PediaStaff
November 26, 2010: Issue 11, Volume 4

It's All About the Choices!

Greetings and Happy 'Day After Turkey' Day. I wonder how many people end up napping on the couch wherever they sat down after dinner? Someone needs to take a survey. Well, if you are one of them, wake up now, because we have a great newsletter issue for you.

News Items:
  • ASHA Wrap-up and #SLPeeps
  • More Bullying Resources in the News
  • People Who Stutter Show Abnormal Brain Activity When Reading and Listening
  • Newly Identified Brain Pathways Vital to Understanding Language
  • New Approach Finds Success In Teaching Youth With Autism
  • Feel Good Story of the Week: Children with Autism Practice Traveling on Mock Flights
  • Feel Good Video Story of the Week: Kids with Autism Meet 'Sensitive Santa'
Tips, Activities and Resources:
  • Webinar: Development, Validation, and Use of the OASES for Children, Teens, and Adults Who Stutter
  • The Importance of Early Autism Detection and Other ASHA Podcasts
  • Introduction to Friedrich's Ataxia and FARA

Upcoming Events/CEU Opportunities:
  • CASANA Workshop: Childhood Apraxia of Speech - Multisensory Strategies for Evaluation & Therapy Challenges
  • The Sequential Oral Sensory Approach to Feeding Conference Presented by the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation

Articles and Blogs
  • Speech Language Pathology Corner : Four Steps of Communication
  • Occupational Therapy Corner: Why Touch is so Important
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner: The Neuropsychological Evaluation as a Guide to Intervention
  • Q&A: Ask the Expert About Tummy Time
  • Focus on Bilingualism: Using Storybooks in Therapy
  • Guest Blog: Case Presentation - The Beauty of Imitation and An Update
  • Guest Blog: A Myriad of Materials
  • Worth Repeating: Serving Students with Hearing Loss in the Schools: Speech and Language Services for Students in the Mainstream
  • Also Worth Repeating: Playing with Self Esteem: The Importance of Social Skills

Please note: Much of our content here is provided by wonderful contributing authors and organizations. Please support our contributors and visit their websites. Links and bios are featured on each article!


Have a great weekend and see you next month! As an FYI, the December monthly issue will be published on December 17th. There will be no newsletter either December 24th or 31st so that our staff may enjoy their holiday season.


Heidi Kay, Newsletter Editor






The Career Center

The links to the right are "live" and reflect all open jobs with PediaStaff. To further narrow your search by state use the drop down menus on the search page to select a specific state. If a particular search is returning no hits it is Girlpossible that we do not currently have openings
for you in that state.

If any of your information (geographic, population or setting preference) has changed since we've last spoken, please let us know. See an opening that interests you? Just apply to that job and one of our staff will contact you right away.

Remember, one of the things that makes PediaStaff unique is that we will actively "market" your skills to prospective employers of pediatric and school based therapists, so if you don't see a position that interests you make sure you let us know what you are looking for.
Speech Language Pathologist and SLPA Jobs


Occupational Therapist and COTA Jobs


Physical Therapist and PTA Jobs



School Psychologist Jobs



ASHA 2010 - Wrap-up and #SLPeeps
What a great show we had. Thanks to everyone who stopped by our booth to meet our entire team face to face (and get a free Toobaloo!). It was wonderful that so many of you stopped by. Thanks too to all of our newsletter and blog contributors who visited.

We also really enjoyed the first annual ASHA "Tweet-up." Even though it was really early in the morning, there were lots of "speechies who tweet" (known affectionately as #SLPeeps") present that got to chat in person and "put a face with the twitter handle!"


Speaking of Twitter, if you are an SLP or assistant, please join us on Twitter. Use the hashtag "#slpeeps" at the end of your post and you will be sure to meet LOTS of new friends interested in sharing ideas and resources.


Read The Rest of this Blog Post to see a Photo from ASHA and Learn how to get the #SLPeeps Feed HERE
Bullying Resources in the News - From the CNN Stop Bullying Campaign
[Source: CNN.com]

Editor's Note: We realize that we already featured a list of Bullying Resources in a recent issue. However, CNN has recently completed a big campaign in conjunction with "Stop Bullying Now," so we thought we would also bring you their list of resources as some are different than what we have already shown you.

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog
Stuttering in the News - People Who Stutter Show Abnormal Brain Activity When Reading and Listening
[Source: ScienceDaily.com]

A new imaging study finds that people who stutter show abnormal brain activity even when reading or listening. The results suggest that individuals who stutter have impaired speech due to irregular brain circuits that affect several language processing areas - not just the ones for speech production.

The research was presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, held in San Diego.

