Tuesday, July 20, 2021
Tifton, Georgia
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GrapeNew
CITY PUTS LIQUOR REFERENDUM ON NOVEMBER BALLOT
By FRANK SAYLES JR.
Tifton Grapevine
Tifton city residents will vote Nov. 2 on whether or not to allow liquor store package sales within the city.

Tifton City Council decided Monday, without discussion, to place on the ballot a special referendum authorizing the city to issue licenses for the package sale of distilled spirits.

The General Assembly this year amended the law to allow a municipality or county to initiate such a referendum without first requiring a petition by a specified number of registered voters.

During a City Council workshop last week, Mayor Julie B. Smith said she views the matter as a revenue issue, as Tifton is losing money to nearby communities that allow liquor stores to sell distilled spirits.

Tifton did not allow the sale of liquor by the drink in restaurants until 2004.

Council on Monday also temporarily delayed the proposed annexing and rezoning of two tracts on the northern end of the city for creation of a solar farm. City Attorney Rob Wilmot said the acreage to be annexed has been revised and that the city Planning and Zoning Commission needs to address a "conditional zoning” proposal.

"We need to dot our ‘I’s and cross our ‘T's," Wilmot said.

Regarding city board appointments, council named Franklin Guill to the Historic Preservation Commission and reappointed Adam Simmons and Ann Clayton to the panel.

Mayor Smith also appointed Larry Mims and Randy Chambers to the Housing Authority Board.
TIFT COUNTY'S COVID CASES
FOUR TIMES HIGHER WITHIN TWO-WEEK PERIOD
By FRANK SAYLES JR.
Tifton Grapevine
Confirmed cases of COVID-19 are rising rapidly in Tift County with new cases four times higher in the past two weeks than in the previous two-week period, according to state data.

Tift County has recorded 40 new confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the past two weeks, the Ga. Department of Public Health (DPH) reported Tuesday. There were only 10 new confirmed cases in the previous two-week period, the DPH reported.

Tift's daily average of new cases is 19 per 100,000 population – the highest since March 4, according to data from Emory University.

As of Tuesday, the DPH said Tift County's positive testing rate during the recent two-week period is 8%; it was 4% in the previous period. Tift's confirmed cases during the past two weeks represent 98 per 100,000 population.

New confirmed cases of COVID-19 are rising not only in Tift County but throughout the state. Georgia health officials say the state during the past week has seen the most new cases since the end of February and the most new hospitalizations since May.

On Tuesday, the state reported 1,055 new cases in a 24-hour period with 8 additional deaths and 71 new hospitalizations. During the past weekend, a 5-year-old Calhoun boy died of the virus, the state reported.

Cases of COVID-19 are rising in all 50 states, partly because of the virus' Delta variant. The highly contagious variant now accounts for about 70% of all new cases, most of which are among those who haven’t been vaccinated.

Of 480 Georgians hospitalized with COVID-19 this month, 416 were not fully vaccinated, according to the DPH.
ANNIE BELLE CLARK PRINCIPAL RECEIVES NATIONAL RECOGNITION
Staff Reports
Dr. Stephanie Morrow, a 2020 National Distinguished Principal, has been recognized this month at both the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP) conference in Chicago and at the Ga. Association of Elementary School Principals summer board meeting at Jekyll Island.

Morrow initially received the designation last summer as a National Distinguished Principal, but the NAESP conference was canceled last year because of the pandemic.

She has served during the past nine years as principal at Annie Belle Clark Elementary School.

The NAESP website notes that Morrow "takes a collaborative approach to school improvement; for example, along with district leadership, she engaged a broad set of community stakeholders in conversations about how elementary instruction can better prepare students for their future roles as workers and community members.

"This work has led to a strong focus on early literacy and the implementation of a tiered approach to guided reading, which has in turn yielded broad academic gains."

