NOVEMBER 2018 

NOTE:  Due to the Christmas Holiday, the Falmouth Support Group meeting scheduled for Monday, December 24th is cancelled.
                   
Also due to Christmas,  the Wellfleet Support Group will meet on Tuesday, December 18th at Preservation Hall, 6-7:30 p.m.  Please contact the NAMI office with any questions.


                                              New Bay Cove Crisis Line Phone #
                                    As of July 1, 2018, the 24-hr Bay Cove Crisis Line was changed to:
                                                                         833 BAY-COVE (229-2683)

From the desk of Jackie Lane, Executive Director  NAMI CC&I 


This month I asked psychiatrist Dr. James McGuire, a valued member of our NAMI CC&I Board of Directors, to address the emotional stress many of us feel at the holidays. Somehow, we are led to believe that we need to meet all the expectations of celebration that abound in our media. When all is said and done, I have come to the conclusion that the best celebration is one that brings families and friends together to celebrate the positives in our lives and to help each other shoulder the negatives.
 
Dr. McGuire, who has the ability to express ideas in a unique and challenging way, has expanded on this theme, challenging us all to concentrate on the really important things and not to get so caught up in the seasonal frenzy that we neglect our valuable personal relationships.
 
Thank you Dr. McGuire for your very compelling and helpful thoughts!
 
Peace and best wishes from the staff of NAMI CC&I,
 
Jackie Lane, Executive Director






Some Thoughts on the Holiday Season
by
  Dr. James P.D. McGuire


 The fall and winter seasons are times for reflection and renewal. 

Many winters ago, I was at Green airport outside of Providence. It was mid-December. As I stepped out of the physical warmth of the airport, I began to shiver in a winter drizzle waiting for a cab. Standing there I noticed a young mother nursing and singing to her infant on the nearby bench and instantly felt warm and grateful for their presence. 

Holiday seasons in our culture are driven by unrealistic expectations and demands that can bring anxiety, depression and disappointment. 

Neuroscience has taught us that human beings are built with not one but two primary reward systems in our brains. Both are needed for our survival. However, they work in very different ways and seek different rewards. When they work collaboratively, they are terrific. When they work in competition or in isolation and not collaboratively, we can have significant problems.  

One of the reward systems attends to our needs to ACQUIRE things such shelter, partners, and social status as well as "stuff." The other reward system attends to our need to BELONG, to feel safe and loved in our connection with our community. When these reward systems become skewed to acquisition of things rather than to belonging in the warmth of connection and safety with people, we as human beings, are in trouble. Without the Belong system we are adrift in anxiety, unable to explore and share our world with others. The most basic need for emotional survival is to be secure in the sense that we belong, that we are connected to others.  

The holiday season can be particularly difficult for patients and families with mental illness because of the demands in our culture to AQUIRE.  

I am always grateful at this time of year for the families and community members who help in the support and care for people with mental illness throughout the year, day in day out.  I work with the constant reminder of how these partners and communities soothe, suffer, heal and abide with their kin through oftentimes great frustration, with resolve and kindness. 

I am grateful for NAMI Cape Cod and the Islands for their tremendous efforts to unite our community in collaborative efforts to better understand and care for each other's emotional needs. 

There are many helpful suggestions for the holidays in books, magazines, and the internet for how to survive the holidays. My recommendation to all of you for the holidays is to pay much more attention to the needs of the Belong system and to resist the siren's call of the Acquire system. 

In this Holiday season one way to relieve stress is to help out where you belong to lessen the work loads of those who organize the holidays. Find ways you can make the work of the holidays a shared task. Do things together whether cooking meals and baking cookies, singing songs, going to services and/or events with your faith group. Nothing is more rewarding than doing with and for others. Renew old and new relationships. Let others know by your presence that they are part of your world. 

And remember to be especially kind to yourself, to your kin and to all of the people in your world.  I wish you peaceful and happy holidays. 