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog
Language Development Research in the News - Newly Identified Brain Pathways Vital to Understanding Language
[Source: ScienceDaily.com]

A complex network of brain connections necessary for language comprehension has been mapped in new detail, according to recent research. These newly charted pathways will help scientists understand how language is processed in the brain, and how brain injuries disrupt the system.

The research was presented at Neuroscience 2010, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, held in San Diego.

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog
Autism in the News - New Approach Finds Success In Teaching Youth With Autism
As the number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders continues to increase, the one thing that won't change is the need for those children to develop social skills. Statistics show that if these students are able to communicate effectively, they can achieve success in the classroom, and later, in the workplace. In addition to the challenges facing each individual student, educators find themselves facing dwindling resources. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri are developing an effective social competence curriculum, with a virtual classroom component, that could help educators meet the demand of this growing population.

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog
Feel Good Story of the Week - Children with Autism Practice Traveling on Mock Flights
[Source: The Philadelphia Inquirer]

At 8 p.m. Saturday, Southwest Airlines Flight 2149 was poised to push back from the gate. Flight attendants gave fasten-seat-belt instructions, and First Officer Peter Hayes announced, "There's 25 minutes of flight time until we touch down in Philadelphia."

Capt. Todd Siems said the Boeing airliner was cruising at 37,000 feet. And after he turned off the seat-belt sign, the young passengers were served complimentary Sprite, cranberry-apple juice, and airplane-shaped crackers.

Read the Rest of this Story Through a Link on our Blog
Feel Good Video Story of the Week - Kids with Autism Meet 'Sensitive Santa'
[Source: WDTN.com]

MIAMI TWP., Ohio (WDTN) - Meeting Santa is a Christmas tradition, but for some kids with autism it's just not possible to brave the crowds and noise. That's why the Dayton Mall opened early Sunday for a "Sensitive Santa" event.

Organizers provided lower lighting and quieter surroundings to help kids relax while they waited to see Santa.

"It's very nice to give children the opportunity who may have never visited santa before the opportunity to come, see santa, kind of on their own terms," said David Casper, Marketing Director at the Dayton Mall.

Read and Watch the Rest of this Story Through a Link on our Blog
Therapy Resource of the Week - Webinar: Development, Validation, and Use of the OASES for Children, Teens, and Adults Who Stutter
[Source: Pearson]

On November 1, 2010, J. Scott Yaruss, PhD, CCC-SLP, BRS-FD, ASHA Fellow, presented the webinar "Development, Validation, and Use of the OASES for Children, Teens, and Adults Who Stutter." You can view the recording and/or download the slides below.

Therapy Resource: - The Importance Of Early Autism Detection and other ASHA Podcasts
Have you discovered the ASHA Podcasts? If not, check them out at http://podcast.asha.org/
Here is one we thought you might enjoy to get you started!

[Source] ASHA Podcasts

ASHA fellow and speech-language pathologist, Amy Wetherby, discusses how early diagnosis and intervention can make a dramatic difference in treating children with autism. Dr. Wetherby is the Laurel Schendel Professor in the Department of Communication Disorders at Florida State University and Executive Director for the Center for Autism and Related Disabilities.

Listen to this Podcast Through a Link on our Blog

Therapy Resource of the Week - Introduction to Friedrich's Ataxia and FARA
This video is an introduction to Friedreich's Ataxia and the Friedreich's Ataxia Research Alliance (FARA) as told by interviews with patients, families, researchers, and FARA employees.

Upcoming Event/CEU Opportunity - Childhood Apraxia of Speech: Multisensory Strategies for Evaluation & Therapy Challenges
A day long workshop with National Apraxia expert, David Hammer, M.A., CCC-SLP

Overview:
This presentation will focus on strategies that facilitate verbal communication and speech intelligibility for children with apraxia of speech. Attendees will leave with ideas and strategies that they can begin using immediately with their client population. An overview of diagnostic considerations will be presented. The majority of the presentation will be intervention-based, with a wide range of treatment ideas described.

This workshop is ideal for school, clinic, and outpatient based SLPs working with late toddler's, preschoolers, and early elementary school children, including those who are suspected to have apraxia but not yet diagnosed.

Speaker
Our speaker, David Hammer, M.A., CCC-SLP is widely acclaimed for his "hand-on" practical therapy strategies with this extremely challenging population of children with apraxia of speech. He lectures throughout the United States and internationally. David was a key member of the ASHA committee on Childhood Apraxia of Speech and serves as an advisor to the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America.

Learn More About / Register for This Workshop HERE
CEU Opportunity - The Sequential Oral Sensory Approach to Feeding Conference Presented by the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation
Basic Course - December 1-3, 2010
Advanced Course - December 4-5, 2010
Denver, CO
Featuring Kay A. Toomey, PhD

The Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation is privileged to present Kay A. Toomey, PhD, Pediatric Psychologist, teaching her internationally renowned intervention for problem feeders.

