Melissa Boctor is a Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner that has devoted herself to the art, science and clinical craft of optimizing Women’s wellness. Before joining us as a practicing Nurse Practitioner, she worked with us for two years counseling, educating, and triaging patients, coordinating patient centered care among a team of practitioners and outside care networks.

Melissa graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Pennsylvania and is a member of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honors Society. She completed an array of clinical rotations across several renowned institutions, some of which include UPENN Breast Specialty Center, UPENN OBGYN, and Lankenau Labor and Delivery.

Melissa is thrilled to practice at RWWC and hopes that during her time here she is able to empower and advocate for women clinically, socially, and politically.
­­­­Abigail Kienzle Schultz is a board certified Family Nurse Practitioner. She joins us from the CVS Minute Clinic where she would assess, diagnose and treat a variety of acute and chronic medical conditions. Abby graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with her Bachelor of Science in Nursing and continued her education at the University of Pennsylvania to gain her Master of Science in Nursing. Abby is well versed in preventative care services, point of care testing and recording patient data.

Abby wants to let you know: “I am so excited to join the amazing team of providers at RWWC and look forward to building relationships with patients and working with them to achieve their personal health goals for years to come.”
IT'S FLU SEASON - GET YOUR SHOT TODAY!
The span of time in which the influenza virus is at its most contagious is widely referred to as “ flu season .” This period generally occurs during the colder months of the year: fall and winter. Influenza activity often begins to increase in October and November and typically peaks between December and February, and can last as late as May.

IF YOU HAVE NOT GOTTEN YOUR FLU SHOT PLEASE CALL OUR OFFICE TO SCHEDULE AT 215-735-7992. WE CAN GET YOU IN AS SOON AS THE NEXT DAY.
HPV and why you should be vaccinated
By: Melissa Boctor, WHNP-BC
The human papilloma virus (HPV) is common in 80% of sexually active men and women. HPV is contracted by skin to skin contact regardless of sexual orientation or practice. There are 100 strains (types) of HPV; 14 of which are potentially cancer-causing, and each new sexual partner can spread a different HPV strain.

The human papilloma virus enters cells and causes them to change over time. Our body’s immune system can normally clear the HPV virus within 1-2 years. However, some people have a harder time clearing the virus than others. When HPV lingers over a long period of time it has the potential to cause several types of cancer. According to the CDC the HPV vaccine (Gardasil 9) can offer protection from 6 different types of cancer: cervical cancer and cervical precancer, oropharyngeal cancer, anal cancer, vulva and vaginal cancer, and penile cancer.

As research has progressed into 2019 the FDA and CDC have found that there are benefits for receiving the HPV vaccine under the age of 46. According to the CDC 34,800 women and men are diagnosed per year with cancer caused by HPV. The vaccine, however, can reduce this prevalence of HPV-related cancers by up to 90%. However, the HPV vaccine does not offer protection against low risk HPV strains like genital warts. At this time not all medical insurance plans are covering the vaccination between the ages of 27-45, but clinicians are hopeful that the vaccine will cover those individuals by 2020. If you have more questions about the Gardasil 9 vaccine you should talk to your healthcare provider and make sure this choice is right for your health.
IMPORTANT OFFICE INFORMATION

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We do not want you to disregard our call because it is an unfamiliar number.

215-735-7992

NOVEMBER HOURS
Monday: 8am-8pm
Tuesday: 8am-8pm
Wednesday: 8am-8pm
Thursday: 8am-8pm
Friday: 8am-4pm
Saturday: 9am-2pm
Sunday: CLOSED