   Advocacy
     
        NAMI National Advocates for Medicaid Waivers to Pay for Mental Health  In Inpatient Settings

   
11/13/2018

Secretary Alex Azar, U.S. Health & Human Services, announced that the Administration will allow states to apply for Medicaid waivers to pay for mental health treatment in inpatient settings known as IMDs, or institutions of mental disease.  Historically, Medicaid has not paid for treatment in these settings for most adults. While this policy was intended to reduce inhumane institutionalization, it also resulted in unequal coverage of mental health and, tragically, a lack of appropriate options for people with severe mental health conditions.  If we treated other chronic conditions this way, far more people would die from diabetes, epilepsy, hypertension and heart disease.

On September 12 th, NAMI and 11 of our colleagues on the Interdepartmental Serious Mental Illness Coordinating Committee (ISMICC) sent a letter to Administrator Seema Verma of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, calling for Medicaid to cover care provided in inpatient settings, or IMDs and strengthen quality and continuity of care to community services. The ISMICC letter also asked for greater flexibility to pay for evidence-based outpatient services to reduce reliance on hospitalization, such as Coordinated Specialty Care in early psychosis programs and Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) teams. We are so pleased that our recommendations were well received and are being implemented. These changes will make a positive impact on people living with severe mental illness.

"This is a landmark day for people living with severe mental illness and their families," according to Mary Giliberti, NAMI's CEO. "ISMICC played a key role in changing the paradigm from neglect to one of care and compassion for the millions of children, youth and adults of all ages who live with severe mental illness in America. We're grateful that the Administration listened and provided the flexibility and direction for states to improve access to continuity of care for millions of Americans and their families."

NAMI applauds CMS for issuing a detailed letter to State Medicaid Directors that not only allows greater flexibility for inpatient treatment in IMDs, it also takes heartening steps to encourage states to improve outpatient services, including crisis stabilization programs. Today's guidance could provide a shot in the arm to mental health care. NAMI strongly urges states to step up to the plate and use this flexibility from CMS to improve care for people with mental health conditions.


          CCIT Welcomes 30 Police Officers and a Chaplain

NAMI Cape Cod & the Islands and the Taunton CCIT Team are presenting the fourth Community Crisis Intervention Team training Nov 27-29 and Dec 5-6.  This highly successful program seeks to acquaint police officers and other professionals with mental health issues and how best to handle them as well as to introduce them to the resources available on Cape Cod.

This program was sponsored by the Weny Foundation and the late Roger Ludwig.
   
NAMI Education 
 
Family-to-Family is a program for family and friends of people with a mental health challenge.  The course meets weekly for 12 weeks and teaches people about the various mental health conditions, medications commonly used, communication skills, self-care, and problem management.   
We have just completed Family-to-Family in Barnstable, and Falmouth is almost completed.

New session to begin on Wednesday, January 2, 2019  5-7:30 pm in Wellfleet 
 
Homefront is a six-week course similar to Family-to-Family for military families.  This is a pilot program in Massachusetts, and currently will only be available on Cape Cod.  The first offering for Homefront will begin in Barnstable on January 9, 2019 6 - 8:30 p.m.

For more information, or to register for these upcoming courses, call Kim Lemmon at 508-778-4277 or email klemmon@namicapecod.org
 
Daytime NAMI Support Group??
NAMI Cape & Islands has been discussing the idea of starting a new Support Group for the families and friends dealing with a mentally ill loved one to meet in Hyannis in the afternoon.  We recognize that some individuals have difficulty traveling at night, and as the days grow shorter and colder, we think this may be a good time to start a  daytime group. 

 Please reach out and let us know if this is a group you would be interested in attending.  We want to be sure that this group would be attended prior to implementing it.

Email Kim at    klemmon@namicapecod.org  or call the office at 508-778-4277.




  World Diabetes Day 
November 14th, 2018


The Cape Cod YMCA hosted a full day of free workshops on diabetes and related medical and mental conditions. NAMI CC&I participated by sponsoring a one-hour talk and discussion on the depressive effects of diabetes, presented by Cape-wide known Dr. Kenneth Terkelsen of the Community Health Center. 

