REGISTER FOR WEDNESDAY'S
4th of 7
LIVE FREE WEBINARS
From Real Time Solutions Series
The Apple Valley Chamber of Commerce in partnership with Lakeville, Burnsville, Hastings and River Heights Chambers & Open to Business is excited to offer you SEVEN complimentary Live 30-minute webinars to help your business navigate the questions, and new normal, related to the COVID-19 epidemic.

Wednesday's topic covers learning your legal responsibilities in regards to employees and how to best approach managing your cash flow.
Webinar Series Topics & Information
(All Webinars are 30 Minutes Long)
Wednesday April 1 | 8 am
CONCLUDED
CARES ACT & SMALL BUSINESS
Speaker: Ethan Hellier, Midwest Region Manager, U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Learn what the CARES Act means for your business .

Friday April 3 | 8 am
CONCLUDED
FEDERAL AND STATE FUNDING
Speaker: Bruce Goblirsch, President, Merchants Bank
Learn about the business funding options available and state and federal levels.

Monday April 6 | 8 am
CONCLUDED
MITIGATING BUSINESS RISK
Speaker: Matthew Schaap, Attorney, Dougherty, Molenda, Solfest, Hills & Bauer P.A.
Learn how to mitigate your business risk during COVID-19.

Wednesday April 8 | 8 am
THIS WEDNESDAY
EMPLOYEE LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS AND MANAGEMENT
Speaker: Matthew Schaap, Attorney, Dougherty, Molenda, Solfest, Hills & Bauer P.A.
Learn about your legal responsibilities and best approach to managing your cash flow.

Friday April 10 | 8 am
CREATING VALUE ONLINE
Speaker: Kari Switala, Owner, Wild Fig Marketing
Are you an online business now? Learn how to market yourself in this new era.

Monday April 13 | 8 am
FINANCIALS: PLANNING YOUR NEXT STEPS
Speaker: Scott Kadrlik, CPA and Managing Partner, Meuwissen, Flygare, Kadrlik & Associates
How to get your business back up and running after COVID-19.

Wednesday April 16 | 8 am
IMPROVING ONLINE BUSINESS PERFORMANCE
Speaker: Adam Bengston, President & CEO, Endorse Communications LLC
Learn how to conduct your business online in this new state of normal.

This Webinar Series is Presented By:
VIRTUAL HEARING AT THE MN HOUSE TOMORROW
Bill to Delay Sales Tax for Restaurants
APPLE VALLEY CHAMBER NOTE: IF YOU ARE A RESTAURANT, TOMORROW AT 8:30 a.m. will be a VIRTUAL HOUSE HEARING ABOUT A BILL TO DELAY SALES TAX FOR RESTAURANTS. YOU CAN TESTIFY.

House Taxes Committee to hear  bill  delaying the period before a business gets “posted” for being late on liquor payments.  The Committee will conduct a virtual hearing on Wednesday April 8 at 8:30 a.m. If you want to testify, contact ben@hospitalitymn.com by 1 p.m. on Tuesday.

Contact  the committee members to let them know you support this bill (HF2693) . Ask them to also support further delay or forgiveness for the sales tax remittance payments for April and May and to delay the May 15 property tax payments for at least 60 days. Let them know that our industry needs relief NOW if we are to survive the current crisis. Additional data you may wish to include: 
 
  • The hospitality industry employs 300,000 Minnesotans and generates over $42 million in sales per day and 18% of the state’s sales tax during normal economic conditions
  • The American Hotel & Lodging Association reports that even prior to the “Stay-at-Home” Order, Minnesota’s hotel sector had lost 24,185 direct hotel-related jobs, with a total of 58,972 jobs lost supporting the hotel sector
  • The National Restaurant Association indicates that the restaurant industry lost an estimated $324 million in sales and more than 51,000 jobs during the first 22 days of March. Between March 23-26, the Association surveyed restaurants and found that in Minnesota, 3% of operators had already been forced to close permanently, and another 11% anticipated having to do so in the next month. These numbers pre-dated the “Stay-at-Home” Order and have undoubtedly been exacerbated within the last two weeks
  • Service industry employers are uniquely impacted by the current market conditions, as well as the “Stay-at-Home” and closure orders of last month. Their revenue is almost entirely dependent on human interactions, social events and the ability of their workers and guests to move about freely. There is no telework option for this industry. With the extremely limited exceptions of providing food to-go or limited lodging/shelter services to either long-term guests or the essential workers (truckers, etc.) that are still allowed to travel, hotels, resorts, campgrounds, and restaurants are effectively shut-down throughout Minnesota
MN BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP
Notes from Conference Call
AV CHAMBER NOTE:  This is a conference call this morning FOR THE LARGEST COMPANIES IN MN through the MN BUSINESS PARTNERSHIP headed by Charlie Weaver. It includes GOVERNOR’S OFFICE, DEED and MANY OF THE SAME FROM THE MONDAY &THURSDAY CALLS. HERE, THEY ARE TRYING TO PREDICT THE PEAK (LIKELY JUNE).

2020 04 07 Call, MN Bus Partnership
Tuesday, April 7, 2020
8:34 AM

The MN Business Partnership (MBP) is comprised of the largest employers in the state of Minnesota.
 