The Sequential Oral Sensory (S.O.S) Approach to Feeding is a family-centered, transdisciplinary program for assessing and treating children with weight/growth problems from birth to 18 years. It integrates postural, sensory, motor, behavioral/ learning, medical and nutritional factors to comprehensively evaluate and manage children with feeding/growth problems.

Learn More About this Great CEU Opportunity
Speech Language Pathology Corner - Four Steps of Communication
By: Michelle Garcia Winner, MA, CCC-SLP

The four steps of communication help to define how the communicative act is heavily anchored in a synergistic process that involves the mind, the body, the eyes and language. More specifically, it involves social emotional thought, the nuance of physical presence and visually processing non-verbal cues in addition to language use and interpretation. As obvious as these steps may sound to the reader, the reality is that most speech and language social treatment programs teach students to focus almost exclusively on their social language production, called 'conversational skills' when teaching students how to be more appropriately social, often working with them seated around therapy tables while practicing having conversations. The four steps of communication strongly encourage us to recognize the social communicative act as being synergistic, always involving the first three steps, but not necessarily involving the fourth.

Step 1: Thinking about others and what they are thinking about us

We think about who we are near or who we want to talk to. If we are going to talk to someone, we consider what information we may already know about this person or what information we can infer based on the situation. For example, if you want to talk to the new student in your class, you have to think about what you may know about that student even if you have never met them before. For example, I know they are new to the class, I know they are a student, I know they live in my community; I know they have been in previous school environments, etc.


Read the Rest of this Article on our Blog
Occupational Therapy Corner: Why Touch is so Important
By: Susan N. Schriber Orloff, OTR/L

Touch is part of everyday life. An average child of 4 feet tall and about 50 pounds has about 1410 square inches/ 9.8 square feet of skin. Each square inch of skin mediates the three major types of receptors: touch, pressure and temperature. And each square inch contains dozens of each type of these receptors. This makes skin a huge sensory conduit to the central nervous system processing our immediate environment as well as being our major alarm system.

The most primitive of the receptors is light touch. It is the feeling of a bug creeping on your leg or arm or a brush of light in your visual field, and it is so distracting that it prohibits attention to any other stimuli until the source of the tactile irritation is resolved.

Pressured touch is very important in the learning the process. It does not require vision, such as light touch does. Pressure allows us to recognize what we are touching and what is doing the touching. Think about the pencil in a child's hand for writing, or knowing where your shoes are under the table without looking for them. Our feet do the "looking". Teaching a child to "look" with their hands may be one of the most important things they can be taught. Automatic writing happens because we know what it should feel like.

Please Read the Rest of this Article on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: The Neuropsychological Evaluation as a Guide to Intervention
By: By: Shahal Rozenblatt, Ph.D., Clinical Neuropsychologist

People are highly complex organisms whose problems are of equal complexity. In order to effectively treat the problems with which people present, we need to have a way of understanding the nature of this complexity, breaking it down so that targeted solutions can be implemented. The neuropsychological evaluation is one such method. This article is meant to serve as an introduction to neuropsychology and neuropsychological evaluations and how they can be helpful to physical, occupational, and speech therapists in developing and guiding interventions.

Neuropsychology is a branch of psychology where the focus is on understanding brain-behavior relationships, using a variety of tests that tap into multiple brain functions in order to gain insight into a person's difficulties. Most clinicians who do this type of work are licensed clinical psychologists with specialized training in and understanding of brain-behavior relationships. Unlike neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and CT scans, that look at structural defects (e.g., tumors), neuropsychology relies on paper-and-pencil and computer based methods to evaluate how specific areas of the brain perform their functions. The goal of a neuropsychological evaluation is not necessarily to determine if a brain injury or other neurological disorder is present, although this certainly can be a component, but to delineate the impact that such a condition can have on the individual's ability to function in his or her environment. For children

Read the Rest of this Article on our Blog
Q&A - Ask the Expert About Tummy Time
By: Pathways Awareness

Q: What are the benefits of tummy time on infant motor development?
A: A policy statement published in 2005 by the American Academy of Pediatrics encourages tummy time when an infant is awake and observed as a means to enhance motor development.(1) Increased tummy time is significant to the earlier attainment of milestones such as rolling over, supported sitting, sitting alone, crawling, and pulling to stand. Additionally, it helps in the development of fine and gross motor skills, improved neck and head control, and stronger back and shoulder muscles.

