June 27, 2019
Is Gen Z Different from Millennials?
From all evidence there are some notable differences between the two cohorts, while, at the same time, Gen Z exhibits some Millennial-associated characteristics – only to a greater degree.

Over at least the last half decade, hospitality marketers have been falling over themselves trying to target so-called Millennials (those born between 1980 and about 1995).
Hotel chains large and small have launched brands designed to appeal to this demographic segment. Some examples include: Marriott’s Moxy flag, the chain’s first branding concept created outside the US; Hilton’s Tru, billed as “very minimalist and modern, with a young, social vibe”; or Hyatt Centric, which features co-working spaces and open-concept lounges that encourage socialising.

Regarding these Millennial-focused concepts, generally observed trends are smaller guestrooms and more emphasis on creating convivial common areas.

What about Gen Z?
Now what can be said of the even younger cohort behind the Millennials, who are known as Generation Z (those born roughly between 1995 and 2010)? Are they the same as their older brethren or are they distinctly different? From all evidence there are some notable differences between the two cohorts, while, at the same time, Gen Z exhibits some Millennial-associated characteristics – only to a greater degree.

Local Minimum Wage Increases Effective July 1,2019

Effective July 1, 2019, several municipalities will see hikes in their minimum wage and two new local minimum wage ordinances will go into effect. This is a good time for employers to be sure that their labor posters are up to date. Many municipalities have unique notice requirements.

Minimum Wage Increases

The following cities and county will increase their minimum wage on July 1 to:
  • Berkeley: $15.59/hour.
  • Emeryville: $16.30/hour for businesses of all sizes (except for Small Independent Restaurants).
  • City of Los Angeles: $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
  • County of Los Angeles (unincorporated areas only): $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
  • Malibu: $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
  • Milpitas: $15/hour.
  • Pasadena: $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.
  • San Francisco: $15.59/hour.
  • San Leandro: $15/hour.
  • Santa Monica: $14.25/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; $13.25/hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees.

Eligibility rules may vary based on the locale.

New Minimum Wage Ordinances
Two other cities have enacted a new minimum wage ordinance that goes into effect July 1, 2019:
  • Alameda: $13.50/hour.
  • Fremont: $13.50/hour for employers with 26 or more employees; employers with 25 or fewer employees will continue to pay the state minimum wage rate until July 1, 2020.

Call the FREE CLIA Helpline at 916.925.2915 for more information about changes in minimum wage and how to buy posters with your CLIA discount.
Best Practices for an OSHA Inspection
Don’t Know What You Got (Till It’s Gone): Is OSHA Required to Give Managers and Supervisors Their Rights Before Interviewing Them?
June 24, 2019 by David Klass, Travis Vance

When an inspector from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) shows up at your workplace, know this: everything—and we mean everything—that a manager or supervisor says at any point to the inspector will bind the company and may be used against the company to support a citation. 

Two Examples
Imagine an OSHA inspector shows up at your workplace and presents his credentials to the plant manager. The opening conference begins with the OSHA inspector, the plant manager, and safety director present. The inspector explains that he has received a complaint of employee exposure to methylenedianiline (MDA) at the workplace. The complaint is vague and does not specify where in the facility the exposure occurred. Trying to be helpful and point the OSHA inspector to the right area of the facility, the safety director says, “Oh, yeah. I know the area they’re talking about. That’s in the back of the facility near where we produce the polymers. It’s a recent issue because we just changed suppliers.” 

Here’s another example: an OSHA inspector is in the middle of conducting an inspection related to a complaint of asbestos exposure concerning the removal of pipes at a facility. During the walk-through with a facility owner, the inspector discovers that a contractor’s employees worked in the area of alleged exposure. The contractor’s site superintendent is onsite and joins the walk-around inspection. When the inspector gets to the area of the alleged exposure, the contractor’s superintendent says, “We removed the pipes, but the host employer told us they had hired an asbestos removal company to abate the asbestos insulation on the pipes we removed.” 
Is there an issue with either the safety director’s or site superintendent’s comments?


Independent Hotels Special Pricing Program

At HD Supply Facilities Maintenance, we work hard to make your job easier, so you can focus on what matters—increasing operational efficiency, occupancy, and guest satisfaction. As a leading supplier to the hospitality industry, we provide the maintenance supplies, furniture, fixtures and equipment, and renovation and rebranding services you need.



California Lodging Expo® and Conference
October 21, 2019
Crowne Plaza Los Angeles - Commerce
California's Premier Lodging Trade Show

The Expo provides a unique venue for vendors, owners, operators and lodging professionals to meet and discuss the issues that impact our industry in a relaxed, yet invigorating environment. 
What Can Attendees Expect?

Certification Workshops:
  • Human Trafficking Awareness and Education certification presented by Leavitt Pacific Insurance, satisfies the Califronia legal requirement.
  • Has Governor Newsom Changed the Game?: A Legislative and Employment Law Review presented by John Mavros of Fisher Phillips
  • Workplace Sexual Harassment Training for Managers presented by Andrew Sommer of Conn Maciel Carey, meets the sexual harassment training requirements in California 
  • Are You Ready for 2020? Panel discussion with four industry experts who will share their insights on preparing for the future.
Fun:
  • Grand Prize Drawing
  • Cash Prizes Drawings
  • Getaway and Prize Drawings
  • Free Wine Tasting
  • Evening Reception
  • Networking, Networking, Networking

Thank You To Our Expo Sponsors
Workers' Compensation Action Network 
Town Hall and Summit
FEATURING
Stephen Wagstaffe
San Mateo County District Attorney 
Teena Barton, Senior Fraud Investigator, ICW Group
Friday, July 26, 2019 
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Angelicas
863 Main Street - Redwood City, CA 94063
Why Crack Down on Workers' Comp Fraud?
 
Fraud hurts both employers and injured workers. It inflates employer costs, clogs the injured workers' compensation court and administrative systems, delays the resolution of claims, diverts limited system resources, and exploits injured workers who do not receive the medical care needed to property heal from their injuries. 

We Appreciate Our CLIA Sponsors
Click icon to hear Glenn's latest informative and entertaining podcast!
(916) 925-2915
1017 L Street #527
Sacramento, CA 95814-3805