N O V E M B E R    2 0 1 7
CALENDAR of EVENTS
2017
JANUARY 
ADOPT a WORKOUT
PARTNER

FEBRUARY
ADOPT 'THE ONE'
 
MARCH
SPAY and NEUTER AWARENESS

TCWC WILDLIFE WORKSHOP
Friday the 24th
at the Feed Barn
 
APRIL
TRAP/NEUTER/RELEASE

BIRD REHABILITATION
Saturday the 1st
at the Paws Center

BIRD REHABILITATION
Saturday the 8th
at the Paws Center

MAY
Find your MISSING PET

WHISKERS & WINE 
Friday the 19th at  Jackson Rancheria

JUNE  
FELINE FRENZY

CORKS for CRITTERS
Thursday the 22nd at Volcano Union Pub
  
JULY 
ADOPT a SENIOR PET

AUGUST
$9 for 9 LIVES for 9 DAYS

SEPTEMBER 
ADOPT your MVP

PAWS & CLAWS (TCWC)
at American Legion Hall

BARK in the PARK 
Saturday the 30th at Detert Park, Jackson

OCTOBER  
ORANGE & BLACK
All Treats, no Tricks

NOVEMBER  
GIVING THANKS 
Animals and their people

DECEMBER  
Bring JOY to your WORLD

SANTA PAWS
Saturday the 2nd
at the Feed Barn


LINKS





 










Why we are thankful for 
PAWS PARTNERS

Amador Shelter Partners, A-PAL, TCWC, ACART, Twin Cedar Second Chance Dog Rescue: Who are these partners whose logos you see in our newsletter masthead, and how do they work together? It is the mission of PawsPartners.org to provide a web presence for the organizations within our community that work together for the welfare of animals; to be "An Alliance for the Animals". November is a good time to give thanks for these partners in our animal community.




In 1978, a group of animal loving Amador County residents created 
A-PAL Humane Society with the goal of promoting the humane treatment of animals in Amador County.  A-PAL Humane Society has accomplished so many positive changes, including: 

Initiating the volunteer program at ACAC & AC

Promoting the spay or neuter of all shelter animals prior to adoption

A certificate program to assist residents with spay and neuter costs
For your tireless efforts and programs which benefit all our domestic animals, both pets and feral, community cats, barn cats, shelter animals, and so many others--plus the endless fundraising needed to keep these crucial programs solvent







ACART formed in 2009 when concerned residents met with ACAC and the Amador Fire Safe Council to discuss the need for domestic animal evacuation and sheltering during wildfires and other natural disasters. In 2013, its members were registered as Disaster Service Workers, qualifying them to staff and conduct shelter activities supporting county residents in emergencies. In July 2014, ACART established its first live disaster shelter in response to the Sand Fire, which involved  Amador and El Dorado counties. During the 2015 Butte Fire, 448 animals were safely housed and returned to the owners. ACART is a volunteer organization depending entirely on grants and donations. It is a non-profit 501(c) (3) under the Community Foundation of Amador County. 
 
For donating the endless hours necessary to maintain monthly training and on-call availability, and for running the risk when relocating and sheltering large and small domestic animals from natural disasters, especially in this rural all-terrain community. 



Tri County Wildlife Care was founded in 1994 and became a non-profit 501 (c) (3) in 1995. They saw the need for wildlife rescue and education and sought to serve Amador, Calaveras and San Joaquin Counties. The founders applied for and received a California Department of Fish and Game Rehabilitation Permit and a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Migratory Bird Permit.  An intake area was created where the public could drop off wildlife in need of care. There was space for a songbird nursery as well. Non-songbird species were taken for offsite rehab in quiet locations with specialized caging for the species in rehab. In March, 2016 TCWC moved into its new home, sharing space and resources with A-PAL Humane Society at 80 Ridge Road. 

For extending a significant helping hand (by way of rescue and rehabilitation) to the imperiled wildlife in our region, and for promoting wildlife education so that we can understand and appreciate who they are and their role in our ever-expanding range.



The brainchild of dog trainer Margaret Blair, Second Chance started in April of 2005 as a response to the unfortunate number of dogs being euthanized in both Amador and Calaveras counties for behavioral problems that she felt were correctable. It maintains an ongoing training program for one dog at a time from each of the two counties, until they are ready for adoption into a loving home. The dogs go directly to their new homes from Twin Cedar, without having to return to the shelter environment. Since Second Chance's inception, 88 lives (and counting) have been saved through the program.  Check out the Twin Cedar K-9  Second Chance Alumni web page to see the happy graduates.