Dr. Terkelsen made the major and somewhat surprising point that excessive intake of sugar foods containing sugar will often lead to major depression. This impacts an individual's motivation to engage in life and its challenges; people struggle to get out of bed in the morning, they don't care if they are late, the activities that they have enjoyed since childhood become forgotten or too burdensome. These are classic signs of major depression. So, be aware of what and how much sugary substances you consume on a daily basis and add a vigorous and regular regimen of the exercise of your choice to stave off excess weight; and preferably do the exercises with a friend which makes for more fun and improves one's commitment.

Mental Health First Aid

In June NAMI Cape & Islands sponsored a training for some community members to become facilitators of the 8 hour training for Mental Health First Aid.  Since that time, over 80 people have been trained to be a First Aider and potentially help someone having a mental health crisis. 
 
If you as an individual, or a group in an organization, would like more information on how this may benefit you personally or professionally, please call Kim Lemmon, Director of Family Programs, at 508-778-4277.
 
Why Mental Health First Aid?
 
Mental Health First Aid teaches you how to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. This 8-hour training gives you the skills you need to reach out and provide initial support to someone who may be developing a mental health or substance use problem and help connect them to the appropriate care.
 
WHO SHOULD TAKE IT * Employers * Police officers * Hospital staff * First responders * Faith leaders * Community members * Caring individuals




Book Review


Dopesick
Dealers, Doctors, and
The Drug Company That Addicted America
by
Beth Macy

       Beth Macy is a journalist living in Western Virginia and has just written a book on the opioid epidemic and the people and communities affected by it. Over the past several years she has interviewed and followed numerous families and community leaders dealing with this problem. Her book takes a community perspective and asks how did we get here and how can we get out.
She tells the story of Perdue Pharma who started out promoting a morphine derived drug, MSContin, for pain relief for end-of-life patients. When its patent was set to expire, they developed a spin off called OxyContin. It was then marketed to provide chronic and acute pain relief. It was also marketed as having little to no chance of addiction or abuse. Doctors were heavily influenced by their marketing efforts and before long patients were receiving robust prescriptions for pain relief. It would be many years before doctors, pharmaceuticals, and pharmacies came to grips with the errors of their ways.
      
Add to this the economic collapse of many communities in the 1990s and you have what Macy describes as the perfect storm. With the closing of many coal mines and the relocation of a variety of small industries you had a significant rise in what I would call dying communities. Such communities are characterized by high unemployment, increasing disability claims and under-challenged youth and were set up to succumb to the increased availability of opioids. With time it became harder and more expensive to obtain pills. Suddenly heroin became cheaper and more available by the influx of dealers seeking easy money and for many a way to support their own addiction. As heroin became stronger and with the introduction of fentanyl, deaths from overdose skyrocketed and addictions became harder to break.
     
Macy then looks at what can we do now. Still shocking is the significant lack of available treatment. Resources are just not there for many areas of the country. Studies show that Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) combined with counseling, behavioral therapy, and psychosocial support has the best chance for recovery. Yet many courts and programs still insist that people seeking treatment must be drug free.   Macy writes, "The latest research on substance use disorder from Harvard Medical School shows it takes the typical opioid-addicted user eight years- and four to five treatment attempts- to achieve remission for just a single year. And yet only about 10 percent of the addicted population manages to get access to care and treatment for a disease that has roughly the same incidence rate as diabetes." We need a real commitment of resources over an extended period of time to deal with opioid addiction.
     
Macy also writes about the role of drug courts as an alternative to incarceration and the role of harm reduction. Harm reduction is based on the premise that "Users can't get sober if they're dead." Such strategies include needle exchanges, safe injection sites, and community availability of narcan.
     
Macy concludes with the importance of community-wide approaches to this disease. Progress has been made when a community works together to deal with this problem. Coalitions that include local courts, police, churches, social service agencies and health care providers provide the framework for successful intervention. Such coalitions also begin the long-term work of resurrecting depressed communities and thus dealing with one of the key underlying problems.
      