The national organization says that "Morrow sees herself as a servant leader and values mutual trust and teamwork as bedrock elements of her professional growth and effectiveness. She is also a strong believer in the responsibility of principals to build the capacity and leadership of their staff and colleagues, and is proud to have mentored two assistant principals who have gone on to assume higher leadership roles."
COMMUNITY RESOURCE FAIR HELPS FAMILIES PREPARE FOR SCHOOL YEAR
By BONNIE SAYLES
Tifton Grapevine
Tift County’s annual Back to School Community Resource Fair and School Supply Giveaway will be held at 4-6 p.m. Thursday at the Tift County Recreation Department (TCRD).

Sponsored by TCRD, the Tift County Commission on Children and Youth (TCCCY), the Jay Deason Fund, and Southwell Tift Regional Medical Center, the event is open to the community, especially familIes with children going to school this fall. 

“We are all glad to be able to have an in-person event and share community resources with families,” said TCCCY Executive Director Lillie McEntyre. “School supplies are a big expense for families, and we are happy to be able to help them with this need.” 

Attendees will learn about services and resources that are available. School supplies will be distributed for children in grades K-12.

“Your child will leave the event with many of the school supplies they need,” McEntyre said. Children must be present to get supplies with no pick up for anyone not attending. They are available on a first-come/first-served basis.

Thirty-one exhibitors will have representatives giving away school supplies and explaining their services.

They are: Affinity Pediatrics, Amerigroup, Ameris Bank, Caresource, Coastal Plain CASA, Coastal Plain E.O.A. Inc., ESS, GFWC Tifton Woman’s Club, Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia, The Howard Center, Literacy Volunteers of Tifton-Tift County, Milestones Therapy, Military Family Support Branch, The Salvation Army, South Tifton Learning Center, Southern Regional Technical College, Southwell School-Based Clinics, and Southwell/Tift Regional Medical Center.

Also, Tift County 4-H, Tift County Board of Commissioners, Tift County Commission on Children & Youth, Tift County Council on Child Abuse, Tift County Health Department, Tift County Recreation Department, Tift County Schools Administrative Offices, Tifton Fire Department, Toys for Tots, Troy University, UGA Cooperative Extension, United Way of South Central Georgia, and Woodmen Life.
Mandy Brooks, TRMC Foundation director, at center, presents the Ilse Boyette Scholarship to students Dalton Gray and Sarah Cassell.
FAMILY, FOUNDATION OFFER
ILSE BOYETTE SCHOLARSHIP
On behalf of Henry Boyette and family, and the Tift Regional Medical Center Foundation, the Ilse Boyette Book Scholarship was recently presented to two full-time students. 

The award was established in memory of Boyette for her love of nursing and the healthcare field. 

The 2021 Ilse Boyette recipients are Sarah Cassell and Dalton GrayCassell is a fulltime student at the University of Georgia where she is a pharmaceutical science major. She has worked as a pharmacy tech at Tift Regional Medical Center for the past 18 months

Gray is a fulltime employee at Georgia Sports Medicine as a licensed practical nurse. He is attending Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College fulltime and will soon be in the Registered Nurse Bridge Program.

The scholarships are a $500 award to be used on book expenses at the school of the recipient’s choice. Funds have been made possible through the Ilse Boyette Memorial and the Tour de Tifton bike ride sponsored through the Tiftarea YMCA.
TIFTON-TIFT COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE RIBBON CUTTING
A Bag of Sweets
458 Virginia Ave. (inside Tifton Mall), Tifton
July 16
GA MUSEUM OF AGRICULTURE
HONORING LATE TIFTON LEADERS
Two late Tifton leaders will be honored July 23 at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College's Georgia Museum of Agriculture.

The Tom M. Cordell Conference Center and the Ford B. Spinks Exhibit Hall will both be dedicated in the 3 p.m. ceremony at the main exhibit hall in the museum.

“Both of these men had a tremendous impact not only on Tifton and South Georgia but on the entire state,” said ABAC President David Bridges. “Honoring them in this way is a tribute to the impression they made.”

The Tom M. Cordell Conference Center honors ABAC's longtime dean and continuing education coordinator. Recognized as “Man of the Year” by the Progressive Farmer magazine in 1971, Cordell received the Georgia Adult Education Council Citation in 1972. 

