ocmast

November 2013 

Silver Circle 2013
Special
Off Camera Edition
2013 Gold & Silver Circle 
Induction Luncheon Event Coverage
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In "Off Camera" This Month:
Editor's Note
Gold & Silver Circle 2013: A Day To Remember
Gold & Silver Circle 2013: Pictorial
Purchase Official 2013 Gold & Silver Circle Photographs!
Gold & Silver Circle 2013: Bay Area Students Receive NATAS Scholarships
Gold & Silver Circle Profiles: William Winter
Reno's KOLO Celebrates 60 Years In Grand Style
Off Camera EXCLUSIVE: FBI Agent, His Cameraman Son and Patty Hearst
Soundbites: KGO-TV ABC7's Cheryl Jennings
Fresno Becoming More Involved In Chapter
The Health Reporter
Evox Television Focuses On Healthy Lifestyles
BABJA Scholarship Luncheon Nov. 8
James Beard Foundation Awards Call For Entries
Former KTVU Editor Tim Ayres Dies
TV A Go Go
Do You Remember When?
KITV Sponsors Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Mobile TV Webcast Nov. 13
DirecTV, Time Warner, Charter Seek Free Broadcast TV Signals

Off Camera

    Kevin Wing, Editor 

the board of governors

 

officers:

Keith Sanders, San Jos State University, President

Kevin Wing, ABC-TV/"Good Morning America," VP San Francisco

Christian Anguiano, KUVS 19, VP Sacramento

Richard Harmelink, KFSN ABC 30, VP Fresno

Justin Fujioka, KITV 4, VP Hawaii

Terri Russell, KOLO 8, VP Reno

Mike Garza, KXTV 10, VP Smaller Markets

Kym McNicholas, PandoDaily, Secretary (Memership) 

Terry Lowry, LaCosse Productions, Treasurer

Javier Valencia, Consultant, Past President

 

national trustees:

Linda Giannecchini, KQED

(National Awards Co-Chair)

(Museum)

Alison Gibson, Media Cool

(National 2nd Vice Chairperson)

Cynthia Zeiden, Zeiden Media

(National Program Chair)

(Activities)

Steve Shlisky, KTVU 2  (Alternate) (Education)

 

 governors:

Zara Arboleda, KGPE CBS 47

Kent Beichley, Freelance

Luis Godinez, KDTV Univision 14

Pablo Icub, KUVS Univision 19

Mistie Lackey, KOVR CBS 13

George Lang, The Big Picture

Da Lin, KPIX 5

Jen Mistrot, KPIX 5

Karen Owoc, The Health Reporter

Jim Parker, CBS Digital Media

Jack Pavelick, Springboard TV

Greg Rando, KTVU Channel 2

Bob Redell, KNTV NBC Bay Area

Gary Schultz, KGO ABC 7

Sandy Sirias, KFTV Univision 21

Matt Skryja, AAA 

Kim Stephens, KMPH Fox 26

Stephanie Stone, KFSN ABC 30

Karen Sutton, Stanford Video

Ken Wayne, KTVU Channel 2

David Waxman, KRCB 22

Justin Willis, KSEE 24

Pamela Young, KITV 4

Alice Yu, KVIE 6

 

committee chairs:

John Catchings, Catchings & Associates (Museum)

Craig Franklin, (Awards)

Mark Pearson, ARC Law Group (Legal/Bylaws)

James Spalding, Spalding & Co. (Finance)

Patty Zubov, Platonic TV

(Marketing)

 

execUtive director:

Darryl R. Compton, NATAS 

Quick Links
Silver Circle
Inductees And Presenters

SC presenters 1
Silver Circle 
Inductees And Presenters

SC presenters 2
Gold Circle
Inductee And Presenter
   Davis Covington


 

 


 


 


 
Editor's Note

Dear
Off Camera Readers, 
      I hope you enjoy this latest issue of
Off Camera. During the last several months, our Board of Governors and Event Committees of the San Francisco/Northern California Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences have been extremely proud to present our two biggest events of the year: the 2013 Emmy Awards Gala, held in June in San Francisco, and the 2013 Gold & Silver Circle Induction Luncheon on Oct. 19, also held in San Francisco. 
     If you were there, you already know what a great afternoon you had. If you didn't have an opportunity to be there, we hope you'll enjoy reading all about it this month in a story written by Chapter President Keith Sanders. It was a wonderful celebration, and as many have said through the years, this event is much like a reunion: seeing old friends, and making new ones. This month, you're going to see how much fun the day was in the many photographs we showcase. Have a look. You just might see yourself!
     Putting on an event like the Gold & Silver Circle Induction Luncheon not only takes spirited teamwork from the Gold & Silver Circle Committee led by Terry Lowry, but it takes 
commitment from dedicated sponsors. As you thumb through below, you'll see several ads representing them. Please show your support of them. And, remember that there are more articles and photos below the ads. 
     Thanks so much for checking out your Off Camera. I hope you enjoy this issue.
     Kevin Wing
Editor, Off Camera
GOLD & SILVER CIRCLE 2013
Davis' 50-Year Career
Honored With Induction
Into Gold Circle
Christian, Ford, Gonzales, 
Silva, Swanson, Wing 
Enshrined
In Silver Circle 

By Keith Sanders
Chapter President

Once a year, they can be seen. 

Just one time. 

Just one place. 

Who are they? They are among the finest broadcasters and media professionals from the Bay Area, northern California, Hawaii and Reno. This year they came to honor seven individuals who have made significant contributions to television in our Chapter at the 2013 NATAS Gold & Silver Circle Induction Luncheon. This warm and festive event took place Saturday, Oct. 19 at the Parc 55 Wyndham Hotel, San Francisco-Union Square.

"The Inductees and their friends, family, colleagues and co-workers come together with pride to remember the past, renew relationships, catch up on the latest gossip and celebrate their induction," says Terry LowryGold & Silver Circle Committee Chair and show producer

The audience was transported down memory lane with a short video about each inductee, shown just before their acceptance speech.

"It never fails. I get choked up every year at Gold & Silver. This year was no exception. Watching these amazing journalists celebrate their amazing careers is both humbling and inspiring," says Emmy Event Committee Chair Julie Watts.

The Silver Circle honors individuals who have made a significant contribution to San Francisco/Northern California television for a major part of their 25-year-plus careers. The Gold Circle honors those who have made a significant contribution to San Francisco/Northern California television for a major part of their 50-year-plus careers.

Chapter President Keith Sanders welcomed the audience to the luncheon. Rita Williams, who retired from KTVU in Oakland after a nearly 40-year career in television news, served as the mistress of ceremonies. 

"Rita was in that first wave of women journalists on TV in the early 70's. A trailblazer for women in television," Lowry says. 

