A MESSAGE FROM MICHAEL CRUMPTON, INTERIM DEAN
Greetings and welcome to the end of the semester, it has been long and froth with dubious situations, but we are near the finish line at this writing. And that is a significant effort for our students to complete this semester in their academic journey, and for that we are thankful.

Speaking of being thankful, this is the time of year that we remember and think about all the things we are thankful for during the year. This year might have some different meanings to traditional things we are thankful for. For example, we are thankful for our health and from our individual experiences with the pandemic, we might be especially grateful for good health.

We are thankful for our loved ones and this year we must acknowledge that our loved ones have also endured a disruption to daily life and circumstances. We are grateful for the food on the table and the things we have, although in some respects it might have been harder to get or not what we were accustomed to. And we are grateful for each other, even if contact looked differently and we couldn’t touch or hold as desired.

I am grateful this year to all our library faculty and staff who worked hard on the front lines and behind the scenes virtually, to provide services and resources for our campus faculty and students so that the academic mission could move forward. I am also grateful to everyone who supported us during this process and understood that it was not business as usual, but reflective of everyone trying to do their best.

I sincerely wish that everyone finds peace and gratitude this holiday season and returns in the new year refreshed and with the encouragement of moving forward in what will hopefully be an improving situation. Let’s be optimistic and plan to be thankful for a return to normal next year with a learned and grateful understanding of each other, who we are and what we can do.

Michael Crumpton, MLIS, SHRM-SCP
Interim Dean and Associate Professor
FACULTY AND STAFF ORGANIZE STREAM CLEANUP
With the cooler fall weather settling in and limited access to activities during the pandemic, University Libraries’ faculty and staff found a great way to make a difference this semester. Department Head of the Harold Schiffman Music Library and Associate Professor Sarah Dorsey, along with Coordinator of Metadata Services and Associate Professor Anna Craft and Inter Library Loan Manager Dallas Burkhardt decided to go outside and clean up their stream near campus all while wearing face coverings and socially distancing themselves.

While they knew there would be trash and debris to pick up, they were surprised to see a friendly visitor perched up above. Say hello to our dear friend, the Barred Owl, who stopped by to see what we were doing in his neck of the woods on this warm fall day!

Story by Hollie Stevenson-Parrish
Image courtesy of Anna Craft
SCHOLARLY PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS BY UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES' FACULTY AND STAFF
Each year, University Libraries’ faculty and staff produce numerous articles that are published in nationally-recognized journals, present at local, national and global conferences and serve as leaders of important professional organizations. This scholarly activity connects the library to the community at large, enabling University Libraries to bring information and attributes from such efforts back to UNCG and enrich the students' educational experience. READ MORE.

Story by Hollie Stevenson-Parrish
Image courtesy of University Libraries
UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES WELCOMES KUKER AS NEW EVENING/WEEKEND MANAGER IN THE HSML
Vini Kuker has accepted the position of evening/weekend manager in the Harold Schiffman Music Library (HSML). Kuker received their master’s degree in library and information studies from UNC Greensboro’s School of Education in 2019 and graduated summa cum laude from UNCG in 2017 with a bachelor of arts in music from the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

According to Department Head of the HSML and Associate Professor Sarah Dorsey, “This pairs two very pertinent degrees for the position and Vini is well prepared and experienced.” READ MORE.

Story by Hollie Stevenson-Parrish
Image courtesy of Vini Kuker
ACCESS SERVICES DEPARTMENT HIRES HOPKINS
AS NEW SEARCH AND WEEKEND MANAGER
UNC Greensboro’s University Libraries is pleased to welcome new Search and Weekend Manager Christopher Hopkins to Jackson Library. Hopkins previously worked as a library assistant at Orange County Public Library in Hillsborough, North Carolina. He earned his undergraduate degree from UNCG in 2012 before earning a master of fine arts in creative writing with a concentration in poetry from Minnesota State University in Mankato, Minnesota. Prior to working in public libraries, Hopkins was employed as a circulation supervisor in Williams Library at Life University in Marietta, Georgia. READ MORE.

Story by Hollie Stevenson-Parrish
COLLINS FACILITATES VIRTURAL BOOK DISCUSSIONS ON IBRAM KENDI'S "HOW TO BE AN ANTIRACIST"
The Office of Alumni Engagement and University Libraries would like to send a special thanks to Dr. Armondo Collins for facilitating the first of several virtual discussions on Ibram Kendi’s “How To Be An Antiracist.” 

In a four-part series, Dr. Collins masterfully coupled his academic research and personal experiences with his candid demeanor, to skillfully and delicately navigate sensitive topics introduced by the author such as racism, colorism, double-consciousness, activism, self-transformation and social reform. Dr. Collins created a safe space and atmosphere where participants felt at ease and were encouraged to share personal narratives, transparent moments and ask honest questions that fostered critical thinking and open dialogue about race relations in our community. He was truly the highlight of these virtual book discussions.

