Vice President for Research & Economic Development
Proposal Services & Faculty Support
May Funding Focus Newsletter #2
What is a Limited Submission?
A limited submission solicitation (RFA, RFP, etc.) places a cap on the number of proposals that Auburn may submit to a sponsor. Auburn coordinates limited submissions by sending out a notification via this newsletter and creating competitions in the Auburn University Competition Space (also known as InfoReady ).To apply to any limited submission posted below, click on the above link and search for your competition reflected on the page. Please refer to the Limited Submission Procedures page for a list of requirements.
Limited Submission Announcements

The NSF INCLUDES Big Idea is a comprehensive national initiative to enhance U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations focused on NSF's commitment to diversity, inclusion, and broadening participation in these fields. The vision of NSF INCLUDES is to catalyze the STEM enterprise to work collaboratively for inclusive change, resulting in a STEM workforce that reflects the population of the Nation. More specifically, NSF INCLUDES seeks to improve collaborative efforts aimed at enhancing the preparation, increasing the participation, and ensuring the contributions of individuals from groups that have been historically underrepresented and underserved in the STEM enterprise such as African Americans, Alaska Natives, Hispanics, Native Americans, Native Hawaiians, Native Pacific Islanders, persons with disabilities, persons from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, and women and girls. Significant advancement in the inclusion of underrepresented groups in STEM will result in a new generation of STEM talent and leadership to secure our nation’s future and long-term economic competitiveness.

Institutional Limit: 1 Proposal
Internal Deadline: May 29, 2020, 4:45pm

To encourage a commitment to breast cancer research, Breast Cancer Alliance invites clinical doctors and research scientists whose primary focus is breast cancer and who are in the early stages of their careers, to apply for funding for the Young Investigator Grant. This grant is open to applicants at institutions throughout the contiguous United States. This is a two-year grant for a total of $125,000, with half the grant award being paid out each year.

Applicants for the 2021 award must (i) have not held a faculty position for more than four years following completion of their training, as of March 1, 2021; (ii) have not been a principal investigator on an NIH R01 or equivalent national/international non-mentored award; and (iii) dedicate at least 50% of their work effort to research. This grant is intended to help advance the careers of young researchers who do not yet have their own major grant support but who design and conduct their own independent research projects.
Institutional Limit: 2 Proposals
Internal Deadline: May 22, 2020, 4:45pm

In this solicitation, the NSF ADVANCE program seeks to build on prior NSF ADVANCE work and other research and literature concerning gender, racial, and ethnic equity. The NSF ADVANCE program goal is to broaden the implementation of evidence-based systemic change strategies that promote equity for STEM faculty in academic workplaces and the academic profession. The NSF ADVANCE program provides grants to enhance the systemic factors that support equity and inclusion and to mitigate the systemic factors that create inequities in the academic profession and workplaces. Systemic (or organizational) inequities may exist in areas such as policy and practice as well as in organizational culture and climate. For example, practices in academic departments that result in the inequitable allocation of service or teaching assignments may impede research productivity, delay advancement, and create a culture of differential treatment and rewards. Similarly, policies and procedures that do not mitigate implicit bias in hiring, tenure, and promotion decisions could lead to women and racial and ethnic minorities being evaluated less favorably, perpetuating historical under-participation in STEM academic careers and contributing to an academic climate that is not inclusive.
All NSF ADVANCE proposals are expected to use intersectional approaches in the design of systemic change strategies in recognition that gender, race and ethnicity do not exist in isolation from each other and from other categories of social identity. The solicitation includes four funding tracks: Institutional Transformation (IT), Adaptation, Partnership, and Catalyst , in support of the NSF ADVANCE program goal to broaden the implementation of systemic strategies that promote equity for STEM faculty in academic workplaces and the academic profession.
  • The Institutional Transformation (IT) track is designed to support the development, implementation, and evaluation of innovative systemic change strategies that promote gender equity for STEM faculty within an institution of higher education.
  • The Adaptation track is designed to support the work to adapt, implement, and evaluate evidence-based systemic change strategies that have been shown to promote gender equity for STEM faculty in academic workplaces and the academic profession. Adaptation projects can either: 1) support the adaptation of evidence-based systemic change strategies to promote equity for STEM faculty within an institution of higher education; or 2) facilitate national or regional STEM disciplinary transformation by adapting evidence-based systemic change strategies to non-profit, non-academic organizations.
  • The Partnership track is designed to support the work to facilitate the broader adaptation of gender equity and systemic change strategies. Partnership projects are expected to result in national or regional transformation in STEM academic workplaces and the academic profession and demonstrate significant reach. Partnership projects can focus on the transformation of institutions and organizations and/or the transformation within one or more STEM disciplines.
  • The Catalyst track is designed to broaden the types of IHEs that are able to undertake data collection and institutional self-assessment work to identify systemic gender inequities impacting their STEM faculty so that these can be addressed by the institution.