Emmy� Award-winning reporter and Bay Area native Juliette Goodrich spoke about the first Silver Circle inductee, Roberta Gonzales, who is currently KPIX 5's weekend weather anchor and handles additional reporting responsibilities during the week. But, Goodrich left the actual introduction to Randall Hahn, Gonzales' oldest son, who is a junior in college, majoring in sports media/marketing. He did a great job and got a big hug from mom when she accepted the honor.

Williams then introduced the legendary Fred Zehnder (Silver Circle Class of 1991) the respected, longtime news director of The Original 10 o'Clock News at KTVU Channel 2. After 21 years there, he retired as news director in 1999 and moved on to own a publishing company, East Bay Publishing Corporation, which publishes weekly newspapers in San Leandro and Castro Valley. Zehnder introduced the second Silver Circle inductee of the night, Bay Area native and two-time Emmy� Award recipient Kevin Wing, who Zehnder hired twice at KTVU, first in 1987, then again in 1990 with the debut of Mornings On 2. Wing is a versatile journalist who has done it all, having worked as an assignment editor, reporter and producer at numerous Bay Area and northern California stations besides KTVU, including KGO-TV, KNTV, KRON, KICU, KFTY and KIEM. He also briefly worked at KFMB-TV in San Diego. Since 2006, Wing has been a Bay Area-based field producer for ABC News' Good Morning America and World News, and is very active on the NATAS/SF-NorCal Board of Governors, where he serves as San Francisco vice president and editor of Off Camera.

Presenter Vicki Liviakis joined KRON 4 in 2001 and currently works as an anchor and general assignment reporter there. Liviakis told the audience about Jim Swanson, the next Silver Circle inductee. He's the recipient of 15 Emmy� Awards, and works as director of local programming at KRON. Swanson began there in 1977, producing religious shows. In 1983, he began producing documentaries, children's shows and live sporting events for KPIX. In 1996, Swanson returned to KRON to run their local programming department and produce shows like Bay Area Backroads.

Williams announced that the next Silver Circle inductee is Lori Silva, news director at KHON 2 in Honolulu. She added that her presenter is Kristina Lockwood, president and general manager of KHON.          "Unfortunately, Kristina and Lori are not able to join us from Hawaii in person, but we do have them on tape," Williams explained. She followed up by saying, "I'm offering to deliver the pin and plaque to Lori. Terry, will the Academy pick-up the tab?" This quip got a big laugh from the audience.

Williams called the next presenter, Mike Sugerman, "one of the best storytellers in the U.S." He has received eight individual national Edward R. Murrow Awards, 14 Emmy� Awards and more than 100 other national, state, regional, and local awards. Sugerman then introduced Silver Circle inductee Don Ford, who started his 30-year career at KZTV in Corpus Christi, Texas as a "one man band" reporter and photographer. He moved on to KOVR and KXTV in Sacramento before joining KRON. Ford joined KPIX 5 as a multi-media journalist in 2011. The adventure-seeker is a distinguished photographer who shoots, writes, and edits all of his own stories and has the awards to prove it.

Presenter Dan Ashley is KGO-TV's weekday evening anchor of ABC7 News at 6 and 11 p.m. and ABC7 News at 9 p.m. on KOFY. He arrived at KGO-TV in 1995 and has received a number of awards, including the prestigious DuPont Columbia Award, and the Edward R. Murrow Award. Ashley introduced Silver Circle inductee Spencer Christian, who has spent more than 42 years in TV news as a news reporter, sportscaster, talk show host and weather forecaster. His career began in 1971 as a news reporter at the NBC affiliate in Richmond, Virginia. But, he quickly moved to weather. By the mid-1970s, Christian was on his way to WABC-TV in New York for nine years. In 1986, he joined ABC's Good Morning America, where he remained 13 years. In 1999, California called and KGO-TV and the Bay Area became his home.

Williams introduced Francee Covington, who became a friend and fan of Belva Davis in the late 1970s when she was a producer on Davis' popular multicultural show All Together Now at KPIX-TV.  For more than 20 years, Covington was the creative force behind her San Francisco video production company.  She introduced Gold Circle inductee Davis, the Bay Area television journalist and broadcaster who earlier this year retired after a half-century in the business. Davis' career began in 1963 at KTVU in Oakland. She eventually went on to KPIX and KRON, both in San Francisco, where she worked as a news anchor, reporter and urban affairs specialist. For nearly 20 years, until last year, Davis was with KQED, serving as the host/moderator of This Week in Northern California. Davis was inducted into the Silver Circle in 1989.

Education Committee Chair Steve Shlisky awarded $10,000 in scholarships. Each scholarship winner was introduced, and clips from their winning entries were screened. "I love the juxtaposition of the old and new. Old-timers getting their due recognition while a new generation receives their first professional honors," Shlisky says.

Laney College student Vincent Huergas received the $2,000 Shelly Fay Videography scholarship. Stanford University student Katherine Gorringe received the $2,000 Miss Nancy Besst Graduate Scholarship.

For the third year in a row, Emmy� Award-winning Cinematographer/Director George Lang has donated $6,000 for scholarships memorializing two of his KGO-TV colleagues, the late Jerry Jensen and the late Steve Davis. San Francisco State University student Talia Samellian received the $3,000 Steve Davis Undergraduate Overall Excellence Scholarship. Stanford University student Lauren DeFilipo received the $3,000 Jerry Jensen Graduate Overall Excellence Scholarship.

        Each year, six to eight distinguished broadcasters, representing those from Northern California, Reno and Hawaii, become members of the prestigious Gold & Silver Circle organization.                      "Including today's inductees, there are 235 members of the Gold & Silver Circle combined. 161 members are still living," Lowry says. 

       Lowry also took a moment to remember the Gold & Silver Circle members who have passed on since last year's induction luncheon. Two members had passed before last year's luncheon that the committee was unaware of it at the time.

Art Director Nick Hamel was one of the founding members of our chapter and Silver Circle Class of '88. He worked at KGO from 1954 to 1972, spent a couple of years in Los Angeles, then moved to KTVU as design director from 1979 to 1988. Hamel died in June 2012.  

KQED General Manager Anthony Tiano, Silver Circle Class of 1991, served at KQED from 1979 to 1993, including the move to the Mariposa Street location. He eventually moved to New Mexico and started Santa Fe Productions, producing PBS programs. Tiano died in August 2012. 

The "Lady of 1,000 Voices", the original Crusader Rabbit, "Anastasia" in Cinderella and "Smurfette" on TV, Lucille Bliss was the name behind the screen. She was inducted into the Silver Circle in 1989 and the Gold Circle in 2002. She hosted the children's show, Happy Birthday, on KGO, for five years.  Bliss worked almost to the end of her 96 years, doing voiceovers and voice coaching. She died in November 2012. 