I conclude with a short description of the efforts in Dayton, Ohio to deal with their drug addiction problem. This was just published this week in the New York Times. Under the title "This City's Overdose Deaths Have Plunged. Can Others Learn From It?" reporter Abby Goodnough describes how Dayton Ohio has reduced opioid death by over 50 percent this year compared to 2017. The Dayton community has done many of the things that Macy writes about. First and foremost is a large increase in treatment programs due to increased State and Federal funding and the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. The community itself has formed the Community Overdose Action Team which provides a forum for community leaders and health providers to work together in addressing the needs of the Dayton community. Through this effort they have been able to start a variety of harm reduction programs including access to narcan, needle exchange, and fentanyl testing strips. Finally, the entire community effort has led to a significant increase in community-wide programs to support treatment efforts.

Written by Dr. George Vitek, retired pediatrician who practiced for 28 years in Wilbraham, MA.   Married father of four and grandfather of 9. 

                                                                        
Suzanne Fronzuto
NAMI on Nantucket Program Coordinator
                              
 
Quiet times in Nantucket in November.  The best news is that we received a new grant from the Nantucket Cottage Hospital Community Initiatives for the 
referral service from William James College as well as 
to continue the marketing campaign that brings mental health, mental illness and NAMI Cape Cod & the Islands to the forefront in Nantucket with a multi media presence.
 
NAMI Basics and Family to Family classes will begin in January.  Stay tuned for more specific details.  I will continue to look for ways to boost our Facebook presence as we spread the message- mental health matters; you matter.
   
  NAMI on the Vineyard 




                


 
Lisa Belcastro and Lori Perry spoke at the Tisbury EMS meeting on Tuesday, November 13. The emergency personnel in attendance asked great questions and were receptive and concerned about the needs of people struggling with mental illness and their family members and friends.

NAMI MV has applied for a grant from the Farm Neck Foundation. We're hoping to raise money to have two Vineyarders become certified Mental Health First Aid instructors.

Plans are in the works for a winter joint venture with other mental health organizations on Island. We hope to host three events, one in January, February, and March. We've talked about bowling, movies, and dinners.

The next Family-to-Family program will begin in March.

Please like our  facebook page and follow us as we grow awareness of NAMI on Martha's Vineyard, and offer support to those in need. The more followers (likes) we have, the greater our impact can be.
   

Thank you,
Lisa Belcastro
NAMI - MV Coordinator

   



              From John Snook, 
Executive Director of the Treatment Advocacy Center:
 
John Snook is executive director of the Treatment Advocacy Center, based in Arlington, Virginia. The 20-year-old Center is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminating legal and other barriers to the effective treatment of severe mental illness. The organization promotes laws, policies and practices for the delivery of psychiatric care, and supports treatment and research into the causes of severe and persistent psychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
 
A homeless woman freezes to death on a city sidewalk. A man with delusions is shot dead by police. A teen in psychosis murders his grandmother. These are all preventable tragedies.  

America's mental health treatment system is broken, leaving those most in need to fall through the cracks. An estimated 8.3 million adults in the United States have a severe mental illness. At any given time, 3.9 million go untreated. 
With medication and other support services, those with severe mental illness are no more dangerous than anyone else, capable of leading happy, productive lives. Without treatment, their prospects worsen. 
Yet the odds are stacked against these individuals. Our health care system actively denies them care, and we criminalize the symptoms of their diseases.

When someone has a heart attack, an ambulance takes them to an emergency room. When someone is in the depths of psychosis, however, police are called and frequently cart that person off to jail.

My organization is dedicated to eliminating barriers to treatment for people with severe mental illnesses-to root out systemic impediments to psychiatric care. It is a daunting challenge. 
Families call us every day with heartbreaking stories. Many follow a familiar pattern. A parent notices a young adult child acting differently, growing paranoid and withdrawn. As the illness progresses, the child may hallucinate and become agitated or aggressive. 
Troubled by these symptoms, parents reach out to doctors or crisis services seeking help on behalf of their loved one. However, if their child is too ill to understand the need for treatment, they are rebuffed, told that unless that child himself or herself seeks care, treatment is only available once the child becomes dangerous. 
And so begins a cataclysmic cycle.