THANK YOU, Margaret and Co: for donating massive amounts of time, patience, and talent to the neediest of canine clients, so that their lives do not end unnecessarily.




This is the "partnership" hand of ACAC & AC. The Amador County Animal Control Department operates the shelter within the County administration.  Animal Control's duties are to impound stray animals, pick up and provide medical care for sick and injured animals, issue citations for violations of the law; rescue endangered animals, investigate the inhumane treatment of animals, investigate animal nuisances, maintain bite records for the HO, and many more. SHELTER PARTNERS coordinates the Animal Control Adoption Center with the other animal advocates in the partnership and produces this newsletter to promote the adoption of our shelter animals.

For going beyond the limits of your job descriptions to provide the little extras that help animals in the shelter stay healthy and happy, like home-made chicken broth popsicles, 'ensuite' wading pools, special meals for those with sensitive digestions, and the caring and kindnesses that exceed "humane".


THANKS: to the animals trained to help us   
We give thanks this month, as we should every month, to animals that provide services to us humans. It is easy enough to purchase official-looking vests and patches online, but it can be difficult to know the difference between the classifications of animals that provide us with such valuable assistance. What training does it take to be a therapy dog?  A service dog?  The information provided here will help clarify these differences.
THANKS, THANKS...
To Linda French of Possibili-Teas, who, once again devoted her time, effort, and considerable talents to make her September fundraiser, "The Pioneer Gold Rush Jubilee" a big success. A total of $650 was raised for the Rusty Fund.

To Norm Vogt and his dog, Stella, in whose memory the October Bingo night at St. Katharine Drexel Catholic Parish netted $2,500 to help build ACAC & AC's barn. Catholic bingo is powerful!
...and more THANKS.
To the wonderful people who foster animals for A-PAL and ACAC & AC year after year, one of whom's story is featured below in the TAIL of the MONTH. Read on.
CALVIN C: a foster failure

One Tuesday afternoon I was at the shelter to walk the dogs on my shift when Andrea and Kelly asked me to meet Cal, a pup who needed fostering. He had arrived with an injury, and had just had surgery to repair his femur. Cal needed to be exercised, gently and regularly, or he would not recover well.


There he stood, about nine or ten weeks old, a gangling, long-legged black pup wearing a huge Elizabethan collar and a wagging tail. I took Cal home.  He was gentle and sweet, and soon he could leave the cumbersome collar behind, at least for awhile. After three months of fostering, I knew Cal was going to stay. He played well with the little dog, Birdie, and respected the old dogs who no longer wished to tumble and run. Cal became 'Calvin' as in Calvin Coolidge. He needed a bigger name to match his very big personality and his huge paws.

Calvin's difficulties were not yet over; he would need two more surgeries on the head of his femur, which grew painful bone spurs during the healing process.

Calvin recovered nicely after his surgery. Bird, his soulmate and sister, who is also the Florence Nightingale of the pack, looked after him during his recovery.
















Calvin and Bird became inseparable friends.

Calvin blossomed into the sweetest dog, acting like a surrogate mother to litters of foster puppies that came to the house. Bird was a little less certain about those puppies.






Sadly, there was yet another surgery; number three.



Calvin ultimately regained full use of his leg. He became a great athlete, swimming, playing Frisbee, and leaping into the air to catch a ball.






Calvin is now six years old, in his prime, still quite puppy-like, and the most wonderful failed foster pup I could ever have imagined.


from Elena Knox, "Failed" Foster Mom and valued volunteer







IF YOU HAVE A GREAT ADOPTION STORY FROM OUR SHELTER,
we'd love to hear from you. Send your story, with photos if you have them, to Lisa Peterson.
petreher1@yahoo.com


SAVE the DATE

RED ALERT! Thinking of becoming a VOLUNTEER?
The need for volunteers  at Amador County Animal Control & Adoption Center has reached a critical level. I f you think you'd like to join our ranks, please, drop by to the shelter at 12340 Airport Road in Martell and request a volunteer application. We desperately need dog walkers, but anything you are able to do will help immensely. You can review  the  APPLICATION for VOLUNTEER WORKER   here, but you will need to fill out an original pink copy, available from 
the shelter.