Further, a study published in Development Medicine and Child Neurology found that healthy infants, born at term, who spent time in prone (on the tummy) when awake, achieved developmental milestones significantly earlier than those who did not or who spent limited time in prone when awake in the first 6 months of life. (2)

Q: Why is tummy time education more important than ever?
A: In a national survey of 400 pediatric physical and occupational therapists, two-thirds of those surveyed said they have seen an increase in early motor delays in infants over the past six years. Of therapists noting an increase in early motor delays, the vast majority named lack of tummy time while awake as the top reason for the increase (3). These results indicate that a considerable amount of parental and professional education on tummy time is still needed.

Read the Rest of this Article on our Blog

Focus on Bilingualism - Using Storybooks in Therapy
By: Scott Prath, M.A., CCC-SLP, Bilinguistics
Ellen Kester, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Bilinguistics
Kara Anderson, M. A., CCC-SLP, Bilinguistics


Many clinicians express frustration that there are not more materials designed for working with a Spanish-speaking population. A book is a great tool. Storybooks are beneficial to the work of speech-language pathologists from both an educational and a practical perspective. Book themes can be selected to allow students to explore fantasies, learn more about the real world, further students' knowledge about current classroom subjects, and introduce new topics. Storybooks can be used with all ages and cultures to address a wide range of goals, including articulation, semantics, syntax, comprehension, pragmatics, and discourse skills.

Books provide a structure for teaching concepts while keeping the student engaged and interested. Story structure additionally assists in retention and retrieval of classroom concepts

Read the Rest of this Article Online on our Blog
Guest Blogs This Week: Easy Speech and Language Ideas, ITeach2Talk
Case Presentation - The Beauty of Imitation and an Update: By: Shareka Bentham, SLT

This is my first of what I hope will be many updates on a patient's progress in therapy. It's good for parents and professionals to see the beauty of progress, to keep them encouraged. I think it is very important therefore to share some stories. Due to confidentiality and other ethical principles we will call this patient Josh.

Josh is 5 years old and is Autistic. He is nonverbal, but he is so communicative by any other nonverbal means. I have introduced PECS with him and he is flying with it. He is one I wish I could video as an example to other parents, as he is doing so well. We jumped to symbol


Read the Rest of this great post on our Blog
A Myriad of Materials - By: Heather Greenwood

As any speech-language pathologist or SLP student knows, materials that we use for therapy can be quite costly. During my online adventures traveling through the world of speech therapy resources, I have gathered a collection of ideas to share with you to help you in acquiring free and low-cost materials for your materials library.

Read the Rest of this Guest Post on our Blog

Worth Repeating - Serving Students with Hearing Loss in the Schools: Speech and Language Services for Students in the Mainstream
By: Chute, P. & Nevins, M. (2009, September 22). The ASHA Leader.

Professionals should understand the relationship between a child's language and chronological age when serving students with hearing loss in the mainstream.The National Center on Physical Activity and Disability

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog
Also Worth Repeating: Playing with Self Esteem: The Importance of Social Skills
By: Stephen Rothenberg, Psy.D

Calvin ( a fictional name) is 9 years old, creative and full of great ideas. He is always making up games and wants the other kids to play with him. Unfortunately, Calvin's game are so complex that only he can understand what to do and he can't understand why the others are reluctant to play with him.

Sharon is 13 years old and is really excited about going on a ski trip with her school. When they arrive she is in such a rush to get on the lift that she impulsively pushes ahead of the other kids. She doesn't really understand why they are angry with her.

Charlie Brown (real name) always tries his best to be optimistic and make friends but, due to his low opinion of himself and past experiences of failure, he fails. A woman you know at the office is a very nice person but she tends to always stand a little too close (both to the men and women) and makes you somewhat uncomfortable. You are speaking with someone on the phone and they only want to tell you their news, neglecting to ask about what is happening in your life.

All of the above are examples of unsuccessful social interactions. But when do they become actual problems? This depends upon 2 factors.

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog
The PediaStaff Website - is "Not Just for Job Searching Anymore"
If you haven't been to the our website lately you are in for a treat. Not only have we completely redesigned it and added a whole lot of great information about our company, services and philosophy but we are stuffing it jam packed with fantastic pediatric and school based therapy resources for you and your staff to use everyday.

There you will find links to resources, organizations and websites on topics in pediatric speech, occupational and physical therapy including dozens of articles and videos. Topics are organized by therapy discipline and include Stuttering, Bilingualism, Autism, Down Syndrome, Pediatric Stroke, Oral Motor Issues, Speech Language Delay and much more. All articles and videos are resident on our site. No abstracts, no fees.

We hope you enjoy it! It is still very much a work in progress, but we think there is enough there to suggest that you check it out at your earliest convenience.

Visit our Resources Pages

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