Twenty-five year veteran reporter of KPIX, Ben Williams died in December 2012. He was a member of the Silver Circle Class of 2000, and the first black television news reporter in the Bay Area. He covered everything from the assassination of Sen. Robert Kennedy to the kidnapping of newspaper heiress Patty Hearst.  Williams was also active in the Broadcast Legends.

Lowry also acknowledged our special donors, Gold Table sponsor KRON, Silver Table sponsor KGO-TV, Silver Table sponsor KPIX, and In-Kind Sponsors, Watts Winery in Lodi, See's Candies, Goodie Bag Donors and Floradora Floral Designs, who provided the fabulous flower arrangement on each table.

Special thanks to the Gold & Silver Circle committee members who made this show possible: Terry Lowry, chair; Craig Franklin, Cynthia ZeidenLynn FriedmanDiane Paskerian, Javier Valencia, John Catchings, Linda Giannecchini, Ron Louie, Sharon Navratil, Julie Watts, Karen Sutton, Kevin Wing, Kym McNicholas, Patty Zubov, Richard Harmelink, Steve Shlisky and Sultan Mirza.

Special thanks, also, to the Education Committee members who made the scholarships possible: Steve Shlisky, chair; Alison Gibson, John Odell, gayle yamada, Terri Russell, David Waxman, Phil Kipper, Kim Stephens and George Lang.

 


Photo Credits: Ken Newberry And Fazil Erdem

GOLD & SILVER CIRCLE 2013
Inductees Celebrate 65 Years Of TV History

Official Gold & Silver Circle Photography 
By Ken Newberry and Fazil Erdem

 

 

 
 
 


Official 2013 Gold & Silver Circle Photographs!

Bring Home The Memories!
 
Photos By Ken Newberry and Fazil Erdem 
 




 



 
GOLD & SILVER CIRCLE 2013
Investing In The Industry's Future
Four Bay Area Students Receive NATAS Scholarships
   
Future Journalists And Broadcasters Honored
George Lang, left, of The Big Picture Film & Video Arts and a Chapter Governor, and Steve Shlisky, the Chapter's Education Committee chairperson, fourth from left, stand with this year's scholarship recipients. From left to right: Vincent Huergas, of Laney College; Katherine Gorringe, of Stanford University; Talia Samelian, of San Francisco State University; and Lauren DeFilipo, of Stanford University. 
Photo Credits: Ken Newberry and Fazil Erdem

By Steve Shlisky
Chairperson, Chapter Education Committee
 
         Four outstanding local media students have completed their own chapter of professional recognition.

         Scholarships sponsored by the San Francisco/Northern California Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences were awarded at the Gold & Silver Circle Induction Luncheon in San Francisco Oct. 19. 

         Before the induction of our local Chapter's 25- and 50- year television industry veterans into the Gold & Silver Circle, a brief ceremony recognized excellence in college video work. After some introductory comments, short clips of each student's work were shown. Part of the recognition was the presentation of a check and certificate to each student.

        This year's $2,000 scholarships went to Vincent Huergas, from Laney College of Oakland, recipient of the Shelly Fay Videography Scholarship; and Katherine Gorringe, from Stanford University, was the recipient of The "Miss Nancy" Besst Graduate Scholarship.

        For the third year, the Chapter awarded two scholarships generously funded by George Lang, president of The Big Picture Film & Video Arts and a newly-elected Chapter Governor. These two $3,000 scholarships are in remembrance of two KGO-TV journalists: Jerry Jensen, who co-anchored the station's News Scene broadcasts for 15 years before his death in 1984; and Steve Davis, an anchor and reporter at the station from 1971 to 1993. Davis died in 2005. 

       The Steve Davis Undergraduate Overall Excellence Scholarship was awarded to Talia Samelian, from San Francisco State University, and The Jerry Jensen Graduate Overall Excellence Scholarship went to Lauren DeFilipo, from Stanford University

       All four expressed appreciation for the recognition moments after receiving the award.

       "I am very grateful to the professional judges who viewed my work. Hard work seems to be paying off in all sorts of ways. It makes things seem real and relevant," says Huegas. 

       "It is rewarding for my first pieces to be recognized," Samelian says. I have never seen my work projected on a big screen before. This has been very special."

      As for the awards, both Stanford graduate students are thankful for the cash awards because they are each self-funding their master's thesis projects.

      "I like to tell meaningful human stories," says Gorringe. "Local television is a new frontier for indie filmmakers."

     DeFilipo is already planning her MFA thesis film.

     "I love the short form format and will be finishing my degree soon," she says.

      For Samelian, a senior undergraduate, the award will help to offset her San Francisco State tuition. She works part-time at the KPIX 5 assignment desk while completing her degree. 

      "I have dedicated myself to pursuing a career as a news reporter, and the city of San Francisco has provided me with the perfect stage in which to do this," she adds. 

      Huergas started his college studies at California State University, East Bay, took a couple of media classes from Laney College and is now enrolled in San Francisco State University's broadcast electronic and communication arts department. Huergas now teaches at the East Bay Asian Art Center, the very same program where he learned video production.      

      "While I believe he can be successful in any field he dedicates himself to, it has become quite clear that video production and broadcast media is where his passion and motivation lay," says Peter Kim, the center's program director. 

      Gorringe already has two college degrees (one each in music and history) from Northwestern University. She started her media career making a short documentary about a neighborhood installing sidewalk tiles to remember family members who disappeared during Argentina's bloody dictatorship in the 1970s.

      "The experience of telling a profound of these brave and unique people united my competing interests and inspired me to pursue a new life goal of creating documentaries," she says.

     DeFilipo has worked as an assistant editor and associate producer for Insignia Films, content generally distributed to PBS. 

     "For me, the most successful documentary work on television tells a fascinating story with compelling characters," DeFilippo says. Jan Krawitz, director of Stanford's MFA program, says DeFilipo's three films "are the result of diligent pre-production and a clarity of vision for the documentary she plans to create."

     The panel could have awarded seven scholarships this year. Keeping with the high standards set by our local Chapter, the Scholarship Committee decided to only award those individual entries that rose to the highest professional level. The $2,000 Peter Marino Production Scholarship, the $2,000 Rigo Chacon Reporting Scholarship, and the $2,000 Kenneth Sloat Langley Writing Scholarship had no recipients.

     For more information, go to: http://emmysf.tv/silver-circle.html

 

Gold & Silver Circle Profiles 

 

 

GSC Profile Header_new  

        

       He was a veteran radio and television commentator and the first "Voice of America" who eventually became an expert on international affairs. Later, during the early years of Bay Area television, he became known as San Francisco's "first anchorman" after he began appearing on KGO-TV and KPIX in San Francisco.