Story by Nakia Hoskins
Image courtesy of Armondo Collins
UNCG PROJECT TELLS STORIES OF UNSUNG
CIVIL RIGHTS HEROES
We all know of the Greensboro Four, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., and John Lewis. But what about the civil rights activists who don’t end up in history books? A UNC Greensboro project seeks to tell the stories of these lesser-known civil rights heroes of the 1960s and 1970s. UNCG’s “Unsung Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement Project” launched today with 14 video interviews with activists whose work, while not always recognized, had profound impacts on the civil rights movement and helped set the stage for today’s #BlackLivesMatter movement. READ MORE.

Story by UNC Greensboro's University Communications
Image courtesy of the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives
LIBRARY FACULTY PUBLISH BOOK CHAPTERS
ON DIVERSITY, EQUITY AND INCLUSION
Four faculty members in University Libraries have published book chapters in “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Action: Planning, Leadership, and Programming.” The new book, published in September by the American Library Association (ALA), features chapters from Digital Projects Coordinator and Associate Professor David Gwynn, Discovery Cataloger and Assistant Professor Tiffany Henry, Curator of Manuscripts and Assistant Professor Stacey Krim and University Archivist and Associate Professor Erin Lawrimore.

While academic libraries need approaches to diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) that position these priorities as ongoing institutional and professional goals, the model programs outlined include a variety of initiatives that possess clear goals, demonstrable outcomes and reproducible strategies. READ MORE.

Story by Hollie Stevenson-Parrish
Image courtesy of the American Library Association (ALA)
VIOLONCELLO SOCIETY OF NEW YORK
DONATES ARCHIVES COLLECTION
The Violoncello Society of New York (VCS) is very pleased to announce the donation of its extensive archive to the Martha Blakeney Hodges Special Collections and University Archives at UNC Greensboro. Included in the VCS archive are additional materials from the American Cello Council dating back to the 1930s. VCS President, Kate Dillingham stated, “It is a wonderful moment in the society’s history for the archive to have a permanent home. Our long legacy of cello playing and musical culture in the United States is now available for cellists and cello enthusiasts throughout the world to experience through photographs, documents, programs and memorabilia. I look forward to working with Stacey Krim to feature items of interest from the archive for all to enjoy.” READ MORE.

Story by Stacey Krim
Image courtesy of the Violoncello Society of New York
OUR THANKS AND INFORMATION ABOUT YEAR-END GIFTS
Throughout the COVID-19 crisis, University Libraries has continued to rely on the support of donors and private dollars to help us in our primary mission: that is to connect students and faculty to vital resources from materials and technologies to individual assistance and classroom instruction. Because of you, we are able to do more and multiply the impact we have around the campus and around our community. READ MORE.

Story by Karlene Noel Jennings
Image courtesy of Andrew Gardner
NEXT UP FOR THE UNCG ALUMNI AND FRIENDS
BOOK CLUB: "IN COLD BLOOD"
Join us for our next UNCG Alumni and Friends Book Club discussion of Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood." The book will be our feature discussion for October, November and December.

On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues. As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy. At the center of his study are the amoral young killers Perry Smith and Dick Hickcock, who, vividly drawn by Capote, are shown to be reprehensible yet entirely and frighteningly human. "In Cold Blood" is a seminal work of modern prose, a remarkable synthesis of journalistic skill and powerfully evocative narrative.

The UNCG Alumni and Friends Book Club is sponsored by the Bryan School of Business & Economics, the Alumni Association and University Libraries.

Story by UNCG's Alumni Association
Image courtesy of Modern Library
NEA BIG READ: GREENSBORO'S NEXT COMMUNITY BOOK DISCUSSION IS NOVEMBER 17 AT 12 NOON
“My father, James Witherspoon, is a bigamist.” With the opening line of "Silver Sparrow," author Tayari Jones starts the story about a man's deception, a family's complicity, and the two teenage girls caught in the middle. What defines family?

Set in a middle-class neighborhood in Atlanta in the 1980s, the novel revolves around James Witherspoon's two families; the public one and the “family on the side” the secret one. When the daughters from each family meet and form a friendship, only one of them knows they are sisters. It is a relationship destined for trouble.

NEA Big Read is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. The event is sponsored by UNCG's African American and African Diaspora Studies Program, the Arts and Letters Committee of the Greensboro Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., the Greensboro Public Library and University Libraries. This virtual event via Zoom will be held on November 17, 2020 at 12 noon and is free and open to the public.

Image courtesy of Algonquin Books
ACCLAIMED PHOTOGRAPHER ADRIAN WHITE WILL LEAD THE NEXT ARTIST TALKS SERIES ON NOVEMBER 18 AT 7 PM
Los Angeles-based photographer Adrian White creates portraiture primarily dealing with memory, trauma and history from the perspective of people of the African diaspora. A question and answer session about his recent exhibition that mixes photography and video will follow the discussion.

White was born and raised in the small tobacco and cotton town of Stantonsburg, North Carolina. He received his bachelor of arts degree from North Carolina Central University in 2002, a bachelor of fine arts from the Brooks Institute of Photography in 2014 and a master of fine arts in photography and related media from the Parsons School of Design in 2019. This virtual event via Zoom will be held on November 18, 2020 at 7 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

Image courtesy of Adrian White
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