Without treatment, those with severe mental illness experience a host of negative consequences. Many take their own lives. Others face a shortened life span due to a much-increased risk for other chronic health conditions. Ultimately, those with severe
mental illness die, on average, 25 years earlier than their peers. 
Others are lost to the streets. Conservative estimates suggest that one quarter of the homeless population suffers from a severe mental illness. In 2017, that amounted to 138,435 individuals on any single night. Also common are arrests for so-called "quality of life" crimes like loitering and public urination-behaviors that are triggered by illness, not criminal intent.

Incarceration has become the norm for those with severe mental illness. But the question remains: Why do we make law enforcement responsible for a public health crisis? 
As a result, incarceration has become the norm for those with severe mental illness. Forty percent of them are incarcerated at some point in their lives. Two million are booked into jails each year. The Treatment Advocacy Center estimates that 383,000 individuals with severe mental illnesses were incarcerated in 2016, although many belonged in hospitals instead. 
But jails are the worst place to provide mental health treatment. Would-be patients are isolated. They deteriorate, are victimized and receive inadequate care. Their symptoms result in additional offenses and time behind bars. A 2018 national investigation revealed that since 2010, more than four hundred people with mental illness have died in our nation's jails.

Others die before ever reaching a cell. According to our report, "Overlooked in the Undercounted," at least one in four fatal law enforcement encounters involve an individual with severe mental illness. They are 16 times more likely to be killed in such an encounter than other civilians. 
Law enforcement is taking steps to train its officers to defuse such situations whenever possible. But those laudable efforts are responsive measures, not preventative ones. 
They do nothing to answer the broader question we ignore: Why do we make law enforcement responsible for a public health crisis?

No matter how one looks at the challenges posed by untreated severe mental illnesses - whether from the perspective of would-be patients, family members, first responders or the general public - the status quo is untenable. 
Yet opportunities to improve the existing mental health system abound.

First, we can and should increase the availability of psychiatric beds, now at a historic low. Even a modest increase would alleviate inhumane bed waits for people in need of inpatient care.

We must also fund a robust continuum of community support services that prevent the severely ill from reaching a crisis state, and reduce the need for a law enforcement response.

And we must make it easier to intervene on behalf of those in need. Family members and other caregivers are also victimized by the destructive symptoms of these chronic illnesses, and should have a right to seek treatment for their afflicted loved ones.

Untreated mental illness need not be an intractable problem. We can either continue to condemn families to predictable, preventable tragedies or we can provide necessary treatment to those who desperately need it. But first we must finally agree as a nation to take the treatment of severe mental illness seriously.  


   
Dance In The Rain 

Dance in the Rain Peer to Peer Mental Health Center
"Where Healing Begins"
 
Dance in the Rain Office: Upstairs at 145 Barnstable Rd. Hyannis.

Drop in for a chat and check us out. No need to attend the programming being offered . Just stop on by and find out more about Dance in the Rain. I bet it's not what you think it is. Peer engagement is one of the foundations of healing.
All meetings, workshops and groups are held at the Dance in the Rain Office Upstairs 145 Barnstable Rd. Hyannis. Unless otherwise noted.
Pick a day to come every week and become part of something really unique and healing.in the Rain is looking for donations of art materials for our open art studio.  Canvases, acrylic paints, brushes, drawing paper, frames, and collage materials.
 
Dance in the Rain Peer to Peer Mental Health Center is open Monday through Thursday 10:00AM to 4:00PM. "Dance..." offers a variety of daily workshops and meetings.  We are drop-in style and all of our services are free of charge.  Come check us out and experience the healing power of peer engagement.
 