Institutional Limit: 1 Proposal
Internal Deadline: May 29, 2020, 4:45pm
IMPORTANT UPDATES
NEH Summer Stipend Applications Available

Auburn University can nominate two applicants for NEH Summer Stipends (summer 2021). Dr. Paula Backscheider is head of the five-person committee that selects our nominees. Last year we had several competitive applicants, and we hope to have another successful cycle. 
 
Summer Stipends carry an award of $6000 for scholarly projects including books, articles, digital materials, translations, editions and other scholarly resources.
 
Applicants should read the NEH guidelines carefully and submit an electronic copy of a polished draft of the NEH application form to the Auburn NEH Committee by the deadline:  5:00 p.m., 10 July 2020.  The official form is available on the NEH Summer Stipends website .
 
The application is composed of
The cover sheet
3-page narrative
1 page bibliography (which should demonstrate preparation for the project)
2-page resume (in editing the full resume, proof of competence for the project should be a priority)
Appendices if relevant
 
Applications should be submitted to Ginny Clary at vsc0004@auburn.edu , who will be collecting them and coordinating with the committee this summer. The committee will make its selections after that and will work with the selected nominees to refine their proposals by 16 August. The NEH deadline is 23 September 2020. NEH accepts applications only from those nominated by their university or organization.

Hanover Research Queue has Openings Available for Proposal Review after June 5th
 
In order to provide resources for faculty and staff, Auburn University has partnered with Hanover Research for a number of grant development solutions including: Pre-proposal Support; Proposal Development; and Capacity Building. Their full-service grant development solutions are available to set goals, build strategies to achieve key grantseeking objectives, and develop grant proposals that are well-planned, researched, and written. For information regarding Hanover’s core capabilities and project time lines, click here . If you are interested in a slot in the queue, please e-mail Tony Ventimiglia ( ventiaf@auburn.edu ).


Starting June 1st, 2020 the updated requirements will go into effect.


NSF recently recorded a webinar about the requirement to use an NSF-approved format for both the biographical sketch and current & pending support documents as part of proposals submitted to NSF. The policy, outlined in the NSF Proposal and Award Policies and Procedures Guide (PAPPG) (NSF 20-1), goes into effect for proposals submitted or due, on or after June 1, 2020. The two NSF-approved formats are SciENcv: Science Experts Network Curriculum Vitae, and an NSF Fillable PDF. 


  • You must use FORMS-F forms for grant application due dates on or after May 25, 2020 and FORMS-E for due dates on or before May 24, 2020. If you aren’t sure what an application package “Competition ID” is or where to find it, check out Do I Have the Right Form Version For My Application?
  • The biosketchdata table, and other format pages have also been updated with FORMS-F versions. Format pages are approved formats to be used with specific grant application attachments.
As information is being shared by sponsors, it is being collected/posted here so please check back often for updates.
FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

The IUCRC program provides a structure for academic researchers to conduct fundamental, pre-competitive research of shared interest to industry and government organizations. These organizations pay membership fees to a consortium so that they can collectively envision and fund research, with at least 90% of Member funds allocated to the direct costs of these shared research projects.

IUCRCs are formed around research areas of strategic interest to U.S. industry. Industry is defined very broadly to include companies (large and small), startups and non-profit organizations. Principal Investigators form a Center around emerging research topics of current research interest, in a pre-competitive space but with clear pathways to applied research and commercial development. Industry partners join at inception, as an existing Center grows or they inspire the creation of a new Center by recruiting university partners to leverage NSF support. Government agencies participate in IUCRCs as Members or by partnering directly with NSF at the strategic level.

Universities, academic researchers, and students benefit from IUCRC participation through the research funding, the establishment and growth of industry partnerships, and educational and career placement opportunities for students. Industry Members benefit by accessing knowledge, facilities, equipment, and intellectual property in a highly cost-efficient model; leveraging Center research outcomes in their future proprietary projects; interacting in an informal, collaborative way with other private sector and government entities with shared interests; and identifying and recruiting talent. NSF provides funding to support Center administrative costs and a governance framework to manage membership, operations, and evaluation.

Successful IUCRCs require:
  • A capable research/management team with an entrepreneurial mindset;
  • Universities, faculty, and students interested in engaging in research of interest to industry;
  • A community of industry partners seeking pre-competitive, use-inspired research projects.

Each IUCRC is expected to grow and become independently sustainable by the end of the NSF support.