Charlie Weaver, CEO of the MBP, kicked off the call.
 
Gov Walz COS Chris Schmitter – next big thing on Gov agenda is whether to extend the SAH order which expires Friday, April 10 at 5pm. Relying on Comm Malcolm, modeling data from here and other states, tracking scope of virus in our state. Additional factor is federal virus guidance which has changed dramatically in the last 2 weeks, feds are saying hunker down at least for another while. Gov has forecasted extending it, but we are being asked if he will make it more restrictive? At this point that is not the direction we would predict, as opposed to him just extending it as is. We see Dem and Republican Governors asking people to hunker down for a longer period of time and the feds are advising the same. Balance of public health with the massive economic effects of staying at home, which are also tied to health and well-being of people, and it’s a complex balance to strike.
 
MDH Comm Jan Malcolm – globally there are now 1.5m cases. US has same number of cases as all of Europe. In MN we have over 1000 cases now. Rate of growth day to day shows steady but not exponential growth, which tells us we aren’t at the peak yet. We need 14 days of reductions of cases before we should consider opening up the SAH order.
 
DEED Comm Steve Grove – at DEED we are very focused on two work groups – Economic Security, and Social Distancing. On the second, the work group is looking at how we balance people returning to work while maintaining some kinds of social distancing as much as needed?
UI remains an enormous item for DEED. Yesterday’s EO was important to about 45,000 people who were “stuck” and not able to get benefits due to various factors. We have re-opened the information line. Reminder that employers need to tell employees about the availability of UI for them. Waiting to see when the new federal benefits will kick in for people who are self-employed, etc – feds need to give states guidance on pay rates and other items, which we think should come by the end of April. That’s frustrating for a lot of people who need money now, but we are on hold until they give us more information. If a business offers voluntary leave and the employees take it, tell them to apply because they are eligible. Finally, we are putting together a series of virtual job fairs because we know some of you are hiring, first fair starts today.
 
MMB Comm Myron Frans – less than 6 weeks ago we issued the Feb forecast which showed a 1.5b projected surplus. Things have changed dramatically, obviously. We will have a report on April 10 th with an update. Our data lags, though, so it’s hard to get a handle on what’s happening with our revenue stream, plus we are doing some significant spending on COVID-19 relief. We are looking back at 2008 at Great Recession where there was great uncertainty – it was a 4 year period before revenues recovered fully. We are doing projections using those numbers, but adding in the federal resources we are going to get. 35,000 of the state’s 50,000 employees are tele-working now, looking to add more.  Will likely add an additional budget forecast this year, still working on when to do this . On federal funds – these are a recovery package, not a stimulus package – important difference.
 
US Sen Tina Smith – this is an unprecedented challenge on so many fronts. It was not unpredicted, but feel it has shaken people very deeply. My first priority is that we have more work to do nationally on the issues of testing and supply chain related to testing. We know the virus will peak and then decline in summer, but then come back again in the fall, and we have to be prepared. Second to that is support to hospital systems – preparing for the surge, cutting back on elective procedures which is a big source of revenues, and seeing a greater than normal incidence of payment through Medicaid and Medicare which don’t reimburse hospitals at their actual costs. So financially it’s very hard for those systems. State and local and tribal government resources are also going to dry up. So financially it’s just very hard.
 
Questions –
 
Joseph from Apogee Enterprises – to Comm Malcolm, I am scared that you said we need 14 days of reductions of cases before lifting the SAH. Malcolm – yes that is a daunting metric. We are looking at various factors and that’s just one. Our health care capacity to deal with influx of cases is of big concern.
 
Jim Owens, HB Fuller – for Comm Malcolm – what is your prediction for the current peak of disease? Malcolm – variability between different models is perplexing. There are very optimistic scenarios showing much faster peak with lower numbers of cases, like in late April. Our own models show peak in June with higher numbers. We are buying time with social distancing to build up health care and hospital system capacity, which is critical so we can be ready, and we are pushing the curve out in time. But it’s still going to peak. Buying time is good to build capacity but bad for the economy. We are looking at peak and thousands of cases at a time but still uncertain when. We see a growth in cases because we are doing more testing, but also because it is spreading.
 
Charlie – if the peak is in June, how are we doing in terms of equipment and ventilators etc? Malcolm – that’s a million dollar question. Our procurement team is working hard on this, to get N95 masks, and also masks for people to wear to protect other people – we call that source control. It’s important to wear masks to protect other people from our own germs. Really tough going on ventilators – globally everyone is still asking how fast can they be manufactured? How many are there in the world? Can we get them? We are well short of what we need.
 
Charlie – there is a difference between lifting the SAH order and having thousands attend a Twins game. What can be done? Chris Schmitter – absolutely. There are many nuances states will look at to balance the immediate public health needs and the broader economic needs. People in gathering in large numbers is one thing, while a business that can have people gather safely to work, incorporating social distancing, is another. Basic personal hygiene items are working – the washing of hands, cough into your sleeve, stay home and isolate if you are sick, etc.
Apple Valley Chamber of Commerce | info@applevalleychamber.com