Please visit our website at: www.danceintherain-wpa.org

For more information, contact:
Mary E. Munsell
Founder/Executive Director/Peer
Dance in the Rain Whole Person Approach
Peer to Peer Mental Health Center
501 c 3 Non Profit Public Charity
508-364-4045




              From John Snook, 
Executive Director of the                                           Treatment Advocacy Center:
 
John Snook is executive director of the Treatment Advocacy Center, based in Arlington, Virginia. The 20-year-old Center is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to eliminating legal and other barriers to the effective treatment of severe mental illness. The organization promotes laws, policies and practices for the delivery of psychiatric care, and supports treatment and research into the causes of severe and persistent psychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.
 
A homeless woman freezes to death on a city sidewalk. A man with delusions is shot dead by police. A teen in psychosis murders his grandmother. These are all preventable tragedies.  

America's mental health treatment system is broken, leaving those most in need to fall through the cracks. An estimated 8.3 million adults in the United States have a severe mental illness. At any given time, 3.9 million go untreated. 
With medication and other support services, those with severe mental illness are no more dangerous than anyone else, capable of leading happy, productive lives. Without treatment, their prospects worsen. 
Yet the odds are stacked against these individuals. Our health care system actively denies them care, and we criminalize the symptoms of their diseases.

When someone has a heart attack, an ambulance takes them to an emergency room. When someone is in the depths of psychosis, however, police are called and frequently cart that person off to jail.

My organization is dedicated to eliminating barriers to treatment for people with severe mental illnesses-to root out systemic impediments to psychiatric care. It is a daunting challenge. 
Families call us every day with heartbreaking stories. Many follow a familiar pattern. A parent notices a young adult child acting differently, growing paranoid and withdrawn. As the illness progresses, the child may hallucinate and become agitated or aggressive. 
Troubled by these symptoms, parents reach out to doctors or crisis services seeking help on behalf of their loved one. However, if their child is too ill to understand the need for treatment, they are rebuffed, told that unless that child himself or herself seeks care, treatment is only available once the child becomes dangerous. 
And so begins a cataclysmic cycle.

Without treatment, those with severe mental illness experience a host of negative consequences. Many take their own lives. Others face a shortened life span due to a much-increased risk for other chronic health conditions. Ultimately, those with severe
mental illness die, on average, 25 years earlier than their peers. 
Others are lost to the streets. Conservative estimates suggest that one quarter of the homeless population suffers from a severe mental illness. In 2017, that amounted to 138,435 individuals on any single night. Also common are arrests for so-called "quality of life" crimes like loitering and public urination-behaviors that are triggered by illness, not criminal intent.

Incarceration has become the norm for those with severe mental illness. But the question remains: Why do we make law enforcement responsible for a public health crisis? 
As a result, incarceration has become the norm for those with severe mental illness. Forty percent of them are incarcerated at some point in their lives. Two million are booked into jails each year. The Treatment Advocacy Center estimates that 383,000 individuals with severe mental illnesses were incarcerated in 2016, although many belonged in hospitals instead. 
But jails are the worst place to provide mental health treatment. Would-be patients are isolated. They deteriorate, are victimized and receive inadequate care. Their symptoms result in additional offenses and time behind bars. A 2018 national investigation revealed that since 2010, more than four hundred people with mental illness have died in our nation's jails.

Others die before ever reaching a cell. According to our report, "Overlooked in the Undercounted," at least one in four fatal law enforcement encounters involve an individual with severe mental illness. They are 16 times more likely to be killed in such an encounter than other civilians. 
Law enforcement is taking steps to train its officers to defuse such situations whenever possible. But those laudable efforts are responsive measures, not preventative ones. 
They do nothing to answer the broader question we ignore: Why do we make law enforcement responsible for a public health crisis?

No matter how one looks at the challenges posed by untreated severe mental illnesses - whether from the perspective of would-be patients, family members, first responders or the general public - the status quo is untenable. 
Yet opportunities to improve the existing mental health system abound.

First, we can and should increase the availability of psychiatric beds, now at a historic low. Even a modest increase would alleviate inhumane bed waits for people in need of inpatient care.

