February 15, 2013
xxx Edition 
Issue 6, Volume 6
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings and Happy Friday

Please enjoy our weekly newsletter offering for you!  
 
News Items:
 
  • Potential Blood Test Found To Detect Autism  
  • Vietnamese Babies Often out of Diapers at Nine Months - by Whistling
  • Parental Involvement in the News: Essay in Washington Post
  • Study Links Folic Acid to Lower Autism Risk
  • PediaStaff in the News:See Y'all in Texas! Come Meet PediaStaff at TSHA 2013
  • Bilingual Babies Know Their Grammar by 7 Months
  • Specific Language Impairment in the Media: Article in HuffPo
Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • App Review of the Week: Tabata Timer App to Get Moving
  • Book Review of the Week: Mystic - About a Teen with Paralysis 
  • OT Activity of the Week: Catching Bubbles on a String
  • Pinterest Pin of the Week: 18 Fine Motor Activities for Preschoolers

Articles and Special Features 

  • Physical Therapy Corner: Mapping A Route To The Land of Oz
  • SLP Corner: It's All About the Graphic Organizer
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner: TED Talk: Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are  
  • Worth Repeating: Top Ten Things the Classroom Teacher Needs to Know About Your Child with Special Needs
  • Also Worth Repeating: The ABC's of Speech
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Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





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Autism in the News: Potential Blood Test Found To Detect Autism   

[Source:  Medical News Daily]

 

A special blood marker has been found enabling further understanding of potential gut linked environmental factors to autism. The results could create blood tests for early screening of the condition.

The findings came from a clinical study by researchers from Western University and the University of Arkansas, and were published in the journal Translational Psychiatry.


World Parenting in the News:  Vietnamese Babies Often out of Diapers at Nine Months - by Whistling

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

Western babies are potty trained later these days and need diapers until an average of three years of age. But even infants can be potty trained. A study by researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, followed 47 infants and their mothers in Vietnam -- where potty training starts at birth and the need for diapers is usually eliminated by nine months of age.

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Parental Involvement in the News:  Essay in Washington Post

Thank you to Reading Rockets for recommending this story!

[Source:  Washington Post]

Is parent involvement in school really useful?

It's one of those things in education that everybody takes for granted: parent involvement is good and necessary. But is it, and if so, what kind? Here is an analysis from Alfie Kohn, the author of 12 books about education and human behavior, including "The Schools Our Children Deserve," "The Homework Myth," and "Feel-Bad Education... And Other Contrarian Essays on Children & Schooling." He lives

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Prenatal Nutrition in the News: Study Links Folic Acid to Lower Autism Risk

[Source: USA Today] 

 

Women who took folic acid supplements before and during pregnancy were about 40% less likely to have a baby later diagnosed with autism, according to a new study.

Women who took folic acid supplements before and during pregnancy were about 40% less likely to have a baby later diagnosed with autism, according to a provocative new study generating high interest in the scientific community.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

PediaStaff in the News:  See Y'all in Texas! Come Meet PediaStaff at TSHA 2013   

Are you a Texas-based Speech-Language Pathologist?

 

PediaStaff loves Texas and can't wait to meet you at the 57th Annual TSHA Convention and Exhibition!   This year it's in Dallas from Thursday, March 7-March 9th at the Dallas Convention Center.

We will be at Booth #313 and will have Toobaloos (of course) while supplies last!   Come meet our entire Texas team to hear what PediaStaff can do for your pediatric or school based speech-language pathology career in Texas.

 

Learn More About the Conference Through a Link our Blog

Bilingualism in the News:  Bilingual Babies Know Their Grammar by 7 Months  

[Source:  Science Daily.com]

 

Babies as young as seven months can distinguish between, and begin to learn, two languages with vastly different grammatical structures, according to new research from the University of British Columbia and Universit´┐Ż Paris Descartes.

 

Published February 14 in the journal Nature Communications and presented at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Boston, the study shows that

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Specific Language Impairment in the Media:  Article in HuffPo  

Thanks to our friend and #SLPeep -Tanya Coyle, @SLPTanya on Twitter and the Lexical Linguist Blog for recommending this article:

[Source: Huffington Post, UK]

by: Claire Mitchell, Clinical Specialist Speech and Language Therapist and Clinical Teaching Fellow

 

Specific language impairment (SLI) is so common it affects up to one child in every class and is as common as dyslexia and more common than autism but is barely heard of by the general public.

A group of leading Speech and Language Therapist (SLT) clinicians and academics including: Gina Conti-Ramsden, Professor of Child Language and Learning at the University of Manchester; Dorothy Bishop, Professor of Developmental Neuropsychology at Oxford University; Maggie Snowling, Professor  

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

App Review of the Week:  Tabata Timer App to Get Moving   

Thanks to Your Therapy Source for this excellent app review!

If you follow this blog at all you know I am always on the look out for apps that get kids and adults moving.  I have been use this free Tabata Timer app for quite some time now and really like it.  Tabata is an exercise protocol based on the work of a Japanese scientist named Izumi Tabat and his colleagues on high intensity interval training.  Basically you exercise for 4 minutes going as hard as you can for 20 seconds followed by a 10 second break repeating this 8 times.  I have had great success with children combining the Tabata 4 minute exercise routine with physical activity cards.