          His name was William Winter. He was not only a broadcasting big shot in the Bay Area, but he was known throughout the country and around the world. Winter had spent decades as a war correspondent and network news analyst, long before Bay Area viewers started to watch him on the evening news throughout the 1950s.

          Winter, who died in November 1999, was inducted into the Silver Circle of the San Francisco/Northern California Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences in 1990.

          Born in Newark, New Jersey, the Bay Area was a faraway place for Winter at that time. He grew up in North Carolina and studied law privately while working in a law office. Several months before he turned 21, Winter passed the state bar exam, becoming the youngest attorney in the United States at that time.

          He worked as a trial lawyer for an insurance company in New York, then returned to North Carolina, where one of his clients was a radio network. Because of his grasp of international law and current events, he was asked to become a radio news analyst. In 1935, he gave up law and took on the radio airwaves.

          In 1941, CBS Radio transferred Winter to San Francisco, where he would offer a daily network news analysis, focusing on the United States' international relations. After the director of the Malaya Broadcasting Corporation of Singapore asked to relay Winter's commentaries throughout Asia via shortwave radio, the United States decided in September of that year - only months before the bombing of Pearl Harbor brought the United States into World War II - to make Winter its first State Department-sponsored "Voice of America".

          In Winter's daily broadcasts, he assured Asians that the United States, although not in the war at that time, was concerned about protecting Asians. Winter also offered even-handed explanations of democracy and freedom of expression, supporting his comments with quotations from American interventionists and isolationists alike.

          During the final two years of World War II, when Winter would accompany Gen. Douglas MacArthur, Winter became so reviled by Japan's Radio Tokyo that it aired a play featuring three men barred from Heaven because of their wickedness - President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill, and Winter.

          Winter, in 1945, covered the United Nations Charter Conference in San Francisco for the State Department. He then covered the Korean War for the United Nations.

          Winter anchored KGO-TV's news in the 1950s, then went to work for KPIX, where he anchored William Winter & The News, from 1955 to 1960.

          In 1955, Winter was also a television news analyst for ABC.

          In his later years, Winter became a sought-after speaker on international affairs at university campuses and conferences around the world. He also taught extension courses at the University of California, Los Angeles.

          He also organized the William Winter Study Tours, leading various groups to far-flung venues from Africa and the Soviet Union to India and the Philippines.

          Winter and his wife, Peggy, eventually relocated to southern California.  

          Winter died Nov. 3, 1999, in Woodland Hills, leaving behind a legacy that remains here in the Bay Area.

 

 

Reno's First TV Station Celebrates Six Decades
Original Staffers, Dignitaries Among 250 At Birthday Bash

By Terri Russell

Vice President, Reno

 

       KOLO, Reno's first television station, celebrated its 60th anniversary at its Ampere Drive studios Oct. 11, with 250 guests and community leaders attending an open house to mark the occasion.

Rich History 
KOLO's "Zomboo" greets two of the station's original employees: Tom Hughes, top right, and Durward Wasmer

      Those guests were greeted at the front door and encouraged to tour the station and sample a menu that reflected various decades in which KOLO has been on the air.

      The exact 60th anniversary was on Sept. 27. The station signed on in 1953 as KZTV, the first northern Nevada television station to hit the airwaves. 

      However, because September was a busy month with community events like the Reno Championship Air Races and Street Vibrations,  News Director Jennifer Hardy wanted to accommodate as many people as possible.

      "We wanted to make sure as many of our friends could attend the birthday party," Hardy says. "We pushed the date to mid-October."

Hardy says a small group of employees from sales, news and production helped plan the

The Legacy Continues
Bob Carroll, left, KOLO's first news director, reminisces with anchor
Pat Hambright.

festivities.

      Dignitaries and some of KZTV's first employees attended to help the station and staff

celebrate KOLO's rich tradition in Nevada's broadcast industry.

      Station events will continue until the end of the year,including a station entry in the Nevada Day Parade; and the largest statehood celebration in the country.

      Veteran KOLO reporter Ed Pearce will continue his "Throwback Thursdays" series, looking at the history of KOLO and its influence in northern Nevada.

      During the November sweeps period, viewers will get a chance to win a diamond ring every week in recognition of the station's diamond anniversary.


Off Camera EXCLUSIVE
Classified Information? Not Anymore
How FBI Gave Big Scoop To One Bay Area TV Newsroom
The Day Patty Hearst Was Arrested In S.F. In 1975

 

By Kevin Wing

Vice President, San Francisco

 

      A son who worked in television news. A father who worked for the FBI. And Patty Hearst.

      It could be said that it has been classified information all of these years. Nearly four decades, to be exact.

      Or, perhaps, it was information that needed to be considered top secret for a reason.

After all, the Federal Bureau of Investigation was involved, and the information came from the No. 2 man in the FBI's San Francisco office.

      But now, it can be revealed how information from the FBI's No. 2 man in San Francisco reached Oakland television station KTVU back in September of 1975.

      The Bay Area was a different place back then. The region had survived the political and societal turbulence of the 1960s, from the protests at Berkeley to the "free love" ways of the Haight Ashbury, only to enter a period of anti-establishment upheaval in the 1970s. The Vietnam conflict finally came to a close by the middle part of the decade. Here in the Bay Area, in 1973, Oakland schools superintendent Marcus A. Foster had been assassinated by members of the Symbionese Liberation Army. He was the first African-American superintendent of the Oakland Unified School District.

     What happened in September of 1975 that was so classified until now?

It was the day newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst was captured in San Francisco and arrested. She had become a member of the Symbionese Liberation Army, the left-wing urban guerrilla group which abducted her from her Berkeley apartment 19 months earlier, on Feb. 4, 1974. Hearst, the granddaughter of publishing magnate William Randolph Hearst, gained notoriety after her kidnapping, and her eventual recruitment into the SLA.

     In September of 1975, Hearst was arrested by the FBI and San Francisco Police in a San Francisco apartment. At that time, speculation about Hearst's whereabouts since her kidnapping kept her name in the headlines and at the top of local newscasts during that era.

     How KTVU got the scoop about Hearst's arrest had everything to do with Daniel Grayson MacDonald, the FBI's No. 2 man in its San Francisco bureau. MacDonald was the beloved stepfather of longtime Bay Area television photographer, George Lang. Lang, his career just a few years out of the starting gate at that point, had been a freelance cameraman for KTVU as well as for KPIX. That day, Lang was working at KTVU.

    "I covered everything that was going on with the SLA," says Lang, who, after more than 25 years as a veteran TV cameraman primarily for KGO-TV, started his own Marin County-based production company, The Big Picture Film and Video Arts. "As a freelancer and stringer at the time, I would go out and cover all the remnants of what was happening with the SLA and Patty Hearst at that time.

    "I was working at Channel 2 the day Bill and Emily Harris were arrested," Lang says. The Harrises were also SLA members. "They were captured in San Francisco. In the newsroom, we were all scurrying around, trying to make sense of what happened."