We must also fund a robust continuum of community support services that prevent the severely ill from reaching a crisis state, and reduce the need for a law enforcement response.

And we must make it easier to intervene on behalf of those in need. Family members and other caregivers are also victimized by the destructive symptoms of these chronic illnesses, and should have a right to seek treatment for their afflicted loved ones.

Untreated mental illness need not be an intractable problem. We can either continue to condemn families to predictable, preventable tragedies or we can provide necessary treatment to those who desperately need it. But first we must finally agree as a nation to take the treatment of severe mental illness seriously.  


   
The Primer on Mental Health
WE'RE PUBLISHED!! You Are Not Alone: A Primer on Mental Illness, which has been in development for the past 18 months, is about to be reprinted. (Call or email the office to make arrangements for your personal copy or copies for your organization.)   The Primer is also online on our NAMI CC&I web site. 

The production and publication of this 88-page booklet was made possible by generous support from the Cape Cod Healthcare Community Benefits Fund, The Kelley Foundation, Inc. and The Cape Cod Five Foundation.

h
Tidbits...

Outer Cape Health Services Cuts Ribbon on New Harwich Port Center
 
Outer Cape Health Services celebrated the completion of its new Harwich Port facility with a ribbon cutting ceremony. The non-profit organization which provides a full range of health care and supportive social services will open the renovated former Thompson's Market on Main Street on Monday, December 3. The nearly 30,000-square-foot, two-story building will include 18 patient exam rooms, a pharmacy, lab services, ambulatory transfer area, community conference room and the organization's administrative offices.
 
The new facility has tripled capacity for Lower Cape patients. The new center will also serve Outer Cape residents as Wellfleet center patients will be split up between the Harwich Port and Provincetown locations. The Wellfleet center just closed for renovations as part of the organization's continued expansion.
                
             ********************************************************  

Did You Know
      Walmart is testing out the idea of offering mental health services in some of its stores with the idea of reducing the stigma of receiving these services.  Unfortunately, none of the test sites are on or near Cape Cod, but stay tuned to see how this project works.
                                                                                                           
GRANDPARENTS RAISING GRANDCHILDREN
                              
Support Group
Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Our Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Support Group with Kerry Bickford meets on the third Wednesday of the month. This group provides a supportive environment for all grandparents who play a significant role in raising their grandchild(ren). Dinner and child care provided. Registration required. Information or registration: 508-815-5100 or jsullivan@familycontinuity.org.

Grandparents Raising Grandchildren:  Legal Advice
Grandparents with questions about guardianship/options can visit the Probate Court on the 3rd Thursday  of the month between 8:30 AM-1:00 PM.
They can also call the Bar Association (508-362-2121) or Susan at the courthouse (508-375-6730) for an appointment with Kathleen Snow on  Mondays between 10:00 AM-1:00 PM.
There is no fee for either of these consultations.

 
Lawyer For A Day--Free Legal Advice
Held daily at the Barnstable Probate Court.  It is advisable to arrive promptly when it opens at 9:00 am as it is first come, first served and fills up quickly.
 
 
I nclusions in the Newsletter
We have recently been asked for last minute inclusions of events in our newsletter.  We have instituted a new policy:  It is at the discretion of the Executive Director to determine whether content being submitted for distribution to the membership is aligned with our mission.  If the content is determined to be appropriate, it may be included in the monthly e-newsletter if it is submitted prior to the first of the month.

 
 

 
When  shopping on Amazon, think NAMI CC&I and Amazon Smile.
 Every dollar you give to NAMI CC&I goes to help support, educate and advocate for the residents of Cape Cod, Nantucket and Martha's Vineyard.  



AmazonSmile is a simple way to give when you are shopping on Amazon

Amazon donates 0.5% of your eligible purchases. 
It's so easy, you can still use your Amazon Prime and you still collect points.  All you need to do is:  When you are going to make a purchase on Amazon, first enter
in your internet browser. On your first visit to AmazonSmile, you will be prompted to select a charitable organization .  
Select NAMI Cape Cod Inc.
Thank You!