we want? MANY is a national network that engages stakeholders across sectors to strengthen outcomes for youth at highest risk for victimization & delinquency. Annually, MANY connects with over 12,000 non-profit providers, funders, and researchers, and provides intensive training and support to about 3,000 of these organizations each year. MANY tends to attract the innovators in the field and has over 165 member organizations across the country who are engaged regularly to assess emerging issues in local communities-and offer real-time solutions.
 
Based on their experience in working with diverse youth service agencies nationally, along with input from six youth service agency leaders from across the country representing diverse approaches to youth services, MANY has identified key considerations and strategies for agencies to include as they develop and sustain both their programs, and the services they have identified as critical to their communities.
While this report is not specifically about workforce development, it is must reading for everyone that wants to learn strategies to help their programs survive and thrive.  There are also many lessons here for adult providers.  Click here for the report.


30 THINGS YOU SHOULD NEVER SAY IN AN INTERVIEW

As someone that has been in literally thousands of interviews consulting with employers to help them improve their hiring processes and decisions, I have heard everything on this list many times.  You may assume your job seekers are not saying these things, but if you give them the list they will almost always find something they are saying that they should leave out of their next interview.  Click here for the list.


MAKING THE EMPLOYER CONNECTION!
EMPLOYER ENGAGEMENT IN WORKFORCE PROGRAMS:
WHAT DO WE KNOW?

The traditional relationship between employers and workforce organizations involves hiring.  Hiring is a transaction.  Employer engagement, on the other hand, is a much deeper relationship that is transformative.  Engagement transforms both the employer and the workforce organization in ways that are mutually beneficial and provide a more profound outcome than a basic placement.  This report explores the history of employer involvement in workforce programs in the United States, the different models of employer engagement, and what is known about the effectiveness of these efforts.  The report discuss why organizations and workforce systems struggle to engage employers, what can be learned from their experiences, and possible strategies for encouraging deeper connections with employers in order to improve outcomes for those who participate in workforce training programs.  I provide a management consulting session on this topic titled How to Go From Placement to Engagement with Employers that will teach you how to get money and more from your employer partners.  For a description of the consulting session, click here.  To read the report on employer engagement click here.


WHAT ARE THE BEST PRACTICES FOR TWO GENERATION STRATEGIES  TO GET FAMILIES OUT OF POVERTY?

One of the fastest growing trends in workforce development is working with both children and their parents in a model called a two generation approach.  Two-generation models target low-income children and parents from the same families in hopes of interrupting the cycle of poverty. However, the models themselves vary widely and policymakers and practitioners need guidance on how to best design them to achieve their ambitious goals and capitalize on their multiplier effects. To that end, this brief builds on the insights from the Housing Opportunities and Services Together (HOST) Demonstration to present an updated theoretical framework for two generation models. The framework emphasizes the importance of using family goals as the lens for targeting individual family members, setting individual goals, and aligning tailored appropriate solutions. This lens also necessitates prioritizing relationship building over programs, designing flexible evaluation approaches, and working for systems change to support families in their efforts.  To read this important report, click here


TWENTY-SIX COMPANIES THAT HIRE PEOPLE WITH AUTISM

This article will be helpful to people with autism and for those job developers working with people with autism.  It provides information about the companies as well as some helpful resource related to people with autism and employment.  For information on the training and consulting I provide to organizations serving people with disabilities click here. To read the article about the companies click here.


Your next interview will only be as good as
what you did well in the last interview that you should repeat and what you need to change to give a better interview this time!



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