    Lang says it was around 2:30 p.m. when the phone rang in the newsroom. The call was for him, and it was urgent. His stepfather was calling him.

    "When I got on the phone, he was excited, almost giddy in a childish kind of way," Lang recalls. "He wasn't a bubbly guy, but he was really excited. My dad always called me "Scoops"."

    "So, my dad says, 'They got Patty. I'm looking at her. I know I've never been able to give you any scoops before, but now, I'm giving you a scoop!"

    Lang looked around the newsroom, but couldn't find anyone to tell right away. Then, in walks Fred Zehnder, who was assignment editor in the newsroom at that time.

    "There was my loyalty," Lang says. "He's the first one who hired me. I stood up and said, 'They've got Patty!'"

    Zehnder, who was aware that Lang's stepfather was with the FBI, asked him for the source of the information. Lang simply had to say, "you know", to convince Zehnder to break the story to the Bay Area. Soon, anchor Claud Mann went into the studio to break into regular programming with the announcement.

    By then, Lang was dispatched to head to the Federal Building in San Francisco to get a shot of Hearst.

    Ironically, Lang drove into San Francisco behind the wheel of a KPIX camera car. He'd worked for Channel 5 the day before, but still had their car when he went to work that day at Channel 2.

    Lang arrived at the Federal Building, parked the car on the Turk Street side, then with camera and gear in hand, ran down to the basement of the building where the garage was. He was going to look for a place to hide until Hearst was whisked in via a patrol car.

    "There was no place to hide," Lang says. "Then, I saw a green door with a long handle on it. I opened it, and went inside. There was a gangway, and by leaving the green door partially opened, I could see right across the garage where the cars would come in. I was hiding for 20 minutes. During that time, I thought about a lot of things, even thinking how a shot of Patty would make my career."

    Suddenly, Lang heard a loud, whirring sound. He realized he was hiding in a maintenance utility room. A large draft came through and basically slammed the green door shut. Lang tried to push the door, but the suction from the strong draft was keeping it shut.

    "Finally, I heard the sound of cars coming into the garage," Lang says. "I managed to fling the door open. And then I went down. My cheek is on the ground. The marshals had me on the ground. I saw Patty being taken in. This was supposed to be the shot of my lifetime. I watched her as I was pinned on the ground. Then, they let me up, lectured me that I could've been shot, and allowed me to leave."

    Lang says he walked up the ramp out of the garage. In front of him were photographers from other stations, all thinking he'd gotten the shot. But, he didn't. Walking away, feeling dejected, he headed for his camera car. But, he couldn't find it.

    It had been towed.

    "I went home and told my dad about it," he says. "He felt bad for me, but we had a good laugh about it. The next day, I got a call from the U.S. Marshal, who said he felt bad about what happened. So, they assigned me to Patty to be the cameraman during her court appearances and trial. It was me and Al Bullock, doing duty."

    Lang covered Hearst's trial from beginning to end.

    Why is Lang, who is a member of the Board of Governors of the San Francisco/Northern California Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, able to tell the story now, after all these years?

    "My dad died in February at the age of 87. Out of respect for him, and the work he did with the FBI, I could never say anything. But now, I want people to know what he did for me. That he was the one who helped me to break the story."

 

Soundbites
Soundbites/Kevin logo   
Cheryl Jennings is an Emmy� Award-winner who was inducted into the NATAS Silver Circle in 2003 and received the Chapters Governors' Award in 2009.  Jennings has worked as a news anchor and reporter for KGO-TV ABC7 in San Francisco since 1979. Next year is a big year for her, when she marks her 35th year with the station. Jennings is known for her hard work and dedication to her craft as much as she is for her kindness, generosity and her easygoing personality. She also lovingly embraces a characteristic her parents instilled in her: a strong commitment to charity. Want to find out more about her, including her weakness for chocolate? Here's your chance!

 

 

Where did you grow up?

I AM AN ARMY BRAT. MY DAD WAS IN THE MILITARY AND WE TRAVELED ALL OVER THE WORLD. WE MOVED EVERY TWO TO THREE YEARS. I THINK I MUST HAVE GONE TO 15 DIFFERENT SCHOOLS BEFORE WE ARRIVED AT THE PRESIDIO OF SAN FRANCISCO.  I WAS BORN AT FT. BENNING, GEORGIA.

 

Do you have siblings? If so, are you the oldest? Youngest?

I AM THE ELDEST DAUGHTER OF SEVEN CHILDREN: 5 GIRLS, TWO BOYS. ONE BROTHER, SADLY, PASSED AWAY FROM HEALTH PROBLEMS.

 

When did you first realize that you wanted to be in television news?

I KNEW I WANTED TO BE IN BROADCASTING AFTER I DID A COLLEGE PAPER FOR A WOMEN'S STUDIES CLASS.  I INTERVIEWED FOUR WOMEN IN BROADCASTING BECAUSE IT WAS SUCH A RARE THING IN THE MID 70S: KARNA SMALL, MARCIA BRANDWYNNE, ROXANNE RUSSELL, GERI LANGE.

 

Who has inspired you in your career?

THOSE WOMEN INSPIRED ME. MY FIRST OFFICIAL MENTOR WAS JANE MORRISON WITH KNBR RADIO, WHO ALLOWED ME TO WORK FOR FREE FOR 50 HOURS A WEEK AS AN INTERN.  I DID THAT FOR FIVE MONTHS, BEFORE I FINALLY GOT A PAYING JOB ANSWERING PHONES, WHILE I WAS IN COLLEGE.

 

Who has inspired you as a person?

MY PARENTS.  THEY HAD AN INCREDIBLE WORK ETHIC, A COMMITMENT TO CHARITY AND THEY NEVER GAVE UP ON SITUATIONS, NO MATTER HOW DIFFICULT.

 

Before ABC7, where did you work before?

I STARTED AT KNBR AS AN INTERN, EVENTUALLY BECAME A NEWS SECRETARY FOR KNBR AND KNAI (ALL NEWS FM RADIO STATION-NOW GONE). THEN I WAS ALLOWED ON THE FRIDAY NIGHT OVERNIGHT SHIFT, AFTER MY SECRETARY JOB WAS DONE IN THE DAYTIME.  THEN, I WENT TO KNBR RADIO. KPIX WAS HIRING AND LOOKING FOR A WOMAN FOR THEIR AFFIRMATIVE PROGRAM.  I GOT THE JOB AND CONTINUED TO WORK FOR K101 AND KPIX AT THE SAME TIME FOR A YEAR...MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, FROM 9:30 AM TO 5:30PM AT K101, THEN KPIX FROM 6PM TO 11:30PM.  THEN, I CAME TO KGO AS THE NIGHT REPORTER AND WORKED MY WAY UP FROM THERE.

