March 15, 2017
Table of Contents:

Call for Papers - 2017 Black Women and Girls Symposium

Theme: Black Girls and Women: Standing Up and Talking Back

You are invited to submit proposals for presentation at the 2nd Annual Collaborative Research Group on Black Women and Girls Symposium (
http://bwgsymposium.org/call-for-papers/ ), September 8-9, 2017. This interdisciplinary symposium is intended to bring together a wide spectrum of participants including, but not limited to academics, activists and artists to examine the ways in which Black girls and women negotiate and/or resist the various institutions, practices and ideologies that contribute to their marginalization. Black girls and women's' gender and race (among other identity markers) make them particularly vulnerable to social and cultural discrimination. However, Black girls and women across the African diaspora have historically found ways within and outside of dominant white male society to not only survive, but to challenge the structures that exclude them. These strategies of survival and resistance take various forms, including silence and "acting out", non-conforming dress and body aesthetic, critical writing and storytelling, critical pedagogy, and organizing.

We are seeking individual papers, full panels and interactive workshops that address this theme of black girls and women's speaking up. We are soliciting work, academic and nonacademic, that looks at Black girls and women in the Africa, Caribbean, Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. (among other regions). Below, we offer the following list of possible topics for exploration, but we encourage you to use your imagination on the general theme of the symposium: Black girls and women performing beauty
  • Art as a means of disrupting whiteness, patriarchy, and/or classism
  • Creative writing as a form of standing up and talking back
  • Black girls and women resisting criminalization
  • Critical race-gender pedagogy
  • Mothering black girls; radical mothering
  • Immigrant black girls and women negotiating "new" geographies
  • Black girls and women's standing up outside of the US
  • Community action for social justice
  • Loving and self-nurturing as talking back
  • Black girls and women "acting up" in literature
  • Resisting black girls' marginalization in schools
  • Healing practices
  • Dance, movement
Submission Guidelines

We are accepting proposals for individual academic papers and readings (each lasting 15­-20 minutes) and full panels, participatory workshops and roundtable discussions (3­-4 participants, each lasting 60 minutes). We especially welcome participatory workshops. Proposals should consist of a single Word file containing the following:
  1. Presenter(s) name, email address, and institutional affiliation (if relevant)
  2. Title of presentation
  3. Abstract (300 words for individual papers and presentations. 500 words for full panels, workshops and roundtables on targeted issues or topics)
  1. Format of presentation
  2. Anticipated AV needs and any other logistical or technical requirements
  3. A brief biographical information of presenter(s) or one­ page CV (please do not send a full CV)
Send proposals by April 10, 2017 (using "Standing Up"_YourName in the subject line) to: The Collaborative Research Group on Black Women and Girls Symposium Planning Committee:  BWGSymposium@gmail.com

Organized by:
  • Julia Jordan-Zachery, Ph.D.
  • Kamille Gentles-Peart, Ph.D.
  • Maiyah Rivers
  • Shamara Alhassan
  • Emerald Ortiz
  • Makeen Zachery
**The Symposium is free to attend! If you are interested in helping to underwrite the 2017 Symposium please contact us at:  bwgsymposium@gmail.com **




Call for Chapters in English for Edited Volume: Rethinking Childhoods in Africa: An Anthology

Publisher: Vernon Press
 
Initiators/Editors: 
  1. Prof. Charles Quist-Adade, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, BC, Canada
  2. Prof. De-Valera Botchway, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.
  3. Dr. Awo Abena Amoa Sarpong, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.
For this edited volume, we hope to have a coherent congregation of chapters presenting original research that focuses on the psychology, sociology and history of the condition of childhood in Africa. We intend to move away from the traditional examination of the child solely, to the exploration of childhood in Africa. We are also interested in the different rationalisations and conceptions of childhood, a diversity of aspects and ramifications of childhoods, from purely African and Africa centred perspectives.
 
