Spring Share #1
My Fine Homestead Newsletter
4/11/2018






In This Issue:


  1. Announcements
  2. Your Box this Week
  3. Vegetable spotlight on Microgreens
  4. Recipe - Parmesan & Ricotta Cheese Pizza with Pistachios, Bacon, & Microgreens
  5. On the Farm . . .






(Sign of spring - violets growing in tunnel)




Announcements

This is the first Spring Share!

Mark your calendar -
the remaining spring pickup dates are: April 25, May 9 & 23.

Spring Green Farmers Market dates:
April 14 & 28 (library Community Room
from 9 to noon )
every Saturday May 12 to Oct 20 in Library Lot

2018 CSA Shares are available now.
Join our farm for the Year or for a season.
Sign up today so you don't miss out!
Your Box 
Spinach - 1/2 l b (Reminder that the stems are just as tasty -if not more - than the leaves!)
Microgreen Mix - small bag, add these to salads, or put on sandwiches,pitas, burritos
Lettuce - small butterheads
Chives - 1 bunch
Parsley - 1 bunch
Vegetable Spotlight on   Microgreens

Frequently called "vegetable confetti," microgreens are young, tender greens that are used to enhance the color, texture, or flavor of salads, or to garnish a wide variety of main dishes.

Harvested with the stem, cotyledons (seed leaves), and sometimes the first true leaves attached, they are among a variety of novel salad greens available on the market that are typically distinguished categorically by their size and age.

While they’ve been available for quite some time in health food stores and some specialty farmers markets, microgreens have recently become more widely available in large supermarkets. Their increasing popularity is due partly to their ability to pack a lot of flavor in a small amount, as well as their flexibility in being included in a dish. Mix them to create a small, flavorful and delicately textured salad, or use only one or two greens to give a plate a final touch.

Microgreens, in addition to their strong flavors, are also lauded for their health benefits, which can vary depending on the type of microgreen.
 
Types

 Microgreens are most commonly harvested from leafy greens such as kale, arugula, beet greens, onions, radish greens, watercress, chard and bok choy and herbs such as cilantro, basil, chervil, parsley and chives. The taste of microgreens depends on the original vegetable. Microgreens have a very strong and concentrated taste of the original vegetable. This means that cilantro microgreens will still taste of cilantro but in a stronger, more vegetal and condensed format. The health benefits of microgreens are similar to those of sprouts; however, the specific nutritional profile for each microgreen depends on the type of plant it comes from originally.

Greens Versus Sprouts

Microgreens differ from sprouts because sprouts are grown only using water, whereas microgreens are grown with soil. Microgreens absorb minerals from the soil as they grow, increasing their nutritional content. Because microgreens undergo more photosynthesis than sprouts, they develop more nutrients. Microgreens are further developed than sprouts and have a slightly higher fiber content.

Nutrients and Health Benefits

The nutritional profile of each microgreen depends greatly on the type of microgreen you are eating. Leafy greens are a good source of beta-carotene as well as iron and calcium. Dark green leafy vegetables such as kale and chard are also high in lutein and zeaxanthin.


Storage & Eating Ideas

Microgreen will keep for a week or more in a loosely closed plastic bag in your refrigerator.

Microgreens are too tender to cook, but that doesn't limit the ways they can be eaten! Include in vegetable salads, tortillas, pitas, burritos, sandwiches, on burgers, bagels, toast or pizza (add after cooking pizza), garnish eggs of any kind: scrambled, omelet, quiche, deviled, even fried. 
Recipe



Parmesan & Ricotta Cheese
Pizza with
Pistachios, Bacon, &
Microgreens




Ingredients
(or pre-made pizza crust)
1/2 Cup Ricotta Cheese
1/2 Cup Parmesan Cheese, Grated
2 Tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/2 teaspoon Pepper, Fresh Ground
1/4 teaspoon Sea Salt
1/4 Cup Pistachios, Chopped
4 Strips Applewood Smoked Bacon, Sliced into 1-2″ strips
1/2 Cup Micro Greens

Directions
Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. Prepare the dough and sprinkle a small amount of corn meal on a pizza stone or baking pizza pan to prevent the pizza from sticking. In a bowl combine together the Ricotta, Parmesan, Olive Oil, Sea Salt and Pepper, mix well then place the mixture atop of the prepared pizza dough. Then layer with the Bacon and half of the Pistachios.
Bake the Pizza for 14-18 minutes until the dough is browned and the bacon is crispy.

Before serving garnish with the remaining Pistachios and the Micro Greens.
On the Farm . . . 
Welcome to new members starting with this first spring box!

I know, I know, the calendar says it's April, but the weather outside doesn't seem to be paying attention.

This past weekend we woke to snow covering everything, and it sounds like we may again this weekend!

The warm weather we enjoyed a few weeks ago made us hopeful for an early spring but this cold, snowy weather is certainly the opposite of that.
The H-tractor covered in April??? snow.
We have flats of vegetables waiting to be planted out in the fields, but ground temperature is too cold - so we wait. Worried about the cost of heating the bigger seed-starting greenhouse, we are filling the smaller one (off the side of the house to take advantage of that heat) to its maximum.

Bill's adding amendments to the soil and planning to put some lettuce, radish, and salad turnip seeds in the ground before the forecasted cold weekend weather.

But we are getting antsy! We want to move ahead faster. You know the saying, "patience is a virtue"? I think we may be failing our virtue practice right now!
Bill showing harvesting spinach in one of our low tunnels.
Aidan is anxious for the pastures to green up so he can get the animals out in them.

Yesterday when he saw the grass and weeds growing up between vegetable beds under the tunnels, he decided to harvest a treat for our livestock.

And being Aidan - he made it into a video story. Enjoy watching our animals enjoying their green treat!
Have a great week,

Stacey
  Website | CSA | Contact Us | Farm B log