 

As an anchor, every day at work is different from the one before it. Can you describe a "day in the life of Cheryl Jennings"?

THERE IS NO TYPICAL DAY.  I DO A LOT OF CHARITY WORK IN ADDITION TO MY ANCHORING, REPORTING AND SHOW HOSTING DUTIES. SO I MAY HOST A BREAKFAST FOR THE RED CROSS AT 7:30AM, COME TO WORK, HOST A LUNCHEON OR EVENING EVENT AFTER WORK.

 

You're an anchor at one of the best stations in the country and certainly in one of the world's best cities. And, you've worked at the same station for nearly 35 years. What is the secret?

I WORK AT A GREAT STATION AND I LOVE WHAT I DO.  I GET A LOT OF JOY WORKING AT A STATION THAT UNDERSTANDS WE PROVIDE A PUBLIC SERVICE.

 

Do you like ice cream? Okay, that's a loaded question. Of course, you do! What's your favorite flavor?

CHOCOLATE WOULD BE AT THE TOP OF MY LIST, WITH FUDGE ON TOP!  BROWNIES OR FUDGE WOULD HIGHER ON THE LIST....I'M ALWAYS SEARCHING FOR THE PERFECT CHOCOLATE TREAT! (CHOCOHOLIC)

 

Tell us about your home life. How do you spend your weekends?

I DO A NUMBER OF CHARITY EVENTS ON WEEKENDS. AND THE WEEKENDS ARE SO BUSY, I HAVE TO SCHEDULE IN TIME FOR MY FAMILY AND MY HUSBAND!  WE LOVE TO HIKE WHENEVER POSSIBLE. WE ALSO LOVE TO WATCH MOVIES.

 

I know you support many charitable organizations. Please tell me about all of them.

I'LL JUST LIST SOME OF THEM, THERE ARE MANY!  PERFORMING STARS OF MARIN, TAYLOR FAMILY FOUNDATION, CAMP OKIZU, SAN FRANCISCO CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION CENTER. AMBASSADORS OF HOPE AND OPPORTUNITY, TENDERLOIN NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT CORPORTATION AND THE TENDERLOIN AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. STAND FOR FAMILIES FREE OF VIOLENCE, BONNIE J. ADDARIO LUNG CANCER FOUNDATION, RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE OF SAN FRANCISCO AND PALO ALTO, OAKLAND BALLET.

 

Perfect meal for dinner?

SEARED AHI OR SUSHI

 

Have a guilty pleasure?

A FRIDAY NIGHT MARTINI

 

What do you enjoy most about your work?

EVERY DAY IS DIFFERENT AND I GET TO MEET NEW PEOPLE AND LEARN NEW THINGS CONSTANTLY.

 

What do you do to relax? What hobbies and/or activities are you involved with?

I WOULD LIKE TO LEARN TO PLAY GOLF...NO TIME FOR HOBBIES RIGHT NOW

 

Where do you see yourself in the next 5 to 10 years?

TELLING GOOD STORIES AS LONG AS POSSIBLE, AND PLANNING TO TAKE AN EDITING AND PHOTOGRAPHY CLASS TO ENHANCE MY SKILLS.

 

Who is your favorite television journalist?

BARBARA WALTERS. SMART, STRONG, TALENTED SURVIVOR AND A GREAT ROLE MODEL

 

Do you have a favorite author?

KHALED HOSSEINI, PATRICIA CORNWELL, TOM CLANCY

 

San Francisco Chronicle, or USA Today?

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE AND THE MARIN INDEPENDENT JOURNAL

 

If you could do it all over again, is there anything you would change about your life?

I WOULD FINISH MY BACHELOR'S DEGREE AT SAN FRANCISCO STATE.

 

Any words of wisdom for the next generation of television journalists?

LEARN MULTIMEDIA SKILLS AND HOW TO WRITE. WRITING IS EVERYTHING!

 

Favorite vacation destination?  

KONA, HAWAII

 

During your career, has there been a news story or stories that you've "owned" that, up to now, has defined who you are as a journalist?

1989 LOMA PRIETA EARTHQUAKE. I WAS THE FIRST LOCAL REPORTER ON THE AIR, COVE

RING THE STORY WHILE THE AFTERSHOCKS WERE ROCKING OUR BUILDING, NOT KNOWING WHAT HAD HAPPENED TO MY OWN LARGE BAY AREA FAMILY.

 

What's the most favorite thing about your job? Least favorite thing, if anything?

LEAST FAVORITE PART OF THE JOB IS THE AMOUNT OF TIME IT TAKES AWAY FROM MY FAMILY.

 

Favorite music? What's in your iPod (if you have one) or collection of CDs?

NO TIME TO LISTEN TO MUSIC. I LISTEN TO NEWS RADIO.

 

Wine tasting, or a cold bottle of beer?

WINE TASTING!

 

What's the craziest thing you've ever done?

TRAVELED TO AFGHANISTAN FOR A STORY.

 

From a journalistic standpoint, how would you prefer viewers to see you?

SOMEONE THEY CAN TRUST TO DELIVER ACCURATE NEWS THAT WILL HELP IN SOME WAY.

 

Favorite spot in the Bay Area? Favorite vacation destination? Where have you yet to travel to?

NAPA VALLEY. I WANT TO VISIT CHINA, JAPAN, SINGAPORE, INDIA, RUSSIA, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND MORE!

 

What do you like about social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus? Does it help bring in new viewers?

I LIKE USING SOCIAL MEDIA TO KEEP ME IN DIRECT CONTACT WITH VIEWERS OR POTENTIAL VIEWERS. 

 

Stay tuned: In the December edition of Soundbites, find out more about Kopi Sotiropulos, morning news anchor and all-around funny guy at KMPH in Fresno. 

 

Fresno's Collective Effort A Great Idea
Chapter Governors Representing Central Valley City, 
meet to talk about the NATAS Mission



By Richard Harmelink
Vice President, Fresno

    The Fresno members of the Board of Governors of the San Francisco/Northern California Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences met in Fresno in October with Darryl Compton, the Chapter's executive director, to collaborate on ideas and issues pertaining to NATAS in Fresno and the organization overall.
    Chapter Governors Zara ArboledaSandy SiriasKim Stephens, Stephanie Stone, Justin Willis and Fresno Vice President Richard Harmelink met with Compton for lunch in Fresno for the first time as a group.
    This is something that the Fresno governors would like to do once a year to discuss ideas and issues pertaining to the Fresno market's involvement in the Chapter.  
    It was a productive lunch and it was great to get together to bounce ideas off each other and see how we can be more productive in our NATAS roles and further the mission of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.  
 