Preliminary Proposals Due: July 7, 2020 5pm (Central)

The Discovery Research PreK-12 program (DRK-12) seeks to significantly enhance the learning and teaching of science, technology, engineering, mathematics and computer science (STEM) by preK-12 students and teachers, through research and development of STEM education innovations and approaches. Projects in the DRK-12 program build on fundamental research in STEM education and prior research and development efforts that provide theoretical and empirical justification for proposed projects. Projects should result in research-informed and field-tested outcomes and products that inform teaching and learning. Teachers and students who participate in DRK-12 studies are expected to enhance their understanding and use of STEM content, practices and skills.

The DRK-12 program invites proposals that address immediate challenges that are facing preK-12 STEM education as well as those that anticipate radically different structures and functions of preK-12 teaching and learning. The DRK-12 program has three major research and development strands: (1) Assessment; (2) Learning; and (3) Teaching. The program recognizes the synergy among the three strands and that there is some overlap and interdependence among them. However, proposals should identify a clear focus of the proposed research efforts (i.e., assessment, learning, or teaching) consistent with the proposal’s main objectives and research questions. The program supports six types of projects: (1) Exploratory, (2) Design and Development, (3) Impact, (4) Implementation and Improvement, (5) Syntheses, and (6) Conferences. All six types of projects apply to each of the three DRK-12 program strands.

Applications Due: October 7 2020 5pm (Eastern)

The office of Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) recently released Fiscal Year 2020 (FY20) funding opportunities for the Department of Defense (DoD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP), Melanoma Research Program (MRP), Multiple Sclerosis Research Program (MSRP), and Neurofibromatosis Research Program (NFRP).

Facebook is pleased to invite university faculty to respond to this call for research proposals on exploring unique challenges, threats, attacks, mitigations, and other considerations in the burgeoning space of AR, VR, and smart devices.
We believe in “trust” and trustworthiness as suitable terms for encompassing security, privacy, integrity, and ethics in the products and platforms we build. More and more unique products, use cases, and devices are coming to bear in this new space. It follows that with an entirely new category of technologies come entirely new possibilities and models for considering trust.
Facebook is soliciting proposals to help accelerate research in these fields with the hope of helping to foster a world of trustworthy mixed-reality and smart device products. There are fairly robust research fields in traditional computing paradigms from cloud to mobile, and we hope to drive similar progress in the fields of AR/VR.
We are interested in a broad range of topics relating to applications like AR glasses, VR headsets, other AR or VR form-factors, smart home products, and more. Examples might include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • Novel threats, attacks, mitigations, or features in the areas of silicon, hardware, supply-chain, or anti-tamper in this space
  • Privacy-preserving techniques and engineering in the context of unique sensors and use cases
  • Developments involving trust in voice assistants, smart devices, smart home cameras, biometrics, and so on
  • Proposed operating system, platform, or device system concepts that offer improvements in the technological space
  • Novel concepts in terms of identity, authentication, authorization, abuse-prevention, and more, as they pertain to said devices and technologies
  • Perspectives on unique ethical or societal considerations and challenges posed by this technology, and suggested mitigations
  • Any novel or new concepts in trust as applied to the AR/VR and smart devices space that warrant further exploration
Applicants should submit a proposal detailing what contribution their research is expected to make, how the research domain will benefit from the work, a project timeline, and a budget overview of how the proposed funding will be used. Proposals are highly encouraged to focus funding of project personnel, especially PhD students. Proposals from small collaborative teams, particularly with PIs bridging necessary technical areas, are also encouraged.
A total of up to four awards are available, up to $75,000 each, depending on the specific requirements. Payment will be made to the proposer’s host university as an unrestricted gift.

Applications Due: June 12, 2020

The Vilcek Foundation will award three Creative Promise Prizes of $50,000 each to young foreign-born biomedical scientists who demonstrate outstanding early achievement. Eligible work may be in basic, applied, and/or translational biomedical science.

Eligibility Requirements:
  • Applicant must have been born outside the United States;
  • Applicant must not be more than 38 years old as of December 31, 2020 (born on or after January 1, 1982);
  • Applicant must: be a naturalized citizen or permanent resident (green card holder) of the United States; be a holder of an H1B or O-1 visa and have been living and working in the United States for at least 5 years; or have been granted Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) relief;
  • Applicant must have earned a doctoral degree (MD, PhD, or equivalent);
  • Applicant must hold a full-time position at an academic institution or other organization. Eligible positions include the following: assistant or associate professor, or equivalent independent position. The applicant must be directly responsible for the design and execution of the work submitted for consideration. Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows working under the supervision of a mentor are not eligible;
  • Applicant must intend to pursue a professional career in the United States;
  • Applicant must not be a past winner of the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise.

Applications Due: June 10, 2020 5pm (Eastern)
Proposal Services & Faculty Support
844-5929 / c ls0071@auburn.edu