During his 39-year ABAC career, Cordell created the college's agricultural short-course program that helped to educate thousands of Georgians including President Jimmy Carter when he was a peanut farmer in Plains.

Before retiring in 1979, Cordell served as ABAC acting president on five different occasions. The ABAC Foundation created the Tom M. Cordell Distinguished Lecture Series in his honor in 1985. Cordell died in 1991.
The Ford B. Spinks Exhibit Hall recognizes an ABAC alumnus who was key to establishing the Georgia Agrirama in Tifton in 1976 and was a strong supporter of the State Museum of Agriculture when it became a part of ABAC in 2010.

A World War II veteran, Spinks served in the State Senate from 1962-1971. He served on the Georgia Public Service Commission from 1971-1989. Spinks owned and operated Tifton Tractor Co., was a director at South Georgia Banking Co., and was chairman of the Coastal Plain Area Tourism Council. In 2000, he was named to the Tifton-Tift County Chamber of Commerce Wall of Fame. He died in 2016.
TIFTON-TIFT COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
RIBBON CUTTING
Acres & Oak Kitchen
253 Brumby Way, Tifton
July 15
GEORGIA LOTTERY POSTS RECORD YEAR
The Georgia Lottery Corp. has announced its most successful year ever with historic profits generated for Georgia’s HOPE Scholarship and Pre-K programs.

The Georgia Lottery raised a record $1,544,954,000 in profits for fiscal year 2021, bringing the total to more than $23.8 billion transferred to the State Treasury’s Lottery for Education Account since the lottery's inception.

“Coming out of a difficult year, these Georgia Lottery numbers are welcomed good news for both our students and our economy,” said Gov. Brian P. Kemp.

“From Pre-K to HOPE, lottery-funded educational programs provide the groundwork for a lifetime of learning and help us retain our best and brightest students."

This marks the sixth consecutive year that the Georgia Lottery has exceeded $1 billion in profits for education, surpassing the record previously set in Fiscal Year 2020 by more than $307.6 million. This was the Lottery’s 10th consecutive year of growth in profits for education.
ABAC STUDENT ONE OF 18 IN U.S. NAMED A NATIONAL TEACH AG AMBASSADOR
Erin Pearce, a junior agricultural education major at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, is one of 18 students nationwide selected as a National Teach Ag Ambassador for the 2021-22 year.

“Serving as a National Teach Ag Ambassador is a way to encourage and inspire others to become agriculture teachers,” Pearce said. “I believe this year is going to be a whirlwind. I applied hoping that I could inspire others in the way those in the past did for me.” 

A Cairo native, Pearce found her passion for agricultural education while at Cairo High School.

“I want to give to the kids of the future what my agriculture teachers gave to me,” Pearce said. “I want to give knowledge of the industry that affects more lives than any other. I want to give a haven to those that don’t have one but also to those who do.” 

The 18 ambassadors will begin their training this summer to become advocates for agricultural education at the 94th National FFA Convention in Indianapolis on Oct. 27-30. The students will represent the National Teach Ag Campaign at the convention as they promote agricultural education as a career choice.
TIFTON GRAPEVINE'S CAT OF THE WEEK
"Spunky" is seeking a "furever" home. To find your next pet, visit the Tift County Animal Shelter from 1-6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays, or call 229-382-PETS (7387).
Pets of the Week are sponsored by:
Branch's Veterinary Clinic
205 Belmont Ave., Tifton, 229-382-6055
LEGISLATURE HEARS PROPOSAL
TO CREATE TIFT COUNTY,
JULY 20,1905
House and Senate committees of the Georgia General Assembly formally heard proposals on July 20, 1905, for creating a new county named Tift with Tifton as the county seat. Col. C.W. Fulwood of Tifton presented maps of the proposed county lines; Editor J.L. Herring of The Tifton Gazette told lawmakers that residents have been advocating for the plan for a decade; M.L. McMillan of Berrien County testified that he wanted to be in the new county because he lives closer to Tifton than Nashville; and W.E. Williams of Ty Ty said all residents of his town wish to be included within the new county.
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