 

The Health Reporter

health rep header 

 

 

Fall and its emerging warm glow signal it's time to evolve. Just like the deciduous trees that let go of the old leaves to prepare for the new, television abandons last year's programming and rolls out their new fall schedule. Fall is jam-packed with many new shows, long-awaited new episodes, rising stars, and refreshed sets. It's a great time for you to change too. That is, shed your old ways of eating and try some new foods, techniques and recipes! If you haven't already given some of these fall all-stars a try, consider adding a few of the following to your plate this season.

     Butternut Squash: This versatile deep orange vegetable can be substituted for any recipe calling for pumpkin. Butternut squash can be roasted, grilled and pur�ed or mashed for soups, casseroles and breads. They are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, a good source of vitamin E, fiber, potassium, and magnesium and contain no cholesterol or fat. Compared to pumpkin, butternut squash has twice the amount of A and C.  

    Japanese Persimmons (or "kaki"): These golden jewels come in several varieties, shapes, colors, and sizes. The rounded, crunchier Fuyu persimmon is squat like a tomato and makes a great snack (eat it like an apple). Fuyus add bright orange color and sweetness to an all-green salad.

    Another popular variety, the heart-shaped Hachiya persimmon, is larger in size with a more pointed bottom and is meant to be eaten soft -- almost 'gushy'. You can use the thick, pulpy jelly to make persimmon bread and cookies as they're a great source of vitamin A, C and fiber.

Traditional to Japan, Hachiyas are hand-peeled, individually hung and delicately hand-massaged for a dried fruit delicacy. For a frozen treat, freeze a whole well-ripened Hachiya in a cup (pointed bottom side up). Thaw slightly when ready to eat and dive in with a spoon for an all-natural 'sorbet'.

     A third type, the Chocolate persimmon, is highly sought after, smaller in size, and has a dark brown flesh. They can be found at specialty or farmers markets. Be patient when waiting for persimmons to ripen. If eaten before they're fully ripe, they can be very bitter and they're well worth the wait.

    Asian Pears (or "nashi pears"): Asian Pears are large in size and are also known as 'apple pears' due to their shape and crisp texture. They're a prized fruit in Japan where they're actually wrapped and sold individually in a decorative box. Ripe Asian pears are very juicy, fragrant and crunchy - unlike soft traditional pears. They're a great source of fiber and vitamin C and free of fat, cholesterol and sodium.

    Sweet Potatoes: Rich in beta carotene which impart their golden orange color, sweet potatoes are high in vitamin A and C and a good source of fiber and potassium. Steamed or microwaved, they make a satisfying side. Sweet potato pie is a Southern classic made with lots of butterfat. But with a bit of a makeover (recipe to be posted), sweet potato pie (topped with nonfat whipped cream!) makes a satisfying breakfast and a heavenly alternative to buttery candied sweet potatoes and traditional pumpkin pie.

    Beets: Beetroot, especially when roasted, is an excellent base for salads as well as a sweet, colorful and delicious addition. Beets are a good source of folate, vitamin C and potassium. Recent research has shown that drinking beetroot juice can reduce blood pressure due to its high nitrate content.  Also, scientists have found that the nitrates in beets can improve blood flow to the brain and thus, improve mental performance.

    Be a Healthy Adventurer! Fall is an excellent time to make changes in your life as fall is all about preparing for new growth. In life, you're either in a state of growth or decay. Think about taking one small adventurous step toward getting healthier each day. By doing so, in a year, you will have made a significant change in your life.

   

    Fit Tip:  Don't dwell on that morsel of a brownie you couldn't resist. Beating yourself up because you "went off your diet" will only bring on feelings of failure and defeat. At the end of each day, ask yourself what you did to get you closer to your goal. Those are the kinds of thoughts that will propel you forward and sustain your motivation.

 

Evox Television Focuses On Healthy Lifestyles

By Kym McNicholas
Chapter Secretary
 
      When I was in sixth grade, a substitute teacher decided to hold a classroom-wide discussion about The Cosby Show from the night before. Everyone in the class seemed to have watched the episode but me. Ten years later, I saw her at a local grocery store and she remembered me as the girl whose parents wouldn't let her watch prime-time television. I guess we were abnormal, focusing on family time and homework.

Today, I'm making up for lost time, watching everything and anything I can. I am up on every single new show and network that pops up. There are hundreds of new channels available today. And, of course, I have to check out every single one of them. So, I'm certainly the most annoying person to watch television with, as I'm constantly channel-surfing. There are so many choices, though, that I wonder how all of these networks are able to make money. Advertisers only want to be where the eyes are and they're more spread out than ever.

In comes Evox Television, a new network focusing on a healthy lifestyle and feel-good content. It's taking a different approach to making money. Founder/CEO Xav Dubois created a marketplace for products featured in the network's various series, such as celebrity environmentalist Ed Begley Jr.'s On Begley Street, a show documenting the construction of his second greenest home. Begley has his own page in the marketplace that features and sells all of the products he's chosen to use for his home.

For some of the other products in the overall Evox marketplace, content is created around them. That's where this network could walk a very fine line that, in many folks' eyes, could be seen as paid-for-content. But Dubois explains... it's just the opposite. Interested? 

 
Bay Area Black Journalists Association Scholarship Luncheon Nov. 8 In San Francisco
James Beard Foundation Awards Accepting Entries 
For Broadcast, New Media Awards 

 

      The 2014 James Beard Foundation Awards are now accepting entries for the Broadcast& New Media Awards. Entry forms are completed online and can be found at 

https://awards.jamesbeard.orgPlease note that for all entries besides Outstanding Personality/Host, judges look for: the entry's content, originality, execution, and overall appeal.

       For the Outstanding Personality/Host category, judges look for: the host's knowledge of content, presentation, communication skills, style and appeal.

      Fees are $100 per entry for members and $135 for non-members. (On the payment page, there is an option for non-members to become members for $29.)

      The Broadcast and New Media entry deadline is Jan. 9, 2014.  Nominees will be announced on March 18, 2014 and their submissions posted on the James Beard website.   

      The Book, Broadcast, and Journalism Awards Dinner will be on May 2, 2014 in New York City.

