November 9, 2012
Weekly Edition
Issue 34, Volume 5
It's All About the Choices!     
          
Greetings!  

Its herrrreee!   ASHA 2012 is next week!   Our staff is tidying up their desks to greet everyone (y'all?) in Atlanta at our booth #1020.  Hundreds of Toobloos are on their way to the convention center for us to give them away to our visitors. The schedule is up for our social media booth #1823, and our volunteer #SLPeeps are ready and trained.  Our Learning Lab is also ready to go.  We are also putting the finishing touches on our fun Tweet & Greet for you as well!   All the scurrying around, and the crisp winter air, it feels like Santa's Workshop before Christmas!   

Here is our weekly newsletter offering for you.   Since we will all be in Atlanta next week, we will not have a newsletter for you next Friday, but we will return to you the Friday after Thanksgiving.  

Talk to you soon, and hope to see you in Atlanta! 
 
News Items: 
  • ADHD Drugs Do Not Raise Heart Risk In Children
  • Trickle-Down Anxiety: Study Examines Parental Behaviors That Create Anxious Children 
  • New York Magazine Article on Asperger's Syndrome
  • Smell You Later! Chemosignals Communicate Human Emotions 
  • Higher Anxiety Associated With Poorer Functioning in Children With Digeorge (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome
  • NIH To Launch Down Syndrome Registry
  • National Longitudinal Transition Study-2: Inclusion May Not Be Best After All 

Therapy Activities, Tips and Resources
  • App Review of the Week: Loopz Motor Planning Game and App Review
  • Speech Therapy Idea of the Week: S-Blends Flip Book for Fall 
  • Pinterest Pin of the Week: Turkey Mr. Potato Head

Upcoming Events 

  • "Tweet & Greet!" at ASHA: Your Chance to Put Your "Face to the Handle"

Articles and Special Features 

  • OT Corner: Potty Training and the Sensory Defensive Pre-Schooler 
  • SLP Corner: Theory of Mind, Language and Conversation 
  • Pediatric Therapy Corner: 10 Things They Don't Teach You in School - Learning on the Job as a School Based Therapist
  • Worth Repeating: How do Picture Books Make Toddlers Laugh?
  • Also Worth Repeating: NINDS Fact Sheet: Friedreich's Ataxia
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Have a great weekend and Take Care!

Heidi Kay and the PediaStaff Team





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ADHD in the News: ADHD Drugs Do Not Raise Heart Risk In Children

[Source Medical News Today]

 

Children who take Adderall, Ritalin, and other central nervous system stimulants, do not have a higher chance of developing serious heart conditions.

 

This finding, confirming research from 2011, came from a study at the University of Florida and was published in the British Medical Journal. The study contributes to a clinical and policy debate of treatment risks for kids with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) that has been going on for 10 years.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

Pediatric Anxiety in the NewsTrickle-Down Anxiety: Study Examines Parental Behaviors That Create Anxious Children

[Source Science Daily]

 

Parents with social anxiety disorder are more likely than parents with other forms of anxiety to engage in behaviors that put their children at high risk for developing angst of their own, according to a small study of parent-child pairs conducted at Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

 

Authors of the federally funded study say past research has linked parental anxiety to anxiety in children, but it remained unclear whether people with certain anxiety disorders engaged more often in anxiety-provoking behaviors. Based on the new study findings, they do. A report on the team's findings appears online ahead of print in the journal Child Psychiatry and Human Development.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Asperger's Syndrome in the News: New York Magazine Article on Asperger's Syndrome

(Very Personal) Editor's Note:  Fascinated by the cover, and I picked up a copy of New York Magazine in the airport on my way home from a visit with my own elderly father who has cancer and severe Asperger's Syndrome.   I am the daughter of a man whose place on the spectrum (undiagnosed until just recently) has left him dreadfully alone, and has left me and my mom with lifelong scars that will never heal (although I am doing my best to work with him on mine).   I am also the mother of a wonderful, but often very difficult young man who is on the "-ish" end (who will have a much, much better time with the outside world than my father will ever have).   While not our typical pediatric article, I hope you find the story - which warns about romanticizing a condition in that it minimizes real suffering of those truly afflicted - as interesting as I did.