 

Read More About this App on our Blog

Book Review of the Week:  Mystic - About a Teen with Paralysis  

Reviewed by: Rob Gerth

I read a wonderful new book last week to my 8-year-old son that we both loved -- Mystic. It's about a teen girl who is living with paralysis -- Amelia and her best friend -- Greg. They start out in this world, but are quickly and literally sucked up into a strange land where Amelia can walk.

No spoilers here, butt let me say, this adventure is an adventure, it is not about a girl who couldn't, then could walk. It's part of her make-up and she struggles with both being in a chair and being out, but the story focuses on courage and friendship and the true meaning

 

 

Read the Rest of this Review Through a Link on our Blog

OT Activity of the Week:  Catching Bubbles on a String   

Thank You to Barbara Smith of the Recycling OT for posting this great idea from the Play Counts blog, on her Facebook page.

Use "sticky bubbles" for this activity!  Great for visual planning, visual tracking, proprioception, cooperation, self control, muscle control and words, words, words are just a few of the benefits of bubble play.

 

Learn More About this Activity (with Pictures) Through a Link on our Blog

Pinterest Pin of the Week:  18 Fine Motor Activities for Preschoolers    

Here is a great post that received almost 300 repins on our Pinterest board this week.  Many of these activities are well known to many pediatric OTs, but boy its great to have them all for easy reference on one post!

 

 Check out this Great Post / Pin Through a Link on our Blog

Physical Therapy Corner: Mapping A Route To The Land of Oz    

by:  Shelley Mannell, PT, C/NDT

Alas, there is no GPS to tell us the best route to take with our clients that will end at our desired destination: efficient postural control. But fortunately, there is beginning to be some research regarding the detours and what we can do to facilitate the journey.

Recent research has outlined that elevated arm posture (on either one side or both) in children with CP is a strategy to maintain balance when walking (1)  My clinical experience also tells me children with CP do this when searching for stability in sitting or in transitional movement as well.  They also have impaired anticipatory postural adjustments (2,3).

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog


SLP Corner: It's All About the Graphic Organizer

by Ryan Knoblauch, MA, CCC-SLP

 

When I was a boy, we didn't have graphic organizers.  All we had was paper, pencils, and 20 minutes to write on a topic of the teacher's choosing.  Okay, it wasn't quite like that.  Actually, it was quite boring, tedious, and uneventful.  So much so that I forget how I was taught to write paragraphs.  Maybe it comes more naturally to students that don't have speech and language difficulties.  Maybe not.  I noticed as I got older that the standardized tests wanted to see pre-planning strategies to my written responses.  Strategies?  Hmm.  I scribbled down some notes and wrote a rough draft in pencil.  Then, I pretty much copied my rough draft to the final draft using a pen.  Truly, it wasn't much pre-planning other than re-reading my work and checking 

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: TED Talk:  Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are

Editor's Note:  Special Thanks to Abby Brayton, MS.  OTR/L of the Notes from a Pediatric OT blog for sharing this terrific video that all teachers and therapist clinician should watch!!   Excellent!

From Abby:  Today I'm sharing Amy Cuddy's talk, "Your body language shapes who you are." This is a 20 minute talk, so if you don't have time to watch it right now, I highly recommend bookmarking it for later. I promise, you will not be disappointed.

Here are a few things to think about as you watch this talk:
  • What does your body language tell your students/children? Are you telling them, "I'm in power" with your body language? Is that what you want to be telling them?
  • How could you use this information to help your students (or children) who feel that they are not in power (as many children with special needs do feel)?
  • How could you use this information when teaching social skills to students, especially teenagers?
 Watch This Video on our Blog

Worth Repeating: Top Ten Things the Classroom Teacher Needs to Know About Your Child with Special Needs

Editor's Note:  Here is an excellent article to share with the parents and guardians of your kiddos!

[Source:  Special Education Advisor.com]

If your child with special needs has been mainstreamed or fully included in a general education classroom, it is important that you communicate openly and honestly with the teacher about your child's needs.

While special education teachers and outside agencies will meet with your child's classroom teacher to share information, these meetings can often be brief, delayed, or worse yet, cancelled until further notice.

Therefore, It is necessary for you to monitor the information that is shared between your child's teacher(s) and the support personnel, and then fill in any gaps. Between you and your child's school, here are the top ten things that the classroom teacher needs to know about your child's special needs:   

 

Also Worth Repeating: The ABC's of Speech

Here is a great blog post I found on a new blog, The Speech Newsletter.  Perhaps we can interest these ladies in being guest bloggers for us!

by Robyn Romano & Brook Todd

 

We have compiled and highlighted a list of suggestions that reflect Speech & Language development through the ABC's. We hope you find it useful in your everyday interactions with your kids! Our hope is that this list will give you ideas and suggestions to help facilitate communication with your child. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions!

 

A:  All about articulation! Developmental milestones indicate that kids should be babbling by 6-8 months and using 1-2 words by 12 months. Early sounds produced include (but are not limited to) m, b, p, d etc. All sounds are not learned or developed until around age 8. Therefore, certain errors and difficult sounds are expected and can be worked out on 

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog 

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