 

Tim Ayers, 70, Longtime KTVU Video Editor
Worked At Oakland Station From 1995 To 2007

By Kevin Wing
Vice President, San Francisco

       Tim Ayers, a longtime video editor at KTVU Channel 2 in Oakland from 1995 to 2007, died Oct. 7 at his home in San Francisco.
Tim Ayers
Former KTVU Editor Died Oct. 7 At 70
       Ayers recently celebrated his 70th birthday.
       He was surrounded by family and friends at the time of his death.
       His brother, Bill, says Ayers died suddenly after being diagnosed with inoperable lung cancer. Doctors gave him only hours to live.
       Bill Ayers says his brother, upon learning of the diagnosis, said "I've had a good life."
       "He was where he wanted to be, and he retained his good spirit and sense of humor to the end, reflecting on his great good fortune and the good and full life that he'd lived," Bill Ayers says. "It was so sad and beautiful, and Tim was filled with grace throughout."
       Tim Ayers lived in San Francisco for 45 years. Besides his work at KTVU, he worked in video production and was a television cameraman and editor. He was also a local labor leader and a San Francisco Giants season ticketholder. 
       "We all miss him horribly," Bill Ayers says. "We all hold him near."
       A memorial service will be held on Nov. 8. At 1:30 p.m., there will be a gathering at the Public House at AT&T Park. The services will held from 2 to 3 p.m. A reception will follow at the Bell Tower, 1900 Polk St., San Francisco.

TV A Go Go...

New Beginnings and Opportunities Around the Chapter

         

      Kathy Escobar has been promoted to senior assignment editor at KXTV in Sacramento. She joined the station in 2012 after working across town at KTXL.  Kathy has been an outstanding force on our desk since coming over from Fox40 in 2012. 

      Barnett Parker joins KXTV as weekend assignment editor. Parker is currently working as a copy editor at the Las Vegas Review Journal newspaper. He has more than 15 years' TV assignment desk experience. Most recently, he worked at KVVU in Las Vegas. He was also an assignment editor at KIRO in Seattle, and had assignment desk positions in A;buquerque and Denver. Parker's first day was Oct. 28. 

     Carlos Saucedo joins KXTV as a general assignment reporter on Nov. 11.  For the last two years, he has been a reporter at KFSN in Fresno. Prior to that, he worked at KWTX in Waco, Texas. Saucedo was also an assistant correspondent for the BBC in Washington, D.C., and was a press fellow for Sen. Harry Reid.  
 
     Got a new gig? Get a promotion? TV A Go Go and Off Camera want to know and help you spread the word! Please drop us a line at

kevin.offcamera@gmail.com and let us know! Congratulations!

 

Do You Remember When?


Before It Became
ABC7 News, It Was
News Scene.
How many faces from the KGO-TV newsroom of yesteryear can you name? We want to know! If you know their names, please write us and we'll mention your name in the December issue of Off Camera, along with their names! Drop us a line at kevin.offcamera@gmail.com.
 
KITV Supports Breast Cancer Awareness Month

 


KITV in Honolulu, a big sponsor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, served as a co-sponsor of the Hawaii Komen Race For The Cure. KITV's Kenny Choi interviews Pamela Young at the widely-attended event.

Mobile TV: The Present And The Future
Join Broadcasters At Free Live Webcast Nov. 13

      The mobile TV marketplace is growing, and television station not already on board could rik being left behind.
      Are you in the know? Broadcasters can catch up on the latest developments in mobile TV at a free, live webcast event hosted by the National Association of Broadcasters, in conjunction with the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, on Nov. 13, 3:30-5 p.m. Pacific. The webcast will originate from NAB headquarters in Washington, D.C. 
      With mobile TV already operating in 35 markets across the nation, and industry leaders -- like Dyle TV -- expecting new devices to hit the market this holiday season, this is a good time for broadcasters to discover what all the excitement is about. 
      The event will include a nuts and bolts discussion of the basics of mobile TV, which allows broadcasters to transmit their broadcast programming, including sports, news and entertainment, over a portion of their existing spectrum to compatioble mobile devices. Broadcasters are expanding the TV viewing market beyond the traditional living room, allowing viewers to take their favorite shows with them, tuning in anytime from anywhere. Fueling the development of mobile TV is the public's voracious appetite for watching video contenton the go. Small upgrades to transmission facilities allow broadcasters to join the mobile video phenomenon. 
      Industry leaders participating include: Rick Kaplan, NAB executive vice president of strategic planning; Salil Dalvi, general manager and strategist focused on digital media and mobile at NBC Universal and of the Mobile Content Venture, the joint venture responsible for the Dyle TV brand; Sam Matheny, vice president of Capitol Broadcasting Company and member of Mobile 500; and Rick Ducey, digital media expert at BIA/Kelsey.
      The event will provide an overview of how mobile TV is being rolled out in the United States, technical capabilities of the mobile TV signal, the mobile emergency alert system, content updates and business issues. 
      The webcast is free to members of NAB, NATAS and invited guests. Register for the webcast at www.emmyonline.org/webcast.

 

DirecTV, Time Warner Cable, Charter Considering Free Broadcast TV Signals
    
       DirecTV, Time Warner Cable Inc. and Charter Communications Inc. are considering capturing free broadcast-TV signals to avoid paying billions of dollars in so-called retransmission fees.
       Aereo, which charges $8 a month for online access to broadcast TV, is locked in a court battle with CBS Corp. and other media companies over the legality of its service. If Aereo prevails, cable companies could use the same approach to bypass the fees they now pay for network signals, said the people, who asked not to be identified because the discussions are at an early stage. 
      Time Warner Cable has even considered buying Aereo. 
      Aereo's legal fight pits the New York-based startup against some of the world's largest media companies, including Walt Disney Co., 21st Century Fox Inc. and Comcast Corp.'s NBCUniversal. The broadcasters are trying to preserve their ability to charge retransmission fees, which let pay-TV companies air CBS, ABC, NBC and Fox on their systems. 
     Federal regulators require pay-TV systems to gain consent from TV stations to rebroadcast their signals. The networks, including Spanish-language broadcasters Univision Communications Inc. and NBCUniversal's Telemundo, own many of their stations. Others are affiliates owned by companies including Sinclair Broadcast Group, Tribune Co., Hearst Corp. and Gannett Co. The networks are beginning to share in the fees collected by their affiliates. 'Plucking' Signals Retransmission fees in the U.S. are expected to double to $6.1 billion in 2018 from $3.01 billion this year, according to research firm SNL Kagan. 
     The fees are essential to the broadcast TV industry, Fox President and Chief Operating Officer Chase Carey said in April. If Aereo is permitted to stay in business, Fox's broadcast network will convert into a cable channel and cease to provide over-the-air access, he said at the time. 
     CBS CEO Leslie Moonves says he would do the same, as did Univision Chairman Haim Saban. Cable companies are within their rights seeking to match Aereo's ability, if it stands up in court, to capture free broadcast signals rather than pay for land-based access, said Leo Hindery, managing partner of New York-based private equity fund InterMedia Partners and former chairman of the YES Network. 

 

Contact Information:

National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences
San Francisco/Northern California Chapter
Darryl Compton,
Executive Director
4317 Camden Avenue
San Mateo, CA 94403-5007
Phone: 650 341-7786 or 415 777-0212
Fax: 650 372-0279
darryl@emmysf.tv

 

The name "Emmy�" and the graphic image of the statuette, are registered trademarks of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.