By Benjamin Wallace

 

"Is every man in America somewhere on it?" Nora Ephron wondered about the autism spectrum in an e-mail to a friend a few months before her death. "Is every producer on it? Is every 8-year-old boy who is obsessed with statistics on it? Sometimes, when we say someone is on the spectrum, do we just mean he's a prick? Or a pathological narcissist? I notice that at least three times a week I am told (or I tell someone) that some man or other is on the spectrum."


 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Sensory Acquisition Research in the News: Smell You Later! Chemosignals Communicate Human Emotions

[Source:  Science Daily]

Many animal species transmit information via chemical signals, but the extent to which these chemosignals play a role in human communication is unclear. In a new study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, researcher G�n Semin and colleagues from Utrecht University in the Netherlands investigate whether we humans might actually be able to communicate our emotional states to each other through chemical signals.

 

 Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Digeorge Syndrome in the News: Higher Anxiety Associated With Poorer Functioning in Children With Digeorge (22q11.2 Deletion) Syndrome

[Source:  Science Daily]

 

UC Davis researchers have found that for children with the genetic disorder known as chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome anxiety - but not intelligence - is linked to poorer adaptive behaviors, such as self-care and communication skills, that affect daily life. The developmental syndrome, which is associated with a constellation of physical, cognitive and psychiatric problems, usually is apparent at birth or early childhood, and leads to lifelong challenges.

 

Read the Rest of This Article Through a Link on our Blog

Down Syndrome in the News:  NIH To Launch Down Syndrome Registry  

[Source: Disability Scoop]

 

A first-of-its-kind national registry is in the works to help connect people with Down syndrome and researchers studying the chromosomal disorder.

 

The database, which is being established by the National Institutes of Health, will offer individuals with Down syndrome and their families a secure website to enter their contact details and health information so that they can connect with researchers to participate in studies.

 

The platform will also allow participants to confidentially compare their experience with that of others who have the developmental disability, NIH officials said.

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Inclusion in the News:  National Longitudinal Transition Study-2: Inclusion May Not Be Best After All  

[Source: Disability Scoop]

Inclusion is often believed to be the best option for students with disabilities, but a new study calls into question whether or not the practice truly leads to better outcomes long term.

Researchers found that students with autism who spent 75 to 100 percent of their time in general education classrooms were no more likely to complete high school, go to college or see improvements in cognitive functioning than those who spent more time in segregated environments.

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

App Review of the Week:  Loopz Motor Planning Game and App Review  

by Margaret Rice

 

There are more and more active games coming out on the market.  LoopzTM is a toy available in stores ranging from $35 to $50 (Walmart, Target, ToysRUs, etc) and online that is a great tool to practice motor planning and coordination skills.  It is a set of four arches that has lights in each arch.  There are different ways to play with Loopz and motion sensors detect your movement as your wave your hands through the matching loops.  Some of the games start out with you using one hand to follow the lights and then progress to two hands.  In addition you can make music by turning on and off the loops, which the teenagers enjoy.  

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Speech Therapy Idea of the Week:  S-Blends Flip Book for Fall  

by Pam Dahm

 

Last week I posted a little Halloween Flip Book that was extremely popular with my readers.  I was surprised by it's popularity, as it was something I made years ago and hadn't pulled it out in a few years.  But as I saw how much the kids enjoyed using it this past week, I decided to create another one.  This one is specifically designed to be used to work on S-Blend words and phrases, as I have several little buddies who struggle with those skills.  I haven't had a chance to try it out yet, but basically I plan to use it just like the Halloween one.  The stack of pictures on the left side of the book are  

 

 Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link our Blog

Pinterest Pin of the Week:  Turkey Mr. Potato Head 

Wow this free, downloadable Thanksgiving activity from the blog Kiki Creates is hugely popular!  358 Repins and counting.  No surprise.  Its a really adorable activity!