The enquiry into aspects of childhood, such as childhood belongings, and the cultures of childhood, has been most amplified in countries in the Global North of Europe and North America in recent times. Africa has a large youth population and children make up a significant percentage of that demography. Yet the study about childhoods in Africa is still in its nascency. Worse, the scholarly studies of the life of children in Africa have mostly looked at children as victims of social injustice and exploitation and persons living on the peripheries of the world of adults. But there are more regions, surprisingly happy and hope-giving ones, worth interrogating. These include creative expression in childhood, perceptions of happiness in childhood, childhood versus adultism, childhood spirituality, hijacked childhoods and brave negotiations of safe havens for self-expression, and child(ren) constructed understandings of the African childhood.
The edited volume will bring together the composite analyses and interpretations and stories and case studies about various aspects of childhood in Africa by scholars who focus on African society, culture, education and history. It will investigate childhood and the child(ren) actor(s) across different stages of personhood development, and times and spaces on the African continent.
 
The editors encourage contributors to submit works that are more inclined to the sociological and historical approaches of inquiry and analysis.The editors also seek works that approach the subject of childhoods in Africa from the interdisciplinary perspective.  Thus, contributors can come from different areas such as Childhood Studies, Psychology, Education, Sociology, Human Relations, Cultural Studies, African History, African/a Studies, Postcolonial Studies, Philosophy, Humanitarian and Social Work.
 
It is envisaged that contributions for the chapters will be drawn from studies that look at broad subthemes that concern different aspects of childhood in Africa. The broad subthemes and areas, which the editors are interested in include, but are not limited to,
  • Childhood in Africa: the Experience of Birth and Coming to a Family
  • Childhood in Africa: The Body Experience in Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: Childhoods constructed around given Names/ Childhoods of Unnamed Children
  • Childhood in Africa: Languages and Cultures Mediating Belonging in Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: Learning Responsibility and Service
  • Childhood in Africa: The Creative Negotiation of Harmonious Co-Existence of Divergent Beliefs of the Individual Child and Convergent Group Beliefs
  • Childhood in Africa: Play, Play Worlds and Social Learning
  • Childhood in Africa: Childhoods Marked and Unmarked by Ritual and Rites of Passage
  • Childhood in Africa: Eccentric, Ill-adjusted, Misfit and Evil Childhoods
  • Childhood in Africa: The Disabled and Vulnerable Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: The Schooling Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: Coming of Age, Sexual Identification and Confrontations with Sex
  • Childhood in Africa: Digital Technologies and Conceptions of Self and Community in the African Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: Health and Wellness in Spirit, Mind, Soul and Body
  • Childhood in Africa: Identity-building in Multi-cultural and Multi-national Contexts of Living, Moving and Surviving
  • Childhood in Africa: Gangs, Secret Societies, and Forbidden Associations
  • Childhood in Africa: The modern dilemma of being a Child and a Parent
  • Childhood in Africa: Dealing with Social Isolation
  • Childhood in Africa: The Creative and Artistic Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: Food, Nutrition and Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: Rural and Urban Working Childhoods
  • Childhood in Africa: Mass Media and Self-Identification in Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: Children's Notions of Childhood
  • Childhood in Africa: Hijacked Childhoods and Confrontations with Adultism
  • Childhood in Africa: Sports and Games-shaped Childhoods
  • Studies of diverse notions and theories of childhood across Africa
Important Dates:
  • Submission of abstracts and drafts: March to 15th May 2017.
  • Review of abstracts and papers: 15th May to 1st July 2017
  • Editing and submission of First Draft: 1st July to 20th August 2017
  • Submission of Final Draft: 20th August to 30th September 2017
  • Papers go to the publisher:  3rd October 2017
  • Publication: November 2017  
Only works which have not been published before will be considered. Each abstract will be reviewed by the editors, and the papers will go through a full peer review procedure. Submitted papers should be in Word, and saved as .DOC or .DOCX files. They should use footnotes and follow the Chicago or Harvard Styles of referencing. Use UK English spellings and punctuation except when quoting from a source that has used another English style. Provide translations (your own, or the standard, if there is a printed translation available) of all material in languages other than English. The translations should be incorporated into the text, following the foreign term or foreign selection.

Please submit a 400 word abstract, and your manuscript which should be between 7000 to 8000 words, and a 300-400 word academic biography including your qualifications, area(s) of research interest and relevant recent publications as an email attachment with "Childhoods in Africa Book" in the subject line to the editors:
Please direct requests for any additional information to the editors via the email addresses provided above.




Call for Chapters in English for Edited Volume: "In the Name of God?" Religious Fundamentalism in Africa.
 
Publisher: Vernon Press
 
Initiators/Editors: 
  1. Prof. Charles Quist-Adade, Kwantlen Polytechnic University, Surrey, BC, Canada
  2. Prof. De-Valera Botchway, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.
  3. Dr. Awo Abena Amoa Sarpong, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.
For this edited volume, we are hoping for a coherent ensemble of chapters presenting original research on the phenomenon of religious fundamentalism in Africa. The notions of religion and fundamentalism are a dangerous mix the world over.  Africa is no exception.  From Nigeria to Sudan, from Mali to the Gambia, Central African Republic, and from Egypt to Swaziland, religious fundamentalist-inspired conflicts have left in their trail death and destruction.  The most recent notorious religious conflicts are in Nigeria and Sudan.  According to the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, "since 1999, a disturbingly large number of Nigerians, 12,000, if not more, have been killed in sectarian and communal attacks and reprisals between Muslims and Christians." [1]

The fundamental belief that one religion or a sect in a religion or a society that identifies with a particular religious worldview has absolute knowledge of the absolute truth and therefore all other groups and sects must conform to the ways of that group has been a basic recipe for all sorts of antagonism and conflicts between religious groups and societies globally and in Africa. Whether produced by the pursuit of religious exclusivism or inclusivism or universalism, or fanned by doctrinal differences or political aims and goals, the antagonism has often yielded violence inspired by religious fundamentalism and aggression globally. The ramifications of religious fundamentalism in Africa are many and far reaching. 
 
Thus, this volume aims to deliver fresh perspectives on this religious phenomenon as it has manifested and influenced lives and shaped society in Africa.  By combining international and interdisciplinary contributions the book seeks to congregate the composite analyses and documented experiences of religious fundamentalism in Africa recounted by scholars who focus on African society, culture, politics and history. It will investigate the plethora of ways that religious fundamentalism has negotiated, mediated, disturbed, deconstructed, or constructed social, political and economic canons and interactions across different times and spaces on the African continent.
The editors encourage contributors to submit works that are more inclined to the sociological and historical approaches of inquiry and analysis.The editors also seek works that approach the subject of religious fundamentalism in Africa from the interdisciplinary perspective.
 
It is envisaged that contributions for the chapters will be drawn from studies that look at broad subthemes that concern different aspects of religious fundamentalism in Africa.
The broad subthemes and areas which the editors are interested in include, but not limited to,
  • Sociological analysis of religion and society in Africa
  • Historical Exploration of Fundamentalism
  • The nexus of Philosophies of History and Religious Fundamentalism
  • What is Religious Fundamentalism?
  • Religious Fundamentalism in Africa - A General Overview
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Children in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Human Rights and Responsibility in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Women in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Migration in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Refugees in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism in Africa and the Continental and International Media
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Indigenous Knowledge Systems in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Heritage Sites and Conservation in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Food Security in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Indigenous African Spirituality and Worldview
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Politics in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Sustainable Development in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and Globalization in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and the West in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism and the Arab World in Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism Case Studies: North Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism Case Studies: East Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism Case Studies: West Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism Case Studies: Central Africa
  • Religious Fundamentalism Case Studies: South Africa
 
Important Dates:
  • Submission of abstracts and drafts: March to 15th May 2017.
  • Review of abstracts and papers: 15th May to July 2017
  • Editing and submission of First Draft: July to Mid August 2017
  • Submission of Final Draft: Mid August to September 2017
  • Papers go to the publisher: September to October 2017
  • Publication: November 2017  
Only works which have not been published before will be considered. Each abstract will be reviewed by the editors, and the papers will go through a full peer review procedure. Submitted papers should be in Word, and saved as .DOC or .DOCX files. They should use footnotes and follow the Chicago or Harvard Styles of referencing. Use UK English spellings and punctuation except when quoting from a source that has used another English style. Provide translations (your own, or the standard, if there is a printed translation available) of all material in languages other than English. The translations should be incorporated into the text, following the foreign term or foreign selection.

Please submit a 400 word abstract, and your manuscript which should be between 7000 to 8000 words, and a 300-400 word academic biography including your qualifications, area(s) of interest and relevant recent publications as an email attachment with "Religious Fundamentalism Book" in the subject line to the editors:
All enquiries should also be directed to the editors via the email addresses provided above.


[1] USCIRF Comment on State Dept. Religious Freedom Report http://www.uscirf.gov/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=2804 . Retrieved on March 2, 2015.



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