 

Download this Great Activity Through a Link our Blog

Upcoming Event:  "Tweet & Greet!" at ASHA: Your Chance to Put Your "Face to the Handle" 

PediaStaff's preparations for ASHA 2012 are in the homestretch!  Last week, I shared the schedule for our exciting social media booth (featuring the #SLPeeps). I also told you about the Friday afternoon Learning Lab featuring our three of our favorite #SLPeeps - Kim Lewis, Tara Roehl and Megan Panatier.

Today I want to tell you about our "Tweet & Greet" video log (vlog) which will be held during three time slots (see schedule at the bottom of this post) at our social media booth (#1823) during the the ASHA convention.

 

Learn More About the Tweet & Greet on our Blog

OT Corner:  Potty Training and the Sensory Defensive Pre-Schooler 

[Source: SPD Blogger Network]

 

Reprinted with permission of the SPD Blogger Network

 

by "Reinventing Mommy"

 

This post isn't for the faint of heart.  Two words - two little words - that can strike fear into the hearts of every special needs parent.  It rocks our worlds, forces our children to confront challenges, and causes enough headaches that buying ibuprofen in bulk seems like a good plan.

I'm talking of course about potty training.

 

My boy is 3.5 years old.  He has a multitude of special needs, but the ones that seem most applicable to the potty training dilemma are his autism, his hypotonia, and - of course - his SPD.  So, what do you get when you put a kid with communication challenges, sensory issues, and low-tone together with a potty?  A whole lot of nothing happening, that's what.  Or, at least that's what's happening (or not happening) in our house.

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

SLP Corner: Theory of Mind, Language, and Conversation

By: Becca Jarzynski, MS, CCC-SLP 


When I am teaching others about speech and language, I sometimes reference theory of mind. Although this is not a term that many people throw around in everyday conversation (with the exception of us crazy SLPs, of course), all effective communicators draw upon their theory of mind skills frequently and without even knowing they are doing so. Without well developed theory of mind skills, our conversations would be disjointed or repetitive- we would risk insulting our audience or boring them to death with way too many details.

 

Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Pediatric Therapy Corner: 10 Things They Don't Teach You in School - Learning on the Job as a School Based Therapist

by Margaret Rice, PT

 

Looking back to graduation from physical therapy school, well over 10 years ago, I now realize that the professors missed quite a bit of information about school based therapy. After one class in pediatric physical therapy and an eight week internship, I never remember any of the professors discussing the following topics: Dress appropriately: Schools are not very clean places. The floors get swept sometimes and polished about once a year. The best outfit you could wear would be comfortable clothes with reinforced knees. You spend a lot of time on the floor and I have ripped so many pairs of pants in the knees. Also, you may want to wear a tool belt or at least carry an Allen wrench set. I must have cut class the day they discussed how to repair wheelchairs on the 

 

 Read the Rest of This Article on our Blog

Worth Repeating: How do Picture Books Make Toddlers Laugh?

[The Guardian UK, via Reading Rockets]

How do we know what makes toddlers laugh? A lot of picture books expect very young children to find things like a big splash, a loud noise or a vivid picture of someone getting hurt funny. Does a child who hasn't experienced these things in real life find them funny? If so, why is that?

All children are different and toddlers are no exception so there is no single answer to what will make a toddler laugh or why.

 

You have identified some of things which publishers, drawing on experience of children's reactions to words and pictures, have used to set precedents for funny books. These include classics such 

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

Also Worth Repeating: NINDS Fact Sheet: Friedreich's Ataxia

By: National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)

 

What is Friedreich's ataxia?

 

Friedreich's ataxia is an inherited disease that causes progressive damage to the nervous system resulting in symptoms ranging from gait disturbance and speech problems to heart disease. It is named after the physician Nicholaus Friedreich, who first described the condition in the 1860s. "Ataxia," which refers to coordination problems such as clumsy or awkward movements and unsteadiness, occurs in many different diseases and conditions. The ataxia of Friedreich's ataxia results from the degeneration of nerve tissue in the spinal cord and of nerves that control muscle movement in the arms and legs. The spinal cord becomes thinner and nerve cells lose some of their myelin sheath - the insular covering on all nerve cells that helps conduct nerve impulses.   

 

Read the Rest of this Article